BAA95
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Hello people, I am in my 3rd year of medicine and debating whether I should get that extra degree under my belt. I am no spring chicken, having come to medicine later than most (I'm 24).
The problem is, I am looking to apply for quite a competitive specialty and know the extra letters will be good come ST applications. Of course, it wouldn't just be for credentials - it would be a subject I am interested in and I'd look to publish and get the most out of the year. However, with my age in mind (not to mention finances), how feasible is it to study an Msc during FY1 instead? Any advice would be much appreciated!

P.S. I have no previous degrees.
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Democracy
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(Original post by BAA95)
Hello people, I am in my 3rd year of medicine and debating whether I should get that extra degree under my belt. I am no spring chicken, having come to medicine later than most (I'm 24).
The problem is, I am looking to apply for quite a competitive specialty and know the extra letters will be good come ST applications. Of course, it wouldn't just be for credentials - it would be a subject I am interested in and I'd look to publish and get the most out of the year. However, with my age in mind (not to mention finances), how feasible is it to study an Msc during FY1 instead? Any advice would be much appreciated!

P.S. I have no previous degrees.
Go for it. A year is nothing in the grand scheme of things and 24 is hardly ancient

MSc during FY1 doesn't sound like fun at all. You would need to do it part time and it would take up a lot of your free time in addition to ePortfolio etc. I would do the iBSc now and consider an MSc during an FY3 year while locuming, if you're still interested.
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BAA95
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(Original post by Democracy)
Go for it. A year is nothing in the grand scheme of things and 24 is hardly ancient

MSc during FY1 doesn't sound like fun at all. You would need to do it part time and it would take up a lot of your free time in addition to ePortfolio etc. I would do the iBSc now and consider an MSc during an FY3 year while locuming, if you're still interested.
Thanks for your response. I definitely feel old around some of my year group. Maybe that's more to do with them

Have you intercalated yourself?
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Democracy
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(Original post by BAA95)
Thanks for your response. I definitely feel old around some of my year group. Maybe that's more to do with them

Have you intercalated yourself?
No but I am a GEM graduate and older than you, so trust me when I say 24 is not too old at all
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BAA95
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(Original post by Democracy)
No but I am a GEM graduate and older than you, so trust me when I say 24 is not too old at all
I appreciate your reassurance. Merci
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plrodham1
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(Original post by BAA95)
Hello people, I am in my 3rd year of medicine and debating whether I should get that extra degree under my belt. I am no spring chicken, having come to medicine later than most (I'm 24).
The problem is, I am looking to apply for quite a competitive specialty and know the extra letters will be good come ST applications. Of course, it wouldn't just be for credentials - it would be a subject I am interested in and I'd look to publish and get the most out of the year. However, with my age in mind (not to mention finances), how feasible is it to study an Msc during FY1 instead? Any advice would be much appreciated!

P.S. I have no previous degrees.
As stated 24 is not that old. If you're considering a competitive specialty and you have access to an appropriate intercalated degree then by all means go for it. I imagine a part time MSc during foundation would be miserable, particularly as you'll also be looking towards membership exams and preparing your portfolio for applications.
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BAA95
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(Original post by plrodham1)
As stated 24 is not that old. If you're considering a competitive specialty and you have access to an appropriate intercalated degree then by all means go for it. I imagine a part time MSc during foundation would be miserable, particularly as you'll also be looking towards membership exams and preparing your portfolio for applications.
You're right, perhaps I am being a bit dramatic about my age. Medicine, after all, is a long haul journey.
Thanks for your help, I think I will go for it.
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username4586718
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Go for it. I am way older than you and I am still applying for the medical school.
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Beska
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I would always recommend intercalating, particularly into a masters. It will make a significant impact on your career at every point directly (i.e. points mean prizes), but also in less easy to define ways - better grasp of research, better grasp of higher level of academia, better at presenting, better at writing, etc. etc. Very often people underestimate the difficulty of leaving training to study for a full-time degree ("You can always do a degree later after medical school"). There is a big difference between spending a year longer at medical school whilst you're still in a student house, living like a student, with a student loan, with students around you vs. leaving training, taking a pay cut from 30-50k/year to £0/year whilst still having outgoings that you've become accustomed to on that higher wage (e.g. a mortgage). Funding is easier to come by whilst you're still a med student as well. That said, part time taught masters (3 years) are very doable - often done as certificate over 1 year, diploma over 1 year, masters over 1 year. I have done 2 part-time certificates whilst working and it's fairly easy.

