Turn on thread page Beta

Graduates or PG's: How long is your CV? watch

  • View Poll Results: What is the length of your CV?
    1 Page
    15
    27.27%
    2 Pages
    34
    61.82%
    3 Pages
    3
    5.45%
    More than 3 Pages
    3
    5.45%

    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lauren86)
    I've always been told never to use anything smaller than 12pt. Otherwise it looks like it's all crammed in.
    Not quite so sure. I'd say nothing smaller than 10, but 10 point Arial is as easy to read, IMHO, as 12 point Times New Roman.
    • CV Helper
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    Wiki Support Team
    (Original post by KLL)
    And seeign i'm still an undergraduate and can put 3 universties on my CV, i think they're all relevant just like the last 2 or 3 chools i went to.
    Can I ask why you moved so much? I've employed people in the past, and if I saw three Universities on someone's CV while obtaining an undergraduate degree then I would question how long they would stay with me as an employee.

    However, if you went to one for a BSc, one for a MSc and another for a PhD then that's slightly different.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BlackHawk)
    Can I ask why you moved so much? I've employed people in the past, and if I saw three Universities on someone's CV while obtaining an undergraduate degree then I would question how long they would stay with me as an employee.

    However, if you went to one for a BSc, one for a MSc and another for a PhD then that's slightly different.
    Well for school it was my parents. At uni level its a bit of a long story:

    1st one was an intensive language course at a top asian university, wanted to study in germany and my IB results would come out after application deadline (they don'T have a concept of predicted grades), so I thought i'd spend my involountary gap year doing that.
    At German uni I was in a rather generalsit Busienss Economics course. A Bachelor (which is new in Germany). I figured I wanted to focus on finance and was shocked to see how the finance and banking related departments got downsized. Also student staisfaction was very low (due to the course beeing somewhat experimental and many professors thinking they needed to fail 50% of the students).
    Knowing what I want to do, I'm gonna do Banking and Finance in the UK this year. Sadly most UK unis are apparantly so arrogant that they don't give credit for my previous study at german uni (eventho it was a very reputated) so i'll have to start from year 1.
    Might want to do an Erasmus year there and a Masters in yet another country (France, Canada and Australia spring to mind).

    So as you can see i'm a learning by doing guy who enjoys internationality.
    Most employers and university lecturers and tutors i talked to seemed to think it was a good expereince for me and even encouraged it.

    Or would you view that negatively?
    • CV Helper
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    Wiki Support Team
    I think it's very hard to get across on a CV, and I think you should be careful how it comes across. I would question how committed you are on paper, whereas in an interview you have more chance to sell yourself and it will come across in a positive way.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BlackHawk)
    I think it's very hard to get across on a CV, and I think you should be careful how it comes across. I would question how committed you are on paper, whereas in an interview you have more chance to sell yourself and it will come across in a positive way.
    I managed to put in quite well in cover letters and my personal statement till now i guess.

    But you'Re actually right, I wouldn't want to do the same job at the same place for long.. it gets boring. I always wanna expereince and learn new things. So a job where I travel a lot and have differing tasks and projects every motnh at least would be ideal. Consulting and that kidna stuff sounds like it would be my thing.
    Doing the same thing with little variance for a year or even logner is just a dreadful thought.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ThePants999)
    Except you could fill 2 pages with the society presidency alone
    surely thats one line xxxx society president?
    ticks the box in the head of the employer without boring them
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    1 page 12pt arial
    I think I will go to 11pt though when I next draft it out
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Drogue)
    Well, firstly I'm not straight out of uni, the 2 pages includes my current graduate job, which takes up about 5 or 6 lines and puts bits onto the second page. However everything I really want someone to read is on the first page, so if someone only reads that I'm fine. The second page gives a little more detail on my academic stuff - as the last job I applied for was as an economist so they wanted to know what modules I'd taken and the marks I'd got - and lists the previous jobs I've had - as my current employer wants to know any paid work I've had for the last 5 years.

    Also, I'm a bit of a special case having had 4 jobs before I went to university, plus the stuff at uni.

