During photoelectric effect, is the light shone onto anode, or cathode ? Watch

Missradioactive
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I'm so confused

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Missradioactive
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Sinnoh
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Sinnoh
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Looks like it's liberating electrons from the anode (hence being labelled the target material) which then are attracted towards the cathode
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Missradioactive
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Looks like it's liberating electrons from the anode (hence being labelled the target material) which then are attracted towards the cathode
But there are two different diagrams that I posted

In one diagram, the light is shone onto cathode.

In the other one, it's shone onto anode.

I'm so confused.
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Missradioactive
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Your Local Cat
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Missradioactive)
But there are two different diagrams that I posted

In one diagram, the light is shone onto cathode.

In the other one, it's shone onto anode.

I'm so confused.
Okay I think I figured it out.
The bottom diagram is either using conventional current or is just wrong. The cathode is negatively-charged, so in real life the electrons will flow from the cathode to the anode. In the idealised conventional current (this is what I hate the most about physics) the current flows from positive to negative. I think the bottom diagram is trying to represent it as conventional current, although that kind of falls apart when you have to refer to the flow of electrons.
Problem is that the idea of conventional current (positive to negative) was proposed before the discovery of the electron. Current actually flows from negative to positive if it's comprised of electrons, but for some reason it's not changed because iT's CoNvEnTiOn
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Missradioactive
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
Okay I think I figured it out.
The bottom diagram is either using conventional current or is just wrong. The cathode is negatively-charged, so in real life the electrons will flow from the cathode to the anode. In the idealised conventional current (this is what I hate the most about physics) the current flows from positive to negative. I think the bottom diagram is trying to represent it as conventional current, although that kind of falls apart when you have to refer to the flow of electrons.
Problem is that the idea of conventional current (positive to negative) was proposed before the discovery of the electron. Current actually flows from negative to positive if it's comprised of electrons, but for some reason it's not changed because iT's CoNvEnTiOn
thank you
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