WhiteKoala
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I want to apply for biomedical engineering, but both of the Universities seem to have very good courses. I had the chance to visit Strathclyde, but not Glasgow.
Could someone give me some insight to help me decide please? Thank you!
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Em.-.
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Being a Russell Group uni, Glasgow is more prestigious if u care about that. Some employers do make judgements based on the uni u attended however if u like the look of Strathclyde more then go there. Just go where u think u will be happiest.
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archie23
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(Original post by Emiluu)
Being a Russell Group uni, Glasgow is more prestigious if u care about that. Some employers do make judgements based on the uni u attended however if u like the look of Strathclyde more then go there. Just go where u think u will be happiest.
Russsel Group is becoming quite irrelevant nowadays considering the likes of st andrews, bath and strathclyde arent in them. Generally speaking strathclyde is better than glasgow for engineering among other courses but for for biomed this could be different. Id recommend emailing the GU biomed department to ask for more information on the course or to even visit the facilities and compare the two on that basis. Both are great unis nonetheless so no decision is a wrong decision.
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Max1989
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I'm a 1st year student studying Prosthetics and Orthotics at Strath (so this might a be slightly biased but I did apply for biomedical engineering, but chose strath rather than Glasgow. mainly for the feel of the departments/uni and course content, I was very interested is prosthetics..well I chose the clinical route in the end)

Strathclyde is getting brand new facilities some time next year, probably before you arrive (if you do go).

Course wise they are pretty much the same, both are triple accredited, so the only difference is the russell group aspect (although Strath is very good in all engineering sectors so again this doesn't really matter as much as the Strath name is highly respected).

I'd try and go to a Glasgow open day, they have one in March for offer holders so if you keep them as an option you should get this opportunity, I personally aren't a fan of the campus (the Glasgow one feels quote spread out whereas straths is a campus fell in the heart of the city).

I'd definitely email both Uni's. have a look at the course content as well to see what you are interested in as electives vary from Uni to Uni qute massively depending on the lecturers specializations, for instance Strath has a lot on Prosthetics and Gait as they are one of only two uni's to supply a allied health degree in that sector.

WIsh you good luck!
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not_margherita
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(Original post by Max1989)
I'm a 1st year student studying Prosthetics and Orthotics at Strath (so this might a be slightly biased but I did apply for biomedical engineering, but chose strath rather than Glasgow. mainly for the feel of the departments/uni and course content, I was very interested is prosthetics..well I chose the clinical route in the end)

Strathclyde is getting brand new facilities some time next year, probably before you arrive (if you do go).

Course wise they are pretty much the same, both are triple accredited, so the only difference is the russell group aspect (although Strath is very good in all engineering sectors so again this doesn't really matter as much as the Strath name is highly respected).

I'd try and go to a Glasgow open day, they have one in March for offer holders so if you keep them as an option you should get this opportunity, I personally aren't a fan of the campus (the Glasgow one feels quote spread out whereas straths is a campus fell in the heart of the city).

I'd definitely email both Uni's. have a look at the course content as well to see what you are interested in as electives vary from Uni to Uni qute massively depending on the lecturers specializations, for instance Strath has a lot on Prosthetics and Gait as they are one of only two uni's to supply a allied health degree in that sector.

WIsh you good luck!
Hello. I got an unconditional offer for MSc Biomedical engineering from both University of Strathclyde and the University of Glasgow. I'm confused. I know Glasgow has better overall ranking but Starthclyde is renowned for engineering and medical fields of study. As an international student, where do I have better job prospects? And what are the advantages of biomedical at strathclyde/glasgow. If anyone can help me out, I'd be so obliged. Thank you!
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Max1989
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(Original post by not_margherita)
Hello. I got an unconditional offer for MSc Biomedical engineering from both University of Strathclyde and the University of Glasgow. I'm confused. I know Glasgow has better overall ranking but Starthclyde is renowned for engineering and medical fields of study. As an international student, where do I have better job prospects? And what are the advantages of biomedical at strathclyde/glasgow. If anyone can help me out, I'd be so obliged. Thank you!
Hi, sorry for slow reply I rarely go on here anymore but still get notifications, but here's my view.