    Having 2 pages is not the end of the world at all. If you're applying for a technical or academic job, they'd expect more detail of your academics so 2 pages, or even 3 in extreme cases, is fine. If you've got 2 pages of really strong stuff, then there's no harm, though getting it onto one is better. However it's very, very rare anyone straight out of university has enough decent stuff to require a 2 page CV for a normal graduate job. Most grads have quite a lot of unnecessary stuff on it, in my opinion, and the shorter the better.
    Oh okay, cool. I've had six jobs, so I thought I might have a skills section where I talk about what I gained from jobs (thus allowing me to talk about more than one job at once, for example skills obtained from both waitressing jobs), then in my work experience section just listing the positions. I've also done quite a few things at uni (JCR treasurer, marketing for student radio, captain of two teams), and in my gap year I did an art foundation course (which isn't relevant to the job I'm looking for, but I figured I'll need to mention it or there'll be an unexplained hole!). What do you think?

    I'm sort of just saying this to attempt to gain your approval to go onto a second page, which is kind of pathetic, but I'm a bit OCD about making it right. Better than being sloppy, though, I suppose ...
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    CV Helper
    If you've done several jobs that required the same skills, or if you have done jobs which seem radically different from the job you are trying to get, then having a more detailed skills section often works well. But generally you leave the employment to a single line per job - so you still might not need to use that second page!
    • CV Helper
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    Wiki Support Team
    (Original post by Jelkin)
    Oh okay, cool. I've had six jobs
    Six?! In how many years?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BlackHawk)
    Six?! In how many years?
    5-6, I guess. Actually, it includes work experience which was quite short. At school and my gap year (4 years) I had three jobs, though I had two at once throughout most of that so they overlapped. Then last year at uni I was employed writing something for the council back home, then in the holidays since Easter of my fresher year I've been working for the NHS. I suppose it is quite a bit, but I've never really thought about it!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Quady)
    surely thats one line xxxx society president?
    ticks the box in the head of the employer without boring them
    ThePants was making a comment, as he knows which society we're talking about. And no, it's not one line, as being society president adds little to any application. What employers care about is why it makes you a better employee. That's why I have about 4 or 5 bullet points under the heading to put the main achievements and things I did as society president.

    Society presidents can spent 5-10 hours a week doing it, maybe even less for some societies. Others take 30+ to run. There's a hgue difference in what societies do and the opportunities within them.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Absolutely. As an employer, why should the presidency of some society I've never heard of tick any boxes? I want to know why you're the right applicant for this job of mine. So if you're going to tell me about a society presidency, I want to know what you achieved and what skills it gave you, not just that you happened to win an election.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jelkin)
    Oh okay, cool. I've had six jobs, so I thought I might have a skills section where I talk about what I gained from jobs (thus allowing me to talk about more than one job at once, for example skills obtained from both waitressing jobs), then in my work experience section just listing the positions. I've also done quite a few things at uni (JCR treasurer, marketing for student radio, captain of two teams), and in my gap year I did an art foundation course (which isn't relevant to the job I'm looking for, but I figured I'll need to mention it or there'll be an unexplained hole!). What do you think?

    I'm sort of just saying this to attempt to gain your approval to go onto a second page, which is kind of pathetic, but I'm a bit OCD about making it right. Better than being sloppy, though, I suppose ...
    Jobs involving waitressing as a student are unlikely to be very relevant in getting your first job after graduation and should be included as one liners if you have lots of them. Did they really give you skills you are proud of in the context of graduate-level roles? Or are you applying for more of the same (in which case they are relevant, though your education may not be)? The extracurricular roles (team captain, for instance) are equally thin, to be honest. An art foundation course is one line unless it has major relevance. Your GCSEs and A levels are one line between them.

    A lot of people have difficulty in distinguishing what is truly positive and relevant and a rule of thumb is that a new graduate's CV should not go over one page unless they have something truly exceptional and relevant to say.

    Spending a lot of space waffling about how your waitressing has given you world class team working, communication and decision-making abilities will merely highlight you as a time waster with little ability to discriminate in the real world. So be careful if you go over the recommended dose!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Jobs involving waitressing as a student are unlikely to be very relevant in getting your first job after graduation and should be included as one liners if you have lots of them. Did they really give you skills you are proud of in the context of graduate-level roles? Or are you applying for more of the same (in which case they are relevant, though your education may not be)? The extracurricular roles (team captain, for instance) are equally thin, to be honest. An art foundation course is one line unless it has major relevance. Your GCSEs and A levels are one line between them.

