Will a Labour government re-ignite the BNP?

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Arran90
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#1
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One of the most notable features of the previous Labour government to a historian of politics was the rise of the BNP. In 1997 the BNP was a small fringe group with about 300 members at the most that engaged in marches and confrontation in the street, with very little public support. By 2010 it had transformed into a serious and significant political force with two MEPs, one MLA, and numerous councillors throughout England. It had also managed to garner more votes and save more deposits than the Green Party in the 2010 general election.

The BNP collapsed after 2010 but it is not completely dead. It is contesting Hornchurch and Upminster this general election.

Under a Corbyn Labour government one can expect:

Political correctness
Enforced multiculturalism
Promotion of LGBT left right and centre
Mass (open doors) immigration
Pandering to immigrants and ethnic minorities
Cancelled Brexit
A general hatred of ordinary normal white British folk - unless they are LGBT or Ooh Jeremy Corbyn progressives

Do you think this could potentially re-ignite the BNP?
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999tigger
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#2
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#2
(Original post by Arran90)
One of the most notable features of the previous Labour government to a historian of politics was the rise of the BNP. In 1997 the BNP was a small fringe group with about 300 members at the most that engaged in marches and confrontation in the street, with very little public support. By 2010 it had transformed into a serious and significant political force with two MEPs, one MLA, and numerous councillors throughout England. It had also managed to garner more votes and save more deposits than the Green Party in the 2010 general election.

The BNP collapsed after 2010 but it is not completely dead. It is contesting Hornchurch and Upminster this general election.

Under a Corbyn Labour government one can expect:

Political correctness
Enforced multiculturalism
Promotion of LGBT left right and centre
Mass (open doors) immigration
Pandering to immigrants and ethnic minorities
Cancelled Brexit
A general hatred of ordinary normal white British folk - unless they are LGBT or Ooh Jeremy Corbyn progressives

Do you think this could potentially re-ignite the BNP?
No.
You also avoid all the other complex societal factors which resulted in the rise of the BNP. Were they a serious force? Not imo.
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Arran90
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#3
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(Original post by 999tigger)
You also avoid all the other complex societal factors which resulted in the rise of the BNP.
Like what? The only one I didn't specifically mention was Islam which after 9/11 became a prominent driving force.

There was another case of Labour ignoring its 'left behind' heartlands whilst focusing on middle England and London, but the BNP didn't really start taking off in economically depressed white areas where immigration and race relations weren't a big issue until 2005ish.

Were they a serious force? Not imo.
They certainly were one of the big 3 smaller parties in England along with UKIP and the Green Party; larger and more active than any small party in the 1990s; and they did have the establishment worried.
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londonmyst
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No.
The BNP have always been a fringe group of thuggish bad apples who can barely get along with fellow fascists.
They are now consigned to the dustbin of history, along with their ideological ancestors the IFL and BPP.

A small group of opportunistic racists that split from the national front and tried to masquerade as a law abiding political party dedicated to british nationalism, the best they ever achieved was attracting protest votes from the most disenchanted of voters from the main two parties.
With a history of regularly indulging in violent brawls with their ex-pals and being exposed by undercover journalists, they have destroyed themselves with several years of internal spats.

Not even the current shadow cabinet coming to power could save the BNP from sinking into a black hole of their own making.
The biggest challenge for the BNP leader is keeping his claws on the bnp bank accounts and avoiding violent confrontations with the wealthy scumbags that fund those bank accounts.
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username402722
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No as I think that their popularity, such that it was, came about in the period following the expansion of the EU. That is even before you consider how the party has had in-fighting etc.
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Arran90
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#6
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(Original post by londonmyst)
No.
The BNP have always been a fringe group of thuggish bad apples who can barely get along with fellow fascists.
They are now consigned to the dustbin of history, along with their ideological ancestors the IFL and BPP.

A small group of opportunistic racists that split from the national front and tried to masquerade as a law abiding political party dedicated to british nationalism, the best they ever achieved was attracting protest votes from the most disenchanted of voters from the main two parties.
With a history of regularly indulging in violent brawls with their ex-pals and being exposed by undercover journalists, they have destroyed themselves with several years of internal spats.

Not even the current shadow cabinet coming to power could save the BNP from sinking into a black hole of their own making.
The biggest challenge for the BNP leader is keeping his claws on the bnp bank accounts and avoiding violent confrontations with the wealthy scumbags that fund those bank accounts.
The BNP was blighted by internal conflict and crooked leadership but it's hard to deny that nobody in 1997 predicted that they would rise up to the level that they did in 2010. They definitely surpassed the National Front in the 1970s which didn't even manage to elect a single councillor.

Adam Walker is a completely hopeless leader but they could get another Nick Griffin that isn't quite so greedy in the near future...
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Arran90
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#7
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(Original post by barnetlad)
No as I think that their popularity, such that it was, came about in the period following the expansion of the EU. That is even before you consider how the party has had in-fighting etc.
I think it was 7/7 and Islam more so than mass eastern European immigration. Farage was the one who latched onto that one with UKIP.
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