Obviously I'm just a 1st year P&O student (well 2nd year now with what's going on now) but both Uni's offer good courses and are both triple accredited, so really your job prospects are the same if you leave with a degree from either one. Both are good Uni's, so what I'd recommend is look at the course structure, as every Uni depending on their teaching staff will specialise into different areas, from just looking it seems Glasgow is more biology based, with more bioengineering disciplines, whereas Strath seems more 'engineering' with more devices and machine electives. I personally would choose strath's as although I love biology I find it cool designing something out of inorganic materials that will help someone rather than trying to grow lab organic ones. But it's completely up to your preference. I can't really say any advantages and disadvantages as I do not go to Glasgow, what kinda thing do you want to specialise in?
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not_margherita
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(Original post by Max1989)
Hi, sorry for slow reply I rarely go on here anymore but still get notifications, but here's my view.

Obviously I'm just a 1st year P&O student (well 2nd year now with what's going on now) but both Uni's offer good courses and are both triple accredited, so really your job prospects are the same if you leave with a degree from either one. Both are good Uni's, so what I'd recommend is look at the course structure, as every Uni depending on their teaching staff will specialise into different areas, from just looking it seems Glasgow is more biology based, with more bioengineering disciplines, whereas Strath seems more 'engineering' with more devices and machine electives. I personally would choose strath's as although I love biology I find it cool designing something out of inorganic materials that will help someone rather than trying to grow lab organic ones. But it's completely up to your preference. I can't really say any advantages and disadvantages as I do not go to Glasgow, what kinda thing do you want to specialise in?
Hello! Thank you so much for replying. I'm more into engineering than biology as well. I'm a computer science grad who really got into biomedical devices. And I love the course structure and modules at strathclyde. In fact, I really want to go there. But I felt like maybe I was too biased because I love everything about Strathclyde so much that I felt like I may not have been as thorough about Glasgow as I should have been. I especially love the prosthetics and orthotics modules in the Starthclyde Biomedical engineering program. As a P&O student, how is the course? What do you learn in that in the essence, which aspect is more prominent in P&O? Mechanical? Electrical?

Also, don't worry about being slow in replying. You replied quite promptly as compared to when I usually get replies here. So, thank you
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Max1989
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(Original post by not_margherita)
Hello! Thank you so much for replying. I'm more into engineering than biology as well. I'm a computer science grad who really got into biomedical devices. And I love the course structure and modules at strathclyde. In fact, I really want to go there. But I felt like maybe I was too biased because I love everything about Strathclyde so much that I felt like I may not have been as thorough about Glasgow as I should have been. I especially love the prosthetics and orthotics modules in the Starthclyde Biomedical engineering program. As a P&O student, how is the course? What do you learn in that in the essence, which aspect is more prominent in P&O? Mechanical? Electrical?

Also, don't worry about being slow in replying. You replied quite promptly as compared to when I usually get replies here. So, thank you
Oh that's cool! If you love somewhere then go there, you learn more at a place you enjoy and doing a course you enjoy! I definitely would choose strathclyde then if you are interested in P&O, mainly as we have such a wide range of researchers and lecturers all specialising in P&O if you search a paper online for socket design or patient related research there will always be a strathclyde person on there. Also there is loads of opportunities to do patient based studies here, as we get volunteers for P&O which give up their time to help with people's learning, especially the us (The P&O students) but also the biomed postgrads and master's students. Very few uni's in teh UK actually have this connection with patients in P&O.

As my course is very clinical as in the end of teh day we will be treating patients for teh rest of our lives, we cover everything from reasons to get an amputation (diseases and traumas), to the procedure, the rehabilitation, then onto our bit, the verbal assessment, physical assessment casting, modification, manufacture, fitting and alignment of a prosthesis or if not prosthetics, it will be learning about different deformities and conditions that require an orthosis, manufacturing them and fitting them. We have regular practical session, this semester I had 2 9-5s where I will either be with patients or manufacturing. I have seen patients almost every week since January, and that's what I love most about my course. And what's also good with the sector is no 2 patients are alike and the department will always try and give you a different patient each time.

