EmmaVal
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Who thinks there finding a levels much more enjoyable than gcse’s?
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Jtohunt
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Nope, A Levels are much harder and more stressful, hence less enjoyable than GCSE's. I breezed through my GCSE's. My A Level's I didn't struggle with, but found more taxing and had to put much more effort in than I did my GCSE's. There were also much more distractions at A Level, social life balance, hormones and dealing with feelings regarding the opposite sex, in a good way, but was distracting. Had to really discipline myself to focus on studying and completing homework/revision etc, and to limit partying, socialising and playing games and social media influences.
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holly6901
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I prefer a levels because there's less subjects

I probably have a warped view since I'm doing 2 and a half a levels
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Obolinda
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Depends on the person I think
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Dancer2001
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I find them more enjoyable. I’m actually interested in almost everything I’m learning, which means I’m putting more effort in.
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NotTellingBitch
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I found GCSEs hell, and A-levels much more enjoyable. Part of that is more ability to control my time and generally being treated more like an adult, part of that is circumstantial-- over the summer between the two I ditched one friend group and adopted another-- and part of that is that I wasn't studying goddamn fine art any more. At A-level I feel more more directed; I'm lucky enough to have found a goal, and I know that my A-levels are contributing to that. Part of it is that I've finally figured out how to study. Part of it is excellent teaching. But other people at my college disagree; they're more stressed, or they prefer a more rigid structure to study, or they feel like they don't know where they're headed, or they don't like what they're studying.
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Jtohunt
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(Original post by holly6901)
I prefer a levels because there's less subjects

I probably have a warped view since I'm doing 2 and a half a levels
Yes there is less subjects to do at A Level, but I did 4 and it felt like 8. I guess it also depends on what A levels you are doing. I am at med school now and I did some of the hardest A Levels you can do to get into Uni and one of the hardest boards OCR, not to mention the grades you needed to get in. I did Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Music.
So A Levels was no fun, I had to really work hard to get the 2 A*s and 2 A's.
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pinesandapples2001
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My A level subjects were subjects I was interested in whereas gcses I had some subjects I was doing because I had to. However, workload wise and exam wise, A levels were much tougher (as expected of course)
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Jtohunt
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I also had loads of music commitments and 2 Grade 8 Music exams to prepare for, not to mention the preparation for the interviews at each Medical School (4 in total) and undertaking the 2 admission tests at the start of upper sixth UKCAT and BMAT, which meant I never had a summer between lower sixth and upper sixth. So I guess that all added to my not finding A Levels that enjoyable. Now I'm at Uni, I'm enoying every minute of it so far, which made it all worth it.
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Rolo1234
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Difference:
GCSEs are irrelevant, A-levels are more concerned
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DGeorge13
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(Original post by Jtohunt)
Yes there is less subjects to do at A Level, but I did 4 and it felt like 8. I guess it also depends on what A levels you are doing. I am at med school now and I did some of the hardest A Levels you can do to get into Uni and one of the hardest boards OCR, not to mention the grades you needed to get in. I did Biology, Chemistry, Maths and Music.
So A Levels was no fun, I had to really work hard to get the 2 A*s and 2 A's.
Personally I really like ocr. I also respect you for taking music
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Jtohunt
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(Original post by DGeorge13)
Personally I really like ocr. I also respect you for taking music
Thank you. Music was like my escape from the sciences and something I enjoyed. There was nothing wrong with OCR, but they tend to be slightly more harder than AQA and Edexcel from what I understand, given OCR is an Oxford and Cambridge examining board.
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Jtohunt
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(Original post by Rolo1234)
Difference:
GCSEs are irrelevant, A-levels are more concerned
Trust me, GCSE's are relevant, as firstly, you needed to obtain a certain grade, to be able to do the equivalent A Level and on some courses at University like Medicine and Engineering, the amount of GCSE's you had and the grades attached to them were part of the criteria for selection for interview or an offer. For example, one of the criterias just to be selected for interview to study the Medicine (A100) undergrad course at Cardiff University, was your best 9 GCSE's. An A* or a 9 at GCSE was equivalent to 3 points, an A or 8 & 7 was 2 points and a B or 6 was 1 point, which means your maximum total with your best 9 GCSE's would be 27. Even if you took 12 GCSE's, they only required your best 9. And to get an interview, you basically had to score 24 or more points.
So in some cases GCSE's are more than relevant, they are crucial.
