How do you use a specification at a level (science) ? Watch

Poll: How do you use a specification at a level (science) ?
Take notes from the textbook and only write stuff that comes up on the spec (0)
0%
Take notes of everything from the textbook and simplyfy them using the spec. use spec as checklist (2)
100%
Azimbrook1
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Do you:
1. have the textbook and spec open and only write notes from the stuff thats in the spec (taking notes from the textbook)

2. Take notes of everything in the textbook and use the spec to simplyfy it down (and use it as a checklist)

Im not sure which option to take because if I do option 1,there may be something in the textbook that is important that Ive missed out. Also, the spec is vauge,so I may need to learn something that I didnt know I had to learn

If I do option 2, I risk learning stuff that doesnt need to be learnt (at the start)

I am mainly talking about a level biolgy, but im sure that it applies to other science a levels
Last edited by Azimbrook1; 1 month ago
0
reply
aw03
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by Azimbrook1)
Do you:
1. have the textbook and spec open and only write notes from the stuff thats in the spec (taking notes from the textbook)

2. Take notes of everything in the textbook and use the spec to simplyfy it down (and use it as a checklist)

Im not sure which option to take because if I do option 1,there may be something in the textbook that is important that Ive missed out. Also, the spec is vauge,so I may need to learn something that I didnt know I had to learn

If I do option 2, I risk learning stuff that doesnt need to be learnt (at the start)

I am mainly talking about a level biolgy, but im sure that it applies to other science a levels
do both! especially for Biology. take notes of everything because they wouldn't put it in the book if you didn't need to know it. they can ask about anything in the book at least that's how it is with OCR. the spec is just a guideline and then the book goes in depth with each bullet point.
0
reply
Darkasmyweave
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
I would NOT recommend taking textbook notes! It'll take you forever and believe me at A level you won't have time. The textbook is useful for reference, and they have 'extra' bits that may come up in exams, but don't take notes directly from it. As someone doing A level biology, I recommend watching spec specific YouTube videos or using revision books to make condensed notes, while using the spec to ensure everything is covered. Then do past papers. I know everyone says this but there's no point making super long notes if they can't help you in the actual exam, and past papers can help you figure out what you need to brush up on. Hope that helps (I'm in yr 13 rn if that makes me any more reliable lol)
0
reply
_thekingpheonix_
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by Azimbrook1)
Do you:
1. have the textbook and spec open and only write notes from the stuff thats in the spec (taking notes from the textbook)

2. Take notes of everything in the textbook and use the spec to simplyfy it down (and use it as a checklist)

Im not sure which option to take because if I do option 1,there may be something in the textbook that is important that Ive missed out. Also, the spec is vauge,so I may need to learn something that I didnt know I had to learn

If I do option 2, I risk learning stuff that doesnt need to be learnt (at the start)

I am mainly talking about a level biolgy, but im sure that it applies to other science a levels
The biology specification can be really misleading. When it comes to learning content it is better to learn everything as this caters to how the questions will be asked in the exam. For example a spec point might be to understand the structure and function of the heart including the cardiac cycle, an application question could be related to something that is not on your spec but may be in the book, such as why can a baby with a whole that connects the ventricular walls able to survive at birth. Knowing this may not be in your spec but a similar scenario may be in your book. Reading your whole book will give you an edge in the exam.
0
reply
Azimbrook1
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by Darkasmyweave)
I would NOT recommend taking textbook notes! It'll take you forever and believe me at A level you won't have time. The textbook is useful for reference, and they have 'extra' bits that may come up in exams, but don't take notes directly from it. As someone doing A level biology, I recommend watching spec specific YouTube videos or using revision books to make condensed notes, while using the spec to ensure everything is covered. Then do past papers. I know everyone says this but there's no point making super long notes if they can't help you in the actual exam, and past papers can help you figure out what you need to brush up on. Hope that helps (I'm in yr 13 rn if that makes me any more reliable lol)
I'm not going to make notes (unless I really dont understand a topic). I'm just gonna write myself questions and look for the textbook for the answer. then I'll do past paper questions. I'm just wondering if I should cover everything in the textbook or leave some stuff out
Last edited by Azimbrook1; 1 month ago
0
reply
Darkasmyweave
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by Azimbrook1)
I'm not going to make notes (unless I really dont understand a topic). I'm just gonna write myself questions and look for the textbook for the answer. then I'll do past paper questions. I'm just wondering if I should cover everything in the textbook or leave some stuff out
Of course it'd be great if you could learn everything in the textbook, but realistically that's not possible. For example, photosynthesis is about 5 pages in the textbook but can easily be summarised in two diagrams. The textbook gives you enough detail to answer any possible question, but a lot of it you may already know from GCSE or is not entirely necessary to make notes on.You can easily reach that level of knowledge by going through past papers, especially ones with synoptic content or with new scenarios you haven't directly learnt about, as that's what the textbook is trying to prepare you for.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • SOAS University of London
    Development Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies, Anthropology and Sociology, Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, Arts, Economics, Law, History, Religions and Philosophies, Politics and International Studies, Finance and Management, East Asian Languages & Cultures Postgraduate
    Sat, 25 Jan '20
  • University of Huddersfield
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 25 Jan '20
  • The University of Law
    Solicitor Series: Assessing Trainee Skills – LPC, GDL and MA Law - Guildford campus Postgraduate
    Wed, 29 Jan '20

How many uni open days have you been to/did you go to?

0 (65)
27.08%
1 (40)
16.67%
2 (40)
16.67%
3 (33)
13.75%
4 (16)
6.67%
5 (20)
8.33%
6 (6)
2.5%
7+ (20)
8.33%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed