avocado25
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So how do you go from a foundation degree in science to graduating as a Doctor or scientist?
If you know the steps, please share!
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Reality Check
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A doctor is a scientist.
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avocado25
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Hi, I'm stuck on whether to study Chemistry or Biology BSc degree. I like them both but which one do you think will help me the most in the career pathway or when applying for qualifications to become a Doctor or scientist? I was considering biochemistry but I'm not sure.
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ReadingMum
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If you want to be a doctor why not actually apply for Medicine? Maybe I am missing something?
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Sinnoh
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...??
If you want to work as a medical doctor, you have to study medicine. And then do the foundation training after that. Some unis allow you to intercalate a BSc degree within your medicine degree.
If you want to work "as a scientist", what that means in practice is probably full-time research. So you'd have to most likely do a PhD eventually
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avocado25
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(Original post by ReadingMum)
If you want to be a doctor why not actually apply for Medicine? Maybe I am missing i
I'm still unsure if i want to

(Original post by Sinnoh)
...??
If you want to work as a medical doctor, you have to study medicine. And then do the foundation training after that. Some unis allow you to intercalate a BSc degree within your medicine degree.
If you want to work "as a scientist", what that means in practice is probably full-time research. So you'd have to most likely do a PhD eventually
At the moment I wanted to choose between chemistry, biology or Biochemistry BSc just so I can have a broad range of career paths because I'm still unsure but I would definitely want to become some sort of doctor in the end. My question is between Chemistry, biology and Biochemistry which one would you say is best when applying for jobs or masters
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avocado25
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At the moment I wanted to choose between chemistry, biology or Biochemistry BSc just so I can have a broad range of career paths because I'm still unsure but I would definitely want to become some sort of doctor in the end. My question is between Chemistry, biology and Biochemistry which one would you say is best when applying for jobs or masters. I'm currently studying a foundation degree in Biology.
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by avocado25)
I'm still unsure if i want to


At the moment I wanted to choose between chemistry, biology or Biochemistry BSc just so I can have a broad range of career paths because I'm still unsure but I would definitely want to become some sort of doctor in the end. My question is between Chemistry, biology and Biochemistry which one would you say is best when applying for jobs or masters
You can do an undergrad science degree and then apply for medicine, that's known as graduate-entry medicine, but it's much more competitive - and it's already pretty damn competitive to apply normally. So if you're going to do medicine and be a medical doctor, you should decide sooner rather than later. If you're on the fence about it, don't do medicine.
When it comes to what's best for jobs/master's courses, it depends on what you want to do. Biology isn't going to be great if you plan on doing a master's in physical chemistry (probably). Bear in mind that a lot of science graduates do not go into STEM careers - finance, IT, telecoms, management, even law are all options.
If you're just wanting to know about employment prospects, I think chemistry usually has the best out of those three but for the love of god a) verify this for yourself and b) don't let that be the deciding factor.
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ReadingMum
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and be aware that graduate entry degrees often have higher fees and may not qualify for student fee or maintenance loans
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ecolier
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You don't need to create three threads for similar questions - just ask your questions in the same thread and we have the ability to answer multiple questions!

(Original post by avocado25)
So how do you go from a foundation degree in science to graduating as a Doctor or scientist?
If you know the steps, please share!
I don't know about scientists, but as a medical doctor you'll need to either go through
(1) Undergraduate medicine or Medicine with a Foundation Year or
(2) Graduate Entry Medicine.

As stated, GEM is more competitive and it is recommended that those who can, apply via the undergrad medicine route.

(Original post by avocado25)
Hi, I'm stuck on whether to study Chemistry or Biology BSc degree. I like them both but which one do you think will help me the most in the career pathway or when applying for qualifications to become a Doctor or scientist? I was considering biochemistry but I'm not sure.
For graduate entry medicine, it doesn't really matter. There are some medical schools who may even consider gradutes with non-science degrees.

(Original post by avocado25)
At the moment I wanted to choose between chemistry, biology or Biochemistry BSc just so I can have a broad range of career paths because I'm still unsure but I would definitely want to become some sort of doctor in the end. My question is between Chemistry, biology and Biochemistry which one would you say is best when applying for jobs or masters. I'm currently studying a foundation degree in Biology.
This isn't really appropriate for the Medicine forum. It depends on what you want to do career-wise. Many chemistry / biology / biochemistry degree holders do not actually work in the industry.
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ferrus_manus
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(Original post by Reality Check)
A doctor is a scientist.
A scientist in the BSc sense. I would perhaps make it clearer that science as a career encompasses many levels of qualifications and having a step on the ladder does not necessarily equate to being as capable professionally as others who took the full professional route.
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sadasdasfsfafg
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Hey!
if you are applying for medicine as an undergrad, you have the option usually in the 3rd year to "intercalate". What that basically means is that you get an extra degree on top of your medicine degree! for example you can study medicine and also get a bachelors in biochemistry aswell! it doesnt have to be science related aswell, ive seen options for bio engineering and also philosophy and even management studies!
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avocado25
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(Original post by ecolier)
You don't need to create three threads for similar questions - just ask your questions in the same thread and we have the ability to answer multiple questions!



I don't know about scientists, but as a medical doctor you'll need to either go through
(1) Undergraduate medicine or Medicine with a Foundation Year or
(2) Graduate Entry Medicine.

As stated, GEM is more competitive and it is recommended that those who can, apply via the undergrad medicine route.



For graduate entry medicine, it doesn't really matter. There are some medical schools who may even consider gradutes with non-science degrees.



This isn't really appropriate for the Medicine forum. It depends on what you want to do career-wise. Many chemistry / biology / biochemistry degree holders do not actually work in the industry.
(Original post by sadasdasfsfafg)
Hey!
if you are applying for medicine as an undergrad, you have the option usually in the 3rd year to "intercalate". What that basically means is that you get an extra degree on top of your medicine degree! for example you can study medicine and also get a bachelors in biochemistry aswell! it doesnt have to be science related aswell, ive seen options for bio engineering and also philosophy and even management studies!
Does this also work if i was to study a bioscience course such as Chemistry, biology and Biochemistry then once I graduate one of those Bachelor degrees, I could apply for a masters in Medicine? Can i 'intercalate' that way? Or do you know anything similar?
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by avocado25)
Does this also work if i was to study a bioscience course such as Chemistry, biology and Biochemistry then once I graduate one of those Bachelor degrees, I could apply for a masters in Medicine? Can i 'intercalate' that way? Or do you know anything similar?
There is no master's for medicine. GEM takes a minimum of 4 years.
You can do a medicine degree and intercalate a related degree during it, but not the other way around.
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avocado25
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
There is no master's for medicine. GEM takes a minimum of 4 years.
You can do a medicine degree and intercalate a related degree during it, but not the other way around.
I found a course called BSc Medical Bioscience.
https://www.londonmet.ac.uk/courses/...ce---bsc-hons/
Can I study this then apply for medicine without doing a foundation year. This course is 2 years. Also I obtain BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Sciences for A-levels.
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by avocado25)
I found a course called BSc Medical Bioscience.
https://www.londonmet.ac.uk/courses/...ce---bsc-hons/
Can I study this then apply for medicine without doing a foundation year. This course is 2 years. Also I obtain BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Sciences for A-levels.
If you study BSc Medical Bioscience then you would be able to apply for graduate-entry medicine afterwards. But that would be 3 years of that degree + 4 or 5 years of the medicine course, so at least 7 years spent at university. If you just wanted to do medicine in the first place then that would be 5 or 6 years.
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avocado25
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
If you study BSc Medical Bioscience then you would be able to apply for graduate-entry medicine afterwards. But that would be 3 years of that degree + 4 or 5 years of the medicine course, so at least 7 years spent at university. If you just wanted to do medicine in the first place then that would be 5 or 6 years.
With graduating with only a BSc Medical Bioscience degree (without moving forward to study medicine for another 5 or 6 years ) I will be able to work in the pharmaceutical industry, bioanalytical forensics, genetics, health and safety and medical research. Which seems alright. My personal interest is Health and Beauty but mostly health.
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Hype en Ecosse
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(Original post by Reality Check)
A doctor is a scientist.
I vehemently disagree. :') I would be rather embarrassed if anyone described me as a scientist!!

(Original post by avocado25)
Hi, I'm stuck on whether to study Chemistry or Biology BSc degree. I like them both but which one do you think will help me the most in the career pathway or when applying for qualifications to become a Doctor or scientist? I was considering biochemistry but I'm not sure.
If you want to be a doctor you should study an undergraduate degree in medicine!
The rest depends on what kind of scientist you want to be: do you want to do academic research? Work in a factory? Do QA? Design machines or processes? Make medicines? Do field work? Do computer programming? If you're able to answer questions like that, that'll help you narrow down the degree you should do.
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Reality Check
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(Original post by Hype en Ecosse)
I vehemently disagree. :') I would be rather embarrassed if anyone described me as a scientist!!
That’s interesting. Why don’t you feel that a Doctor is first and foremost a scientist? Asking for a friend.
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Hype en Ecosse
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(Original post by Reality Check)
That’s interesting. Why don’t you feel that a Doctor is first and foremost a scientist? Asking for a friend.
1. There's a reason the "as a scientist" role was only added to GMC specifications recently.

2. I do literally no science in my job and follow very little scientific method - and principally engage in a hypothetico-deductive model of reasoning as opposed to a primarily inductive model of reasoning. I see people, ask them a few questions, think of what could be wrong with them, then go through my list and strike things off in order of worst to best with a view to do what is "safest" (for the patient, and for myself medico-legally).
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