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    Hi,
    I am studying three dimensional geometry nowadays,but there are few early problems that I have been facing and that includes-
    I have very weak visualization problem,I just can't visualise the points in 3D .
    I don't know in which axis it is positive or negative unlike where there are only four quadrants.
    I am trying to calculate the proof of the distance between points in 3 D but don't know how.
    If there are some brilliant sites that provides interactive tutorial on 3D then post that for me as well.
    Thanks...............
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    i dont understand what you mean by calculate the proof surely it just is a case of working out the change in x,y and z and then just using trigonometry!

    when visualising just imagine a regular xy axis and then think of it protruding out of the page! it is hard to see where a line will go in 3 dimensions unlike in 2 where by just looking at 2 coordinated you can see where the line will generally go!
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    (Original post by roshanhero)
    Hi,
    I am studying three dimensional geometry nowadays,but there are few early problems that I have been facing and that includes-
    I have very weak visualization problem,I just can't visualise the points in 3D .
    I don't know in which axis it is positive or negative unlike where there are only four quadrants.
    I am trying to calculate the proof of the distance between points in 3 D but don't know how.
    If there are some brilliant sites that provides interactive tutorial on 3D then post that for me as well.
    Thanks...............
    I don't see any particularly easy way to visualise 3D - do you really need to, though?

    To find the distance between points (a, b, c) and (a', b', c'), you simply use Pythagoras twice on the cube with those two points being the endpoint of a diagonal (and edges parallel to the axes, etc...). Reducing the problem to cubes is often a good way to go; another way is to consider projections onto the x-y, y-z and x-z planes.

    You could also change axes, and set the point (a, b, c) to be your new origin O'. Then the point (a', b', c') with respect to O will become (a' - a, b' - b, c' - c) with respect to O', and you can easily work out the distance of a point from the origin (how?).
 
 
 
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