Studentboy783
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So I’m curious if you do a modern languages degree what does it involve. By this I mean:
- what types of classes do you have (for example Grammar, Speaking etc)
- what do each of these classes involve (for example what would a Speaking class involve you doing In tens of what’s covered, what notes you take etc)
- what does a workload contain (for example do you get set translations, essays, grammar exercises etc)
- how many of your lectures are in the language and how many are in English
If anyone who does a languages degree could answer these with any other details that may be worth knowing that would be much appreciated. Also final question
Would you recommend a languages degree
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University of Bath
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(Original post by Studentboy783)
So I’m curious if you do a modern languages degree what does it involve. By this I mean:
- what types of classes do you have (for example Grammar, Speaking etc)
- what do each of these classes involve (for example what would a Speaking class involve you doing In tens of what’s covered, what notes you take etc)
- what does a workload contain (for example do you get set translations, essays, grammar exercises etc)
- how many of your lectures are in the language and how many are in English
If anyone who does a languages degree could answer these with any other details that may be worth knowing that would be much appreciated. Also final question
Would you recommend a languages degree
Hi!

I'm studying Spanish and ab initio Italian at Bath and a currently on my placement year.

Each year I've studied 5 modules:
- Spanish language
- Spanish History and Culture from 20th century (1st year)/Latin American studies (2nd year)
- Italian language
- Italian history and culture from the 20th century
- European studies

For the language modules, they consisted of about 5 hours a week, separated into grammar, speaking, reading, and listening (1st year)/translation (2nd year Spanish). We'd be expected to do at least an hour of follow up work from these classes, although a lot of this work wouldn't be marked, just like in other courses lecturers can't check everyone has done the reading - but it does show in end of term assessments. The language classes are all in the target language.

In terms of the history and content modules, we had two hours of lectures in each module per week, and in the 2nd semester an hour of seminars every other week. We are expected to do the reading for both lectures and seminars. Spanish lectures and seminars are entirely in Spanish (which is something really unique to Bath). Since I started Italian from beginners, lectures will only be in Italian from 4th year.

If you're passionate about languages and already put work into them outside of school I'd definitely recommend it. You also need to have an interest in the history and culture of the country as this is a big part of the learning of languages in university. I've really enjoyed my experience, if you have any questions about languages at Bath, check out our forum, and if you're interested in more about languages at uni, I've written a thread! Please feel free to ask any other questions !
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louisemae2000
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(Original post by Studentboy783)
So I’m curious if you do a modern languages degree what does it involve. By this I mean:
- what types of classes do you have (for example Grammar, Speaking etc)
- what do each of these classes involve (for example what would a Speaking class involve you doing In tens of what’s covered, what notes you take etc)
- what does a workload contain (for example do you get set translations, essays, grammar exercises etc)
- how many of your lectures are in the language and how many are in English
If anyone who does a languages degree could answer these with any other details that may be worth knowing that would be much appreciated. Also final question
Would you recommend a languages degree
I'm in first year and I'm studying Mandarin Chinese accelerated beginners and international relations and this is what it's been like for me so far

- I have 6 hours of Chinese classes a week
- 1 hour of grammar/language exercises (e.g listening and writing)
- 1 hour of conversation/speaking
- 4 hours of general Chinese learning (e.g vocabulary, language exercises, sentences, grammar)
- Grammar classes involve learning sentence structures, language rules etc.
- Conversation classes generally involve practising what we've learnt that week in a smaller group with our lecturer, and learning to speak better and do more impromptu conversations instead of a set, practised routine conversation. It's a lot less structured.
- The general classes involve both grammar, and conversation, along with learning all the vocabulary, set sentences, things like that. We also do exercises such as writing, reading, speaking, listening etc.
- The notes I take include extra words my lecturer tells us, the basic sentences and vocab, any new grammar rules, whatever practice work/questions we have done
- The workload for my class is quite small at the moment, generally just character/vocab sheets, practice translations, however, I know that in my friends Spanish classes, they have essays set a lot in their target language
- My lecturer speaks in English as it's beginners but I know that as of next year, my lectures will be in Chinese and they will only speak English to clarify something if we can't understand the Chinese or if we haven't learnt it before.

My Chinese degree is split into 2 modules
Chinese Language
Chinese Studies (culture, history, geography)

I do about 8 hours of Chinese outside of lectures but by the end of the year, we're expected to do 18. 3 hours for every 1 hour of lecture time.

Most language degrees also offer the opportunity to study in your target language's country for a year, after your first or second year!

For example, in my third year, I get to study in 1 of 3 universities in China for the entire year!

I've never studied Chinese before and so far, I have loved it!

Taking a language degree depends on the career you want in the future.
Many people assume that the only jobs you can get with a language degree are things like teaching and working abroad but there are so many careers out there where a language degree can be really useful!
If you are passionate about languages and willing to put in the effort required, it can be incredibly rewarding!

I hope this has helped and if you have any other questions, feel free to message me
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