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    There is certainly some ill-feeling towards Muslims in this country.
    There is much more to it than 7/7. Stories like local councils not putting up Xmas lights to avoid offending the local Muslim population etc. , the views taken by some who have been interviewed on TV and in newspapers to the effect that Britain's foreign policy is to blame/provides justification for 7/7, the controversy surrounding what would be the world's biggest mosque and stories like the murder of Kriss Donald have not helped either.

    A lot of people don't dislike Muslims per-se, but do dislike the influence of insular communities based around race. There needs to be more effort at cohesion from both sides.
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    (Original post by Freud)
    I think it's a definite minority who would look at the majority of muslims differently since 7/7. You can't make a connection - they had nothing to do with it! Yet even so, I cannot help feel a bit odd when I see a woman covered from head to foot in black with only her eyes showing.
    hey you guys!
    I am a muslim female who lives in Jordan ( the middle east). I am happy to answer any questions you have regarding my religion and I would try my best to be as accurate as possible.
    As for the perception that women should be dressed in black from head to toe and cover everything except for their eyes. This is not obligatory and is partially wrong. It was mentioned that the wives of prophet's mohammed peace be upon him used to cover their faces, but not all muslim women should. Infact when we go to mecca and face the ka'abah ( the black block in the middle) our face shouldn't be covered! besides women could wear whatever colour they want to wear not blakc only. Islam believes that a woman's body is art and is scared and that it shouldn't be put on display for everyone to see and be tempted by. Thats why women are to wear conservative clotheswhen they are out, can wear whatever they want to wear in their homes around their husbands , dads, brothers, and anyone they are not allowed to marry.
    There is this huge debate in Islam about covering the head " hejab". some strongly believe that wearing a hejab is something obligatory , and others think that it is preferable. So all over the middle east you will find many muslim women who cover their heads, and others that don't. My mom wears a hejab, I personally don't. Partially becuase I am not ready and kind of hesitating, but my parents would never force me to do anything against my will Islam doesn't require them to do so. When I decide to wear the hejab I want to be a woman of stronger faith and be sure of my decision, so that I won't take it off afterwards. Many people have simillar thoughts to mine.
    In other words my religion is all about your individaul relationship with God aka "allah" in muslim vocabulary. And everyone is on his own. Yet parents should encourage their children to pray regulary and fast during the Hold Month of Ramadan in order to plant in them the love of God and their religion.

    I hope this helped a little!
    P.S: feel free to ask my anything, I am more than glad to clear any misconceptions.
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    What are the positive characteristics Muslims see in the Western nations?
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    2 pionts, muslims wearing the veil, the main problem i see witheducated peoploe (lets ignore sun reader), is simply that of social awkwardness, in this day and age we are all completely used to communicating without seeing somebodys face (email, phone, forums like this etc) we are used to communicating without looking at somebody's face. The problem is simply when a women wearing the niqab (veil) comes do i give her eye contact, do i look away, and this awkwardness really goes away quite quickly, and its like making a mountain of a molehill, considering less than 1% of muslim women in britain wear it. As far as the Isalmic ruling is the majority of scholars simply say its a good optional extra (few see it as obligatory), whilst almost all scholars covering the hair a obligatory. Secondly the idea that muslims in this country do nto integrate is just dumb. Sure muslims born in thsi country may not be identical to non-muslims, keeping some aspects of their culture, religious practices etc. you only need to compare a youth brought up here, and say in pakistan to realise the differences they have in language, culture clothes, thinking and everything. Ask yourself this question why is somebody who's 'fresh' stand out and seem so different from a muslim in britain who isnt. In many aspects you see they have blended aspects of the cultures, uniquely.
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    (Original post by Amm0)
    Bah, all I ask is that they stop getting offended over everything. kthx
    As in?

    Regarding Muslim clothing, wearing black is not compulsory, nor is covering the face. But wearing the hijab is, as well as dressing decently.
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    I'm sure some people in this country do feel somewhat intimidated by Muslims much the same way that many people here have negative feelings against Eastern European migrant workers, because they have a fear, wrongly so in my opinion, that their "way of life" is being threatened. With Muslims, it may be that they feel that they should conform to British ways, such as Jack Straw stating how he preferred that Muslim women did not wear veils and just British people in general being unaccustomed to Muslim traditions and feeling somewhat threatened by it.