e: I forgot to mention, the age thing doesn't matter. You do you. Medical careers are a marathon (other than FY1, get that **** out of the way immediately).
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BAA95
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(Original post by Beska)
I would always recommend intercalating, particularly into a masters. It will make a significant impact on your career at every point directly (i.e. points mean prizes), but also in less easy to define ways - better grasp of research, better grasp of higher level of academia, better at presenting, better at writing, etc. etc. Very often people underestimate the difficulty of leaving training to study for a full-time degree ("You can always do a degree later after medical school"). There is a big difference between spending a year longer at medical school whilst you're still in a student house, living like a student, with a student loan, with students around you vs. leaving training, taking a pay cut from 30-50k/year to £0/year whilst still having outgoings that you've become accustomed to on that higher wage (e.g. a mortgage). Funding is easier to come by whilst you're still a med student as well. That said, part time taught masters (3 years) are very doable - often done as certificate over 1 year, diploma over 1 year, masters over 1 year. I have done 2 part-time certificates whilst working and it's fairly easy.

e: I forgot to mention, the age thing doesn't matter. You do you. Medical careers are a marathon (other than FY1, get that **** out of the way immediately).
Thanks for your answer, that makes a lot of sense to me
Why do you recommend a Masters in particular? I realise it will probably be more geared towards research than a BSc, but MSc's seem like a lot more of a ball ache to sort out logistically. Also, points-wise, for ST applications at least, the potential for scoring higher lies with BSc's.
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Beska
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(Original post by BAA95)
Thanks for your answer, that makes a lot of sense to me
Why do you recommend a Masters in particular? I realise it will probably be more geared towards research than a BSc, but MSc's seem like a lot more of a ball ache to sort out logistically. Also, points-wise, for ST applications at least, the potential for scoring higher lies with BSc's.
My argument is that if you're going to take a year out of your studies, you might as well gain a qualification that's higher i.e. a masters, verses a BSc. It's true that you get more points for BSc than a masters (which makes literally no sense) and is something they need to change - that's not true if you ever apply for anything down the academic track though.
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BAA95
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(Original post by Beska)
My argument is that if you're going to take a year out of your studies, you might as well gain a qualification that's higher i.e. a masters, verses a BSc. It's true that you get more points for BSc than a masters (which makes literally no sense) and is something they need to change - that's not true if you ever apply for anything down the academic track though.
So if down the line someone wanted to do a higher degree (PhD/MD etc), are they more qualified with an MSc? Or is still open to those with undergrad degrees?
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Beska
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(Original post by BAA95)
So if down the line someone wanted to do a higher degree (PhD/MD etc), are they more qualified with an MSc? Or is still open to those with undergrad degrees?
I was more talking about applying to e.g. AFP, ACF posts. A masters probably helps applying for a fellowship for PhD funding but realistically at that point a BSc/MSc would probably be equivalent and the deciding factors are more your postgraduate research experience.
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nexttime
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I'd definitely intercalate. In general also but definitely if you're aiming for something competitive.

You can do a postgraduate certificate alongside FY1, which can lead to a masters. You can't do a whole masters though!
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BAA95
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(Original post by Beska)
I was more talking about applying to e.g. AFP, ACF posts. A masters probably helps applying for a fellowship for PhD funding but realistically at that point a BSc/MSc would probably be equivalent and the deciding factors are more your postgraduate research experience.
Interesting. I don’t think I’d be in any position to apply for the AFP, ACF with my track record so far, but that’s good to know!
(Original post by nexttime)
I'd definitely intercalate. In general also but definitely if you're aiming for something competitive.

You can do a postgraduate certificate alongside FY1, which can lead to a masters. You can't do a whole masters though!
Thank you for your response. It seems as though there’s a lot more upside to intercalating than not at the moment.
Do you know people who have done any postgraduate certificates during foundation? If so, what were these in?
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nexttime
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(Original post by BAA95)
Interesting. I don’t think I’d be in any position to apply for the AFP, ACF with my track record so far, but that’s good to know!

Thank you for your response. It seems as though there’s a lot more upside to intercalating than not at the moment.
Do you know people who have done any postgraduate certificates during foundation? If so, what were these in?
Yes and medical education mostly. Also clinical research but this was as part of an ACF program.

I wouldn't rule out an ACF based on competitiveness alone, if that's what you mean. You don't need to have loads of publications to apply.
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BAA95
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(Original post by nexttime)
Yes and medical education mostly. Also clinical research but this was as part of an ACF program.

I wouldn't rule out an ACF based on competitiveness alone, if that's what you mean. You don't need to have loads of publications to apply.
Must be great being on AFP/ACF, with all that time to focus on research.

Though I'm talking mainly about my grades. I don't think I would stand a chance!
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