Loves, Labour's lost

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tenacity
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#1
Report Thread starter 11 months ago
#1
Corbyn has led Labour to its worst defeat since 1935. In 1983, Michael Foot's 'longest suicide note in history' resulted in the party winning just 209 seats. Corbyn first took his seat in that election. Last night, his Labour Party won just 203 seats. For years, people have been insisting on the inevitability of this outcome.

Despite what Corbynites and the Labour leadership have been saying, this result was not primarily determined by Brexit. Multiple opinion polls have demonstrated that what overwhelmingly repelled voters from voting Labour was the leadership.

And who can blame them?

He insisted on policies which are unwinnable in this country. He attempted to side-step this by offering to improve the lives of ordinary working people, without ever attempting the crucial task of defeating the misplaced but persistent reputation Labour has for fiscal irresponsibility.

An able campaigner, he wholeheartedly failed to direct his talents towards persuading Labour supporters to vote to Remain in the EU referendum. In this respect, he is arguably more responsible than anyone else for Leave's victory in that referendum. In this election, he invited ridicule from all sides by refusing to say whether he would support Leave or Remain in the event of the second referendum he proposed.

He lost the last election and did not resign.

He sustained an ongoing anti-semitism crisis, which has led to Labour becoming effectively divorced from long-standing Jewish supporters and viewed with suspicion by the general public.

Despite never being treated like this while constantly rebelling against previous leaders, he tolerated the culling of Labour members and figures with whom he disagreed, as well as the repeated threat to de-select similarly troublesome MPs. He idly watched as talent walked away from the Parliamentary Party, and stubbornly refused to make changes to stop or reverse this exodus.

He has refused, throughout his leadership, to adapt to criticism, to appeal to the floating voter, or to compromise with different factions in his party.

Even in the aftermath of electoral disaster, he continues to live in Momentum's parallel universe, in which inconvenient facts and opposing viewpoints are invisible. He believes he did everything he could, and that he isn't really to blame for the result at all. He has even refused to resign immediately, and plans to stay in position ostensibly until a new leader is found. Predictably, the Corbyn camp are rumoured to want Rebecca Long-Bailey, or another Corbynite, to succeed him.

He is the single feeblest leader of any political party this country has ever seen, and yet he has been repeatedly enabled to keep that position by a substantial cohort of passionately loyal Labour members. Corbyn and Momentum have propelled Labour to electoral oblivion and all but ensured that the vulnerable people which Labour exists to defend will be shafted by the Tories for a further 10 years.

What lessons should we learn from this?

Perhaps we should learn to elect an open Marxist who will be distrusted by the public and torn to pieces by the Murdoch press.

To elect somebody with the charisma of a urinary tract infection, who basks in the self-regard of not paying any attention to how they appear to and are perceived by the media and the electorate.

To elect somebody with zero policy-making acumen, who is oblivious to the need to accommodate the will of the electorate, and neither knows nor cares whether the policies they select can be sold to a sufficient number of voters.

To elect somebody who will continue to meet with known holocaust deniers, who will accept payments from regimes which throw homosexuals off building sites, and who will lay wreaths at the graves of murdering fanatics.

To elect somebody who will cower in a besieged, sound-proof stronghold filled with instagram selfies and protest marches and buttressed by the endless reinforcements of drunken, ill-informed festival goers and privileged, virtue-signalling students for whom the outcome of a Labour defeat is a sense of valiance at having tried anyway, rather than not feeding their kids or heating their homes.

Alternatively, the lesson might be to pay attention to history and to face reality. If you want a Labour government, choose a winning leader and compromise on your precious principles. If you want a Tory government, which will not compromise with you at all, which will hurt the lives of ordinary people, and which will be in power for decades, then make the same mistakes
over,
and over,
and over again.
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londonmyst
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#2
Report 11 months ago
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Agree with most of your post.

But Corbyn is not the single feeblest leader of any political party this country has ever seen.
Menzies Campbell, Peter Robinson, Neil Kinnock, John Major, Ian Duncan Smith, Vince Cable, Ed Miliband, Neville Chamberlain, Stanley Baldwin and Jim Callaghan- immediately come to mind.
They were either equally feeble or worse than Corbyn.
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