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Rolo1234
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(Original post by Jtohunt)
Trust me, GCSE's are relevant, as firstly, you needed to obtain a certain grade, to be able to do the equivalent A Level and on some courses at University like Medicine and Engineering, the amount of GCSE's you had and the grades attached to them were part of the criteria for selection for interview or an offer. For example, one of the criterias just to be selected for interview to study the Medicine (A100) undergrad course at Cardiff University, was your best 9 GCSE's. An A* or a 9 at GCSE was equivalent to 3 points, an A or 8 & 7 was 2 points and a B or 6 was 1 point, which means your maximum total with your best 9 GCSE's would be 27. Even if you took 12 GCSE's, they only required your best 9. And to get an interview, you basically had to score 24 or more points.
So in some cases GCSE's are more than relevant, they are crucial.
maybe for medicine and oxbridge but not for engineering
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Jtohunt
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(Original post by Rolo1234)
maybe for medicine and oxbridge but not for engineering
The point is GCSEs are relevant, NOT irrelevant. And yes, many courses including Engineering require some GCSE's, whether it's Sciences for some science courses, maths for science, engineering and mathematical courses. Enlish language at GCSE is required on a lot of courses also. A friend of mine didn't get into UCL this year to do a psychology course, because she didn't have at least a B in her GCSE English. She had the grades at A Level, but they still required the B in GCSE English. So yes GCSE's are relevant. And trust me, some may not stipulate it, in their entry requirement, but they would expect it.
Courses like Aeronautical Enginering and Civil Enginering do require a minimum standard of GCSE's.
And it goes without saying, some A Levels cannot be undertaken, without the requisite GCSEs.
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Rolo1234
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(Original post by Jtohunt)
The point is GCSEs are relevant, NOT irrelevant. And yes, many courses including Engineering require some GCSE's, whether it's Sciences for some science courses, maths for science, engineering and mathematical courses. Enlish language at GCSE is required on a lot of courses also. A friend of mine didn't get into UCL this year to do a psychology course, because she didn't have at least a B in her GCSE English. She had the grades at A Level, but they still required the B in GCSE English. So yes GCSE's are relevant. And trust me, some may not stipulate it, in their entry requirement, but they would expect it.
Courses like Aeronautical Enginering and Civil Enginering do require a minimum standard of GCSE's.
And it goes without saying, some A Levels cannot be undertaken, without the requisite GCSEs.
Ohhhhh, ok! GCSEs are not irrelevant but as long as you get grade 6s or above for english, science and maths youre fine. Ace your A levels and they would cover for your GCSEs. Easy!
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Sinnoh
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I enjoyed A-levels and 6th form a lot more than GCSEs. Initially A-levels seemed easier but quite quickly that proved to not be the case. I remember towards the end of year 11 just being so bored with it all so it was a welcome shift.
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Jtohunt
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(Original post by Rolo1234)
Ohhhhh, ok! GCSEs are not irrelevant but as long as you get grade 6s or above for english, science and maths youre fine. Ace your A levels and they would cover for your GCSEs. Easy!
Except in Oxbridge and Medicine of course, which are determined by how many A*s you have at GCSE. Determined, may be the wrong word (I can't think of another right now), but even if they don't actually stipulate how many you need, except for Cardiff, when you look at the statistics of grades of those lucky enough to get offers and who ultimately get in, the average is roughly 9 or 10 A*s and above.
I applied to Jesus College Cambridge last year and was rejected post interview. When I looked at the stats of the offer holders at Jesus College for medicine on the FOI, the average offer holder had 10+ A*s at GCSE. Incidentally, the average applicant invited for interview had 6+ A*s at GCSE.
A person on TSR was told in their feedback from a rejection post interview at Cambridge, that one of the reasons was because their GCSE's were not quite good enough, even though they were good enough to get the interview in the first place.
So this just goes to show, GCSE's are relevant and important, even if they are not stipulated as a requirement.
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Rolo1234
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(Original post by Jtohunt)
Except in Oxbridge and Medicine of course, which are determined by how many A*s you have at GCSE. Determined, may be the wrong word (I can't think of another right now), but even if they don't actually stipulate how many you need, except for Cardiff, when you look at the statistics of grades of those lucky enough to get offers and who ultimately get in, the average is roughly 9 or 10 A*s and above.
I applied to Jesus College Cambridge last year and was rejected post interview. When I looked at the stats of the offer holders at Jesus College for medicine on the FOI, the average offer holder had 10+ A*s at GCSE. Incidentally, the average applicant invited for interview had 6+ A*s at GCSE.
A person on TSR was told in their feedback from a rejection post interview at Cambridge, that one of the reasons was because their GCSE's were not quite good enough, even though they were good enough to get the interview in the first place.
So this just goes to show, GCSE's are relevant and important, even if they are not stipulated as a requirement.
Yep 100%
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Rolo1234
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Wait you applied for medicine?
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