    After all, there is quite a significant Muslim population in Britain. And then, as the OP mentioned, this was probably exacerbated by the fears of terrorism and extremist actions, which are linked, incorrectly with the majority of the Muslim community, which do not hold such views but just have their own culture and traditions. This is something I feel British people should come to accept, in the same way that migrant workers bring to Britain a wealth of knowledge and expertise.

    We will always see people, such as the BNP over here, or the KKK in the States, who hold radical views against what they perceive to be a threat against their way of life. Acceptance and an understanding of the different religions and cultures will make Britain an acceptable multi-faith, multi-cultural community.
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    Bmoody, positive characterisitcs in western nations, firstly you have the stereotype that muslims see the west as annonomys with evil, or the devil. But this is further from the truth. Whereever you go in the muslim world it will not be hard to find the latest american movies, fashions. As far as positive things in UK. You find many, just like there are many aspects of muslim culture the west can adopt (e.g. the family system is still very strong in muslim comunities). In the West many things are there not present elsewhere: eg the treastment fo the poor, the hard work ethic, treatment of minorities (to a certain affect), a system free from bribery and corruption. Just like every culture it has its negative and postive aspects.
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    Being a muslim is like being pregnant, you can't be moderately pregnant can you?
    Covering the face is a load of nonsense that people came up with. The Qur'an only mentions the hair (neck + ears), arms and legs.

    To be honest this thread is useless in a sense that everyone will try to sound like the good guy that treats everyone equally. As most of the Muslims in the UK know, we are faced with discrimination everyday whether minor or major.

    As for Muslims not socialising with caucasians, many probably won't for a couple of reasons:
    1. They have been through a lot before when dealing with caucasians.
    2. The way of life. Drinking is becoming more and more part of the western culture and a Muslim wouldn't want to be around when that happens. Other things include sex and so on.
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    (Original post by Bmoody)
    What are the positive characteristics Muslims see in the Western nations?
    Education for one I'd say..
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    (Original post by becca2389)
    From experiences in my home country, there's a lot of anti-Muslim feeling simply because of 7/7 and all the images of militant Muslims on the media. I've more than once been highly offended when people have declared, quite unashamedly, that "all Muslims are terrorists". This is probably do with a lack of education...the Muslim community here is small and quite insular so no-one has any perception of Muslims to draw on rather than what they see on the news.

    In London, the perception is a whole lot more positive. The people I associate with are sensible enough to realise that the Muslim militant comes from a very small group of extremists.
    I agree with you.
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    (Original post by Don_Kamikaze)
    To be honest this thread is useless in a sense that everyone will try to sound like the good guy that treats everyone equally. As most of the Muslims in the UK know, we are faced with discrimination everyday whether minor or major.
    I agree with the first part in that posting a thread on a topic like this on TSR is not going to receive posts claiming that, yes, you are a racist bugger and yes you do find Muslims "alien", simply because of the nature of the thread. Now-a-days, everyone is pushed by peer pressure anyway... For example, if someone is doing a charity collection at school, whilst it not being obligatory that you donate, everyone feels that they have to.

    The second part though is mainly fuelled by the media, which constantly spurt out stories of Muslims failing to conform to British traditions and extremist/terrorist activity which is linked, somewhat subtlety, to Muslims. Although, I doubt that the discrimination you face is as serious as you suggest as being faced with it "everyday". There will always be people who feel that way towards Muslims, in every society... but I'm sure it's not that serious.
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    (Original post by In1Su)

    Let me tell you about a friend of mine's. He was the only Muslim in his English class and was bullied severely. Girls would try to undermine his confidence and make fun of him (calling him ugly etc), namecalling towards him in the class was usual. He was once explicitly asked (the whole class watching) if he "ate anything except curry". This went on for 3 years. The teacher would not even stop it.

