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    How much poetry is involved in A Level English Language?
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    (Original post by rapha)
    How much poetry is involved in A Level English Language?
    There is no poetry on any of the A Level English Language syllabuses as such, but material on the synoptic and textual analysis papers can be based upon any type of text. However, it's incredibly unlikely that you would get asked to comment on poems (extracts are largely taken from newspapers, journals and so on) and even if you were, it would be specific language analysis rather than the English Literature approach.
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    (Original post by Wildebeest)
    There is no poetry on any of the A Level English Language syllabuses as such, but material on the synoptic and textual analysis papers can be based upon any type of text. However, it's incredibly unlikely that you would get asked to comment on poems (extracts are largely taken from newspapers, journals and so on) and even if you were, it would be specific language analysis rather than the English Literature approach.
    OK. I was just wondering because I actually considered picking it for my A Levels (maybe for AS in my second year) but I dont really like poetry so Im glad to know that there isn't any involved.
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    In our school for English A level you have 6 English lessons a week and 1 poetry lesson. We're doing IGCSE though.
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    I will warn you English Language A-level is nothing like the GCSE. I have just completed an AS in it and it mainly involves studying grammar, analysing (mainly non-fictional) texts, analysing transcripts and looking at the more theoretical elements of the language, i.e the way in which men and women speak, and why they speak in the way they do.
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    (Original post by UltimateJ)
    I will warn you English Language A-level is nothing like the GCSE. I have just completed an AS in it and it mainly involves studying grammar, analysing (mainly non-fictional) texts, analysing transcripts and looking at the more theoretical elements of the language, i.e the way in which men and women speak, and why they speak in the way they do.
    It's also interesting, compared to the GCSE which was dull as hell.
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    (Original post by Fran Katzenjammer)
    It's also interesting, compared to the GCSE which was dull as hell.
    Yh, I also found GCSE English quite dull. If I take AS English Language in my second year, I hope I enjoy it.
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    (Original post by Fran Katzenjammer)
    It's also interesting, compared to the GCSE which was dull as hell.
    I found some of it to be highly interesting and fun to learn, yet some parts horrifically boring and pointless... :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by UltimateJ)
    I found some of it to be highly interesting and fun to learn, yet some parts horrifically boring and pointless... :rolleyes:
    Yeah, there's a bit of a mix. Some parts aaare really dull, but I find most of it very interesting.
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    (Original post by Fran Katzenjammer)
    Yeah, there's a bit of a mix. Some parts aaare really dull, but I find most of it very interesting.
    Yup.

    By the way, to anyone considering taking it, I will say in terms of work-load it is fairly easy. There really is not much in the way of knowledge you need for each exam, as long as you know everything inside out, and can apply it to the different texts/essay questions you will do fine.
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    None

    at my school anyway... that is Literature surely :confused:
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    (Original post by Fran Katzenjammer)
    Yeah, there's a bit of a mix. Some parts aaare really dull, but I find most of it very interesting.
    For me the most interesting parts was writing for different purposes and for different audiences, speacially the media text (was one mark off an A* in my media text coursework).
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    (Original post by UltimateJ)
    Yup.

    By the way, to anyone considering taking it, I will say in terms of work-load it is fairly easy. There really is not much in the way of knowledge you need for each exam, as long as you know everything inside out, and can apply it to the different texts/essay questions you will do fine.
    Yeah, I literally did no revision for my AS because my Psychology was on the same day, and that requires a ton of revision.

    Whether that no revision was wise... we'll find out.
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    Oh please take note, that it's considered slightly inferior to English Literature by some unis.
    (I'm not ****ging it off myself, I'm doing LangLit)
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    (Original post by gee_shakedown)
    Oh please take note, that it's considered slightly inferior to English Literature by some unis.
    (I'm not ****ging it off myself, I'm doing LangLit)
    That's true if you're doing Lit. They couldn't care less whether you took Lang.
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    no poetry at all. i still enjoy it though so i'm taking it at uni with linguistics
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    (Original post by Fran Katzenjammer)
    Yeah, I literally did no revision for my AS because my Psychology was on the same day, and that requires a ton of revision.

    Whether that no revision was wise... we'll find out.
    But do you have natural ability or did you work hard in class? Or was it a mixture of both? Because I have a friend who doesnt try hard at all and ALWAYS gets an A* for every single piece of English coursework and every exam. It just comes naturally for her. Im not like that...
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    none at all. it's completely different to english at GCSE.
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    (Original post by rapha)
    But do you have natural ability or did you work hard in class? Or was it a mixture of both? Because I have a friend who doesnt try hard at all and ALWAYS gets an A* for every single piece of English coursework and every exam. It just comes naturally for her. Im not like that...
    I didn't work that hard for Lang, I just... did it.

    I got mostly Bs, so here's hoping for a B. I'd be unhappy with a C, and thrilled and disbelieving if I got an A. :p:
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    (Original post by gee_shakedown)
    Oh please take note, that it's considered slightly inferior to English Literature by some unis.
    (I'm not ****ging it off myself, I'm doing LangLit)
    Again, I'm not trying to argue with you, but I think one of the reasons many people on this forum assume its regarded as inferior to lit is simply because under the entry requirements for English Lit many Unis have "English languge is not acceptable". This is because the degree is English lit, not lang. If the degree was English Language or Linguistics I'm sure it wouldn't be regarded as an "inferior" subject. Sheffield for example, a very reputable university, accept Eng lang or Eng lit for their English Language and Literature degree. Furthermore, they require it for their English Language degree (or evidence of interest in language - probs because lang tends to be offered less in schools).

    For example, If you were applying for a degree in physics, a university would make physics a requirement, chemistry would not be acceptable as a replacement, that doesn't mean chemistry is inferior to physics, its just not the most relevant subject.
 
 
 

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