alinazubairx
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in terms of catalytic cracking and thermal cracking, what are the products? do they both produce alkanes and alkenes?
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Deggs_14
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Thermal cracking produces alkenes and alkanes, catalytic cracking producers more aromatic compounds, ie with a benzene ring.
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alinazubairx
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(Original post by Deggs_14)
Thermal cracking produces alkenes and alkanes, catalytic cracking producers more aromatic compounds, ie with a benzene ring.
ohhh ok, when you mean aromatic compounds, those are most likely alkenes right?
it's because, when testing the gas obtained during catalytic cracking, you would use the flame test and bromine test. if the flame is smokey its alkane and if alkanes are present the Br water remains orange. but how would you know if both alkanes and alkenes are present?
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Deggs_14
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(Original post by alinazubairx)
ohhh ok, when you mean aromatic compounds, those are most likely alkenes right?
it's because, when testing the gas obtained during catalytic cracking, you would use the flame test and bromine test. if the flame is smokey its alkane and if alkanes are present the Br water remains orange. but how would you know if both alkanes and alkenes are present?
No, an aromatic compound being combusted would produce lots of soot as there is quite a high carbon to oxygen ratio, or it would take more moles of oxygen than a corresponding alkane and alkene. I haven’t used a “smoky flame” before? If an alkene is present the bromine liquid would react in an electrophilic addition reaction, but aromatic compounds don’t readily undergo electrophilic addition.

If you want to distinguish between alkanes and alkenes then you’d want to use infrared spectroscopy I’d imagine, or another spectroscopic technique.
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alinazubairx
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(Original post by Deggs_14)
No, an aromatic compound being combusted would produce lots of soot as there is quite a high carbon to oxygen ratio, or it would take more moles of oxygen than a corresponding alkane and alkene. I haven’t used a “smoky flame” before? If an alkene is present the bromine liquid would react in an electrophilic addition reaction, but aromatic compounds don’t readily undergo electrophilic addition.

If you want to distinguish between alkanes and alkenes then you’d want to use infrared spectroscopy I’d imagine, or another spectroscopic technique.
right. ok, thank you
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