    Now this would have been a different story had there only been one person doing this, but it was most of the class. Now, isn't he justified in ignoring all other Caucasian Brits and sticking to his own community?
    No it's not bloody justified! I'm not condoning the bullying by any means (it sounds appalling) but there is no reason for him to think that all white people in eng are racist, ignorant biggots, just because his class mates gave him a hard time. I was reading something the other day about this ginger kid who got bullied by a load of asian people in his school and had to be moved, does this mean that for the rest of his life he should only mix with white people? it's the same kind of scenerio.
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    http://www.channel4.com/video/brandl...houldnt-happen
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    (Original post by imtired)
    The current image is definitely a product of the media, which is why i agree that it's based on ignorance, and i don't think the london bombings has that much of an effect, i think the main cause is what happened after 9/11.
    True, but I'd say that the behaviour of certain sections of the Muslim community in response to e.g. the Mohammed cartoons, Pope Benedict's lecture at Regensburg and etc, have also fuelled a lot of resentment. Many people, tied in with their worries about immigration, feel that certain groups in society e.g. Muslims, are offered 'extra' rights and that the media bends-over backwards to cater to this group.
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    Little bit off topic here, but that avatar you have, 2026, is making me real dizzy lol :woo:
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    I don't know why the Hijab has a negative image. That's a doublestandard. I mean, a woman who wears the hijab covers pratically all of the parts of the body as a nun. And nuns don't have a negative image. In fact, it's quite normal to see one, compared to a muslim wearing a hijab. I am not including the veil, because that's not compulsary to wear.
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    (Original post by Toiletpaper8)
    Little bit off topic here, but that avatar you have, 2026, is making me real dizzy lol :woo:
    Lol, well I suspect it was created with that in mind - to distract people and get them all dizzy.
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    (Original post by musti123)
    Bmoody, positive characterisitcs in western nations, firstly you have the stereotype that muslims see the west as annonomys with evil, or the devil. But this is further from the truth. Whereever you go in the muslim world it will not be hard to find the latest american movies, fashions. As far as positive things in UK. You find many, just like there are many aspects of muslim culture the west can adopt (e.g. the family system is still very strong in muslim comunities). In the West many things are there not present elsewhere: eg the treastment fo the poor, the hard work ethic, treatment of minorities (to a certain affect), a system free from bribery and corruption. Just like every culture it has its negative and postive aspects.
    Thanks for the response Musti. I wanted to know what Muslims found positive in the West because we never hear that side. We always hear about loathing from Muslims, but knowing what Muslims like about us can be quite helpful in mending the cultural divide.
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    (Original post by Sk1lLz)
    I don't know why the Hijab has a negative image. That's a doublestandard. I mean, a woman who wears the hijab covers pratically all of the parts of the body as a nun. And nuns don't have a negative image. In fact, it's quite normal to see one, compared to a muslim wearing a hijab.
    Perhaps because people think most pursue life as a nun as entirely voluntary, as oppose to the hijab which may be directly or indirectly forced upon certain women. Just a thought.

    Note, I'm not saying that it is 'forced', though I'm sure that there are women whom it's forced upon. I'm just referring to possible perceptions.

    (Original post by Sk1ILz)
    I am not including the veil, because that's not compulsory to wear.
    As far as many Muslims are concerned, neither is the hijab compulsory. To others, the veil is compulsory.
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    (Original post by Toiletpaper8)
    The second part though is mainly fuelled by the media, which constantly spurt out stories of Muslims failing to conform to British traditions and extremist/terrorist activity which is linked, somewhat subtlety, to Muslims. Although, I doubt that the discrimination you face is as serious as you suggest as being faced with it "everyday". There will always be people who feel that way towards Muslims, in every society... but I'm sure it's not that serious.
    Yes it's not that serious.

    Having people refer to you as "the terrorist" is not serious at all.
    Having your senior tutor saying that plagiarism is part of your culture is not serious at all.
    Having people throw garbage in front of your door and write rubbish on it is not serious at all.
    Getting a "random" extra screening whenever you are flying is not serious either.

    Please, do not make a claim without knowing anything about it.
 
 
 
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