    A lot of people have difficulty in distinguishing what is truly positive and relevant and a rule of thumb is that a new graduate's CV should not go over one page unless they have something truly exceptional and relevant to say.

    Spending a lot of space waffling about how your waitressing has given you world class team working, communication and decision-making abilities will merely highlight you as a time waster with little ability to discriminate in the real world. So be careful if you go over the recommended dose!
    Yeah, one of my jobs is sales assistant and two are waitressing, so I don't want to take up too much space with those, which is why I think I'll do a skills section which means I can lump together things like handling money into a shorter space. I don't think being JCR treasurer is thin because it is relevant and I am "in charge" of quite a lot of money, so I'll probably stick that in there as well. Art foundation will obviously not take up much space either. I don't think GCSEs and A levels can all fit into one line, because my A level subjects ARE relevant to the job. Unless maybe I reduced font.

    I think my main problem is not that I want to waffle on about a lot, but that I have a lot of things to list and I don't want massive blocks of text so I need to include white space to keep it readable! I suppose I'll finish it and then see how I can reduce it down.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jelkin)
    Yeah, one of my jobs is sales assistant and two are waitressing, so I don't want to take up too much space with those, which is why I think I'll do a skills section which means I can lump together things like handling money into a shorter space. I don't think being JCR treasurer is thin because it is relevant and I am "in charge" of quite a lot of money, so I'll probably stick that in there as well.
    IMHO, JCR treasurer is worth a few lines to develop, but other than one line to mention "I was a waitress/sales assistant", I'd skip the rest. Skills are for competancy interviews, CVs are to say what you've done. Yes, if there are specific skills that are relevant from those jobs to the particular job you're applying for, put them. But for most grad jobs, saying "I was a waitress" is enough, as the skills gained will be the same as anywhere else.

    The only one of my pre-uni jobs that gets more than a line to say the job title, employer and date, is the summer I spent working as an accountant for the county council, as it's relevant to public sector and finance jobs. Even that gets 3 lines max (one line of the details above and 1-2 bullet points (depending on the job I'm applying for) to explain what I did).
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jelkin)
    I think my main problem is not that I want to waffle on about a lot, but that I have a lot of things to list and I don't want massive blocks of text so I need to include white space to keep it readable! I suppose I'll finish it and then see how I can reduce it down.
    No. Your main problem is that you are starting with the intention to get everything down on paper when you should be looking for a reason to include every word. Ask yourself: is it relevant?; is it positive?; why am I writing this?
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    My CV changes between one and two pages (never more!) depending on what I'm going for. If I'm applying for a job which is related to my degree, it's generally two pages as then I include a reasonable level of detail on my academics, work placements, employment, etc. If I'm just applying for voluntary work or something like that, it'll be one page with mainly my voluntary experience, my current job and a brief summary of my education. I have about 3 pages worth of actual "stuff" I could put in but I pick and choose from it depending on the role - I certainly would never put all of it down for any job!
    Offline

    13
    Only one page.

    I might start taking a life policy of just binning second (and extra) pages come the day I review the things.
    • CV Helper
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    CV Helper
    Wiki Support Team
    (Original post by President_Ben)
    I might start taking a life policy of just binning second (and extra) pages come the day I review the things.
    Nah, bin the first page. People use fill it up with all their personal details, in depth analysis of their school results and what they had for dinner last night.

    Still, I had an 18 page CV from a school leaver once.
 
 
 
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Useful resources

Articles and guides:

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A-Z of careers Advice on choosing a careerCV writing helpCovering letter helpInterview tips

Featured recruiter profiles:

CGI logo

CGI is open for applications

"Offering a range of apprentice and sponsored degree positions."

Deutsche Bank logo

Deutsche Bank is recruiting

"Thrive in an international banking environment"

ICAEW logo

Merck

"Merck is a global leader in specialized pharma & chemicals – join us!"

Army logo

The Army is recruiting now

"With hundreds of roles available, there’s more than one way to be the best."

Bianca Miller, runner-up on The Apprentice

Handle your digital footprint

What would an employer find out about you on Google? Find out how to take control.

Quick links:

Unanswered career sector and employment threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.