Then the rest of the time we are taught biomechanics, especially gait (walking) and biology, with a bit of health research as we are expected to keep up to date with all teh new technology and techniques and must provide evidence of this or risk losing our license.

But to answer your question about it being more mechanical or electrical, teh truth is there is no clear answer, because the more high end technology does use electrical thing like microprocessors and motors, but these things are expensive and the truth is most people 1) can't afford them and 2) don't need them...however if you do want to go down upper limb it is very electronic, but the technology is still very outdated. Only real people who have access to them is veterans or people who live very active lives. However mechanical wise everything is to do with mechanics, we are using inorganic materials to allow someone to stand , walk or even run, it underpins everything. However this is just currently the rate at which prosthetics has changed over the last decade has been massive, not too long ago people still walked with metal and leather prosthesis, now they walk with plastic sockets with aluminium parts, microprocessor feet that learn the gait pattern of its user, that's why I think I've jumped into the profession at the right time where the technology is getting better each day.

But yeah if you have any questions feel free to ask!
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not_margherita
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(Original post by Max1989)
Oh that's cool! If you love somewhere then go there, you learn more at a place you enjoy and doing a course you enjoy! I definitely would choose strathclyde then if you are interested in P&O, mainly as we have such a wide range of researchers and lecturers all specialising in P&O if you search a paper online for socket design or patient related research there will always be a strathclyde person on there. Also there is loads of opportunities to do patient based studies here, as we get volunteers for P&O which give up their time to help with people's learning, especially the us (The P&O students) but also the biomed postgrads and master's students. Very few uni's in teh UK actually have this connection with patients in P&O.

As my course is very clinical as in the end of teh day we will be treating patients for teh rest of our lives, we cover everything from reasons to get an amputation (diseases and traumas), to the procedure, the rehabilitation, then onto our bit, the verbal assessment, physical assessment casting, modification, manufacture, fitting and alignment of a prosthesis or if not prosthetics, it will be learning about different deformities and conditions that require an orthosis, manufacturing them and fitting them. We have regular practical session, this semester I had 2 9-5s where I will either be with patients or manufacturing. I have seen patients almost every week since January, and that's what I love most about my course. And what's also good with the sector is no 2 patients are alike and the department will always try and give you a different patient each time.

Then the rest of the time we are taught biomechanics, especially gait (walking) and biology, with a bit of health research as we are expected to keep up to date with all teh new technology and techniques and must provide evidence of this or risk losing our license.

But to answer your question about it being more mechanical or electrical, teh truth is there is no clear answer, because the more high end technology does use electrical thing like microprocessors and motors, but these things are expensive and the truth is most people 1) can't afford them and 2) don't need them...however if you do want to go down upper limb it is very electronic, but the technology is still very outdated. Only real people who have access to them is veterans or people who live very active lives. However mechanical wise everything is to do with mechanics, we are using inorganic materials to allow someone to stand , walk or even run, it underpins everything. However this is just currently the rate at which prosthetics has changed over the last decade has been massive, not too long ago people still walked with metal and leather prosthesis, now they walk with plastic sockets with aluminium parts, microprocessor feet that learn the gait pattern of its user, that's why I think I've jumped into the profession at the right time where the technology is getting better each day.

But yeah if you have any questions feel free to ask!
Thank you so much! That was so informative. One of the things I love about Strathclyde aside from the research is that we get to interact with patients which is not really that common anywhere else. I guess you're studying everything in such detail because of you're supposed to get into clinical practice. But what about the biomedical engineering department? Do you have any idea as to how broadly the subject goes? If I study P&O as a part of Biomedical engineering degree, what can I expect to learn there? Basically, can you tell me something about the biomedical department in Strath? How good it is? How's the research and funding? Is it easy to get internships in the field at the city of Glasgow?

Also, will the classes really start in September or will it begin later because of corona events? I'm sorry for question bombing you. It's just I'm so excited to go to Starthclyde and I feel good about my decision when I hear about the uni. I could dm you if you feel like that'd be better than talking here. Thanks in advance!
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Max1989
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(Original post by not_margherita)
Thank you so much! That was so informative. One