grade 8/9 science revision techniques Watch

izrevision
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need science revision technique recommendations
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izrevision
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anyone ??
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casabonita
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used seneca until i literally had it all memorised and that got me 9s in triple science
i'd say use seneca until you're very strong with all the basic knowledge, then try exam questions (cgp white workbooks are great). this way you can then learn what the mark scheme wants and how to structure your answers.
closer to then time, use past papers too see what type of mark you'd be getting, so you can focus on your weaknesses! good luck
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izrevision
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thank you, would you say to get the grade 9 you need to know all the high terminology etc or is it just about knowing the necessary basic knowledge?
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indiamycat
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I got a 9 in biology, chemistry and physics and am taking bio and chem at A level:
Blurt - so so helpful. Watch unjadedjade's video on youtube on it
Practice questions - physics and maths tutor is good!
Question flashcards - you can test yourself and others can test you!

Good luck!
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casabonita
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(Original post by izrevision)
thank you, would you say to get the grade 9 you need to know all the high terminology etc or is it just about knowing the necessary basic knowledge?
since the grade boundaries have been quite low for the sciences (all below 75%), i only really needed to know all the basic knowledge of everything. however, i'd say make sure to learn all practical thoroughly as these are usually 6 markers! and make sure to practice other exam questions too, as this will help build on your knowledge a lot.

obviously try and learn as much of the spec as possible, buttttt if ur a bit of a procrastinator like me and want to do it the lazy when, seneca is the way to go
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izrevision
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(Original post by casabonita)
since the grade boundaries have been quite low for the sciences (all below 75%), i only really needed to know all the basic knowledge of everything. however, i'd say make sure to learn all practical thoroughly as these are usually 6 markers! and make sure to practice other exam questions too, as this will help build on your knowledge a lot.

obviously try and learn as much of the spec as possible, buttttt if ur a bit of a procrastinator like me and want to do it the lazy when, seneca is the way to go
Thanks - do you write out notes or do you think it's a waste of time?
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redmeercat
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I got all 9s in science, and I pretty much did the same thing all the way through:

1. Identify the sub-topic that I understood least for the science I was revising. E.g. Electrolysis.
2. Use my revision guide to identify all key knowledge such as equations, properties, etc
3. write out the information in a different way.
4. Check and add anything I missed.
5. Go through an example question that has already been answered within the revison guide, ensure I understand everything that is ging on and why each step has been taken to get the answer.
6. Do a page of practice questions.
7. Mark practice questions HARSHLY.
8.1: If I got over 90%, I'd do another practice question a couple of hours later or the enxt day to ensure that i remembered it, but otherwise leave it.
8.2: If I got 70-90% I'd go over the specific things I got wrong and rewrite answers with the specification. I'd then do 1-2 other questions of the same type as the ones I got wrong.
8.3: If I got under 70%, it was back to the drawing board. I'd use the internet to do additional research, watch videos etc. To memorise difficult information, I'd use flashcards. Finally, I'd do some more questions and repeat step 8.


Edit:
I used this brand of revision guide/ revision workbook combo https://www.amazon.co.uk/REVISE-EDEX...6345282&sr=8-1 but anything to your specification made by the exam board should be fine. Past papers are also great, but I saved those for easter when I needed to know what I desparately needed to go over.
Last edited by redmeercat; 1 month ago
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casabonita
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(Original post by izrevision)
Thanks - do you write out notes or do you think it's a waste of time?
i think it depends on the type of learner you are tbh... for me it was a waste of time because id just mindlessly be copying my other notes (plus it takes soo long and is so tedious as well)
for specific topics you find difficult, id say writing decent notes would be helpful tho! just dont rewrite out the whole spec like some people ik did, it was totally pointless as they spent more time making it pretty than actually taking in the information.
most helpful is definitely practicing exam questions even if you answer them in note form, it helps sooo much
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izrevision
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(Original post by redmeercat)
I got all 9s in science, and I pretty much did the same thing all the way through:

1. Identify the sub-topic that I understood least for the science I was revising. E.g. Electrolysis.
2. Use my revision guide to identify all key knowledge such as equations, properties, etc
3. write out the information in a different way.
4. Check and add anything I missed.
5. Go through an example question that has already been answered within the revison guide, ensure I understand everything that is ging on and why each step has been taken to get the answer.
6. Do a page of practice questions.
7. Mark practice questions HARSHLY.
8.1: If I got over 90%, I'd do another practice question a couple of hours later or the enxt day to ensure that i remembered it, but otherwise leave it.
8.2: If I got 70-90% I'd go over the specific things I got wrong and rewrite answers with the specification. I'd then do 1-2 other questions of the same type as the ones I got wrong.
8.3: If I got under 70%, it was back to the drawing board. I'd use the internet to do additional research, watch videos etc. To memorise difficult information, I'd use flashcards. Finally, I'd do some more questions and repeat step 8.


Edit:
I used this brand of revision guide/ revision workbook combo https://www.amazon.co.uk/REVISE-EDEX...6345282&sr=8-1 but anything to your specification made by the exam board should be fine. Past papers are also great, but I saved those for easter when I needed to know what I desparately needed to go over.
wow thanks this is very useful - so you don't think its worth writing out a load of notes unless its blurting?
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redmeercat
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(Original post by izrevision)
wow thanks this is very useful - so you don't think its worth writing out a load of notes unless its blurting?
Not really... I would make flashcards of anyhting that I just couldn't remember... I definitely made some for the mestrual cycle with all the hormones etc, but when you just make notes it's very easy just to copy down words without thinking about what you're doing. For science, the main thing is learning knowledge in the context of exam questions, so essentially you can use your reivsion workbook as revision notes, especially as it shows you wht you naturally find more difficult!
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izrevision
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Ok thank you
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CoffeeAndPolitics
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(Original post by izrevision)
need science revision technique recommendations
Not personally best placed to give revision techniques for Science but what redmeercat said is useful. In terms of resources, I recommend freesciencelessons and Primrose Kitten on YouTube and Seneca Learning.
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izrevision
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Also do you need to know each practical in depth for 6 markers eg the exact volume of a solution ?
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BosslyGaming
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(Original post by izrevision)
Also do you need to know each practical in depth for 6 markers eg the exact volume of a solution ?
There's no defined figure which you need to know for a practical - as long as you can put down a reasonable figure then you're fine.
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BosslyGaming
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You need to know a detailed method in a logical order and be able to evaluate (explain) stages - but not specific volumes.
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