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    I've just realised how much i've disappointed my mum and myself. She spotted my talent in music when I was like, 10 years old and that was when I started having piano lessons. I did my grade 5 theory exam when I was 12, and did my piano grade 6 exam with distinction when i was 13. But I was one lazy bugger, and decided to quit. Now i'm 16 (almost 17) and going on to year 13, IB2. Is it okay if I continue my lessons now? my mum would be really happy to pay for the lessons again. I'm planning to do my grade 8 perhaps around term 1 of university, year 1. Am I considered slow for that?
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    Does it matter what you'll be considered? If you want to play, play...and practice. You will probably need to take it up from a couple of steps below where you were but you should be able to catch up very quickly.
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    Grade 6 in three years from scratch is impressive. you shouldn't have given up, but no of course it's not too late Just work harder this time and don't stop :p: You wouldn't believe how much pleasure you can get out of it, so much that you won't want to stop ever again.
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    Plenty of people take graded exams much later than that!
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    i don't want to be the discouraging bum, but grades really don't mean for anything. i did up to grade 5 in a year, but only since about 3 years ago, would i have considered myself someone who really knew, understood and loved music.

    bottom line, you gotta love it. if you want to take it up, don't let anything stop you - year 13 really isn't an ideal time, as you have exam stress etc, so if i were you, i would concentrate on getting to know as much repetoire as possible and playing for pleasure (which is what you want right?) rather than confining yourself to the restrictions of grades.
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    I have an insane passion for music. Let me reitorate: I quit because I couldn't be bothered to attend them 1 hour lessons every week. My tennis + academic schedule covers so much.... but I now really miss my piano lessons!
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    (Original post by Aegilia)
    I have an insane passion for music. Let me reitorate: I quit because I couldn't be bothered to attend them 1 hour lessons every week. My tennis + academic schedule covers so much.... but I now really miss my piano lessons!
    Then start again. Seriously, the sooner the better. It may not be worth doing grade 8 at the same time as A2s, but just playing will be reward in itself. If you want then go down to 40min a week, I've only had an hour for a year or so when I did my diploma.
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    (Original post by Aegilia)
    I have an insane passion for music. Let me reitorate: I quit because I couldn't be bothered to attend them 1 hour lessons every week. My tennis + academic schedule covers so much.... but I now really miss my piano lessons!
    you need to have an insane committment, to aid your insane passion. an hour a week is actually quite minimal IMO. i have an insane passion which is why im cool with giving up an entire day (9hrs, yes 9) on saturdays to go to a junior conservetoire - plus practice time everyday of course, for at least the duration of your 1 to 1 lesson time, plus listening to inspirational artists, plus going to summer camps to meet inspirational coaches... you enter a different world, and you'll love it. :yep:
    if you laze around, you won't have the technique. if you don't have the technique, you won't be able to play the music. if you can't play the music... then well... you'll lose the unique oppurtunity to be able to interact and communicate with the music, which would be a real shame, if you are serious about playing.
    basically, if you REALLY REALLY DO love it, 100%, absolutely, take it back up, progress at your own pace, listen to masters play, and musically you will also mature. don't be ashamed because you don't have grade 8 in your pocket, it really means nothing in the professional musical world, play because you love it. i can't emphasise that enough. too many people these days stroll into the world of music without knowing anything about it, for the sole purpose of either impressing their friends with fast finger movements, or to get UCAS points - love the music, if you do, you'll be able to find time even in the tightest of schedules (i did 5AS:eek: levels, plus icehockey, and managed juggle everything, because i'd have stayed up till 3 in the morning if i had to, to do music)
    good luck
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    I've been out of playing piano properly for about 2yrs now because of the nature of my university course, but when I am qualified I plan on taking lessons again, I don't see why you couldn't, it's never too late.
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    You don't need to do the saturday thing, I nearly did, was good enough for the Guildhall, but decided not to. Glad I didn't. As I said, I had 40min to 1 hour a week for my entire lesson career, and rarely did more than 40min practice a day, although in addition to that there was a fair bit of doodling :p: It's given me nothing but pleasure and I wouldn't want to be much better to be honest.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    You don't need to do the saturday thing, I nearly did, was good enough for the Guildhall, but decided not to. Glad I didn't. As I said, I had 40min to 1 hour a week for my entire lesson career, and rarely did more than 40min practice a day, although in addition to that there was a fair bit of doodling :p: It's given me nothing but pleasure and I wouldn't want to be much better to be honest.
    which is a very sensible thing to do, if that is what you wanted, because Guildhall will burn you out if you're not "getting in to it"
    but OP has an insane passion for music. i think conservetoire is a good remedy :yep:
    although, having said that, it's a bit late now. my point is, you need comitment :yep:
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    (Original post by unikq)
    which is a very sensible thing to do, if that is what you wanted, because Guildhall will burn you out if you're not "getting in to it"
    but OP has an insane passion for music. i think conservetoire is a good remedy :yep:
    although, having said that, it's a bit late now. my point is, you need comitment :yep:
    You do need commitment, just in different ways I'm sure I would have enjoyed Guildhall, and I am certainly commited to music, but the practicality of going to London every saturday for the whole day turned me against the thing. I've still had a fairly good musical career, so it's not all bad
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    You do need commitment, just in different ways I'm sure I would have enjoyed Guildhall, and I am certainly commited to music, but the practicality of going to London every saturday for the whole day turned me against the thing. I've still had a fairly good musical career, so it's not all bad
    :yep:
    getting to london is a pain - but a lot of people do it..
    took me 30 mins by train to get to Guildhall every saturday
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    (Original post by unikq)
    :yep:
    getting to london is a pain - but a lot of people do it..
    took me 30 mins by train to get to Guildhall every saturday
    Did you ever meet Kasia Borowiak? Or Nikki Shin? The former was my piano teacher, the latter (I think that's his last name) I'm pretty sure did Guildhall for a bit.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    Did you ever meet Kasia Borowiak? Or Nikki Shin? The former was my piano teacher, the latter (I think that's his last name) I'm pretty sure did Guildhall for a bit.
    you learned from Kasia Borowiak? bloody hell. her son is ****ing amazing
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    The gap between grade 6 and grade 8 isn't much so it's doable.

