Urgent help need with geography question plssss

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fenellaxxx
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I need some urgent help on an A level tectonics question if anyone can help me PLSSSSS it would be much appreciated!!!!

The question is “asses the relationship between the location of different tectonic hazards and their degree of severity” (12)

IM SO STUCK PLS SOMEONE HELP MEEEE IF YOU CAN THANK YOU SO MUCH
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Ðeggs
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Well the extent of severity of a hazard can be defined by the extent of the hazard itself, so it’s magnitude in the Richter scale/ Mercali scale etc, but can also be defined as the impacts on people, so how many deaths caused, economic cost of infrastructural damage etc. Depends on scale or the factors of the earthquake you’re interested in.

There are very high magnitude earthquakes, but they occur in very sparsely populated areas, and so their socio-economic impacts are minimal, such as an earthquake in Patagonia or Alaska. But then a minor or medium magnitude earthquake occurring in a dense urban area with high population densities can have devastating impacts, think Sichuan in China or Kathmandu in Nepal.

Overall the degree of the severity of an earthquake is largely determined by the location where the focus is, an urban area or a rural area etc. But the level of socio-economic development and political development of a country is also important in determining the severity. In Japan the population is more prepared as there are earthquake drills taught in schools from a young age, and there is more capital to invest in earthquake resistant building design. But think Nepal, might have the same population but poverty and poor building design leave the population much more vulnerable and less resilient, so magnitude of the earthquake may be the same, but the social and economic impacts will be different. So the human environment of the earthquake is important too.
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hannahwrighttx
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(Original post by fenellaxxx)
I need some urgent help on an A level tectonics question if anyone can help me PLSSSSS it would be much appreciated!!!!

The question is “asses the relationship between the location of different tectonic hazards and their degree of severity” (12)

IM SO STUCK PLS SOMEONE HELP MEEEE IF YOU CAN THANK YOU SO MUCH
(Original post by Deggs_14)
Well the extent of severity of a hazard can be defined by the extent of the hazard itself, so it’s magnitude in the Richter scale/ Mercali scale etc, but can also be defined as the impacts on people, so how many deaths caused, economic cost of infrastructural damage etc. Depends on scale or the factors of the earthquake you’re interested in.

There are very high magnitude earthquakes, but they occur in very sparsely populated areas, and so their socio-economic impacts are minimal, such as an earthquake in Patagonia or Alaska. But then a minor or medium magnitude earthquake occurring in a dense urban area with high population densities can have devastating impacts, think Sichuan in China or Kathmandu in Nepal.

Overall the degree of the severity of an earthquake is largely determined by the location where the focus is, an urban area or a rural area etc. But the level of socio-economic development and political development of a country is also important in determining the severity. In Japan the population is more prepared as there are earthquake drills taught in schools from a young age, and there is more capital to invest in earthquake resistant building design. But think Nepal, might have the same population but poverty and poor building design leave the population much more vulnerable and less resilient, so magnitude of the earthquake may be the same, but the social and economic impacts will be different. So the human environment of the earthquake is important too.
Completely agree with this, I would also draw on the risk equation. Risk = (magnitude/frequency x vulnerability) / capacity to cope. So, you can give a variety of examples, e.g. if two places had the same frequency and vulnerability but one had a higher capacity to cope, they are at lower risk. You could mention how some places differ for each part of the risk equation and how that would impact them.
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