    I would get it out the way in the first term of uni when there aren't too much pressures, because you don't want to muck up your A levels, however there are no deadlines on this music, as you could do this at any age 21, 25 30 40 50 etc. There's no rush.

    Incidentally I went from passing grade 5 theory to taking grade 8 theory in 4 months worth of just weekends (Sat and Sun solid mind, and did have some weekend breaks inbetween in case I burnt out) but I did it because I really grittily wanted to, I didn't have to for any reason and they say Grade 8 theory is equivalant to A level Music (don't know if that is true).

    I agree with the above post re: fast fingers etc. There are those who do grades for various reasons for university points, brag factor, pushy parents, peer factors.

    Grade 8 practical needs a lot of work and if you make it mechanical you'll get a pass and do it in a quicker time, if you want the distinction, that will take a longer time, more practice etc. But then again people are obsessed with the grade level ie 8, rather than distiction etc. Depends what you want.

    I'd say a good 80% of people I've met do it for non-musical reasons ie university points or pushy parents, rather than they really enjoy music or want to be good at their instrument.

    In fact the best musician I ever met had never done any exams but was stupendous technically and tonally.

    I tend to be a bit cynical about music exams, because I've heard plenty of clunky grade 8s who brag, yet at the same time I appreciate it's a marker for a certain level of expertise.

    Do ABRSM rather than Trinity as well.
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    (Original post by Aegilia)
    I've just realised how much i've disappointed my mum and myself. She spotted my talent in music when I was like, 10 years old and that was when I started having piano lessons. I did my grade 5 theory exam when I was 12, and did my piano grade 6 exam with distinction when i was 13. But I was one lazy bugger, and decided to quit. Now i'm 16 (almost 17) and going on to year 13, IB2. Is it okay if I continue my lessons now? my mum would be really happy to pay for the lessons again. I'm planning to do my grade 8 perhaps around term 1 of university, year 1. Am I considered slow for that?
    Not meaning to be big headed here. But i am somewhat of a musical genius and I have never taken a musical examination in my life apart from GCSE but that was so easy. Anyways what I am trying to say is you don't need a piece of paper to say you can play and also if you don't bother with exams you get more out of the learning process because its a personal incentive.

    I am just about to start year 12 and have been offered a place at Cambridge obviously it depends upon my results in public examinations. But one of the things they have asked me to do is take my grade 7 and 8 and pass with distinction.

    But tbh music is my escape from accademics why anyone would want to turn it into academics i don't know.

    Hope you find a balance that is right for you
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    Slow? I know ten year olds who've done it.

    Fast? I know much more people who've not done it at all.

    There is no judgement to be passed!!


    You play if you want to, and get better as a consequence.

    It's the end result that's important . . . who cares if you got a grade here or then along the way?
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    (Original post by Aegilia)
    I've just realised how much i've disappointed my mum and myself. She spotted my talent in music when I was like, 10 years old and that was when I started having piano lessons. I did my grade 5 theory exam when I was 12, and did my piano grade 6 exam with distinction when i was 13. But I was one lazy bugger, and decided to quit. Now i'm 16 (almost 17) and going on to year 13, IB2. Is it okay if I continue my lessons now? my mum would be really happy to pay for the lessons again. I'm planning to do my grade 8 perhaps around term 1 of university, year 1. Am I considered slow for that?
    ooh i can entirely relate...my musical talent was recognised and encouraged from the age of two. but i was very half hearted and lazy with the whole thing until i was well into my late teens.

    I didn't take my first grade 1 exam on the piano until I was (recalling here...) 14/15 and I finally took grade 8 aged 19.

    So to answer your question, you were ahead of the game taking the exams you listed back when you did. So now, in my opinion, the only way is up, I'd recommend skipping grade 7 (sooo similar to grade 8 i think so may as well actually do grade 8 lol) and finally getting the qualification that your talent from an early age would suggest that you deserve

    it's definately not too late, just view it as the notion that you had a break but now you're back in action

    good luck
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    (Original post by Afton Lawson)
    Not meaning to be big headed here. But i am somewhat of a musical genius and I have never taken a musical examination in my life apart from GCSE but that was so easy. Anyways what I am trying to say is you don't need a piece of paper to say you can play and also if you don't bother with exams you get more out of the learning process because its a personal incentive.

    I am just about to start year 12 and have been offered a place at Cambridge obviously it depends upon my results in public examinations. But one of the things they have asked me to do is take my grade 7 and 8 and pass with distinction.

    But tbh music is my escape from accademics why anyone would want to turn it into academics i don't know.

    Hope you find a balance that is right for you
    Absolutely. and the bit of **** paper means NOTHING. why? i've seen people who play like absolute ****, who have grade 8 - musically know or understand **** all and don't even have the technical tools for grade 8, but still passed. now, i also have grade 8, but (again not trying to be big headed), if i were to be compared with such people, as a musician, performer and instrumentalist, i'd be **** offended.
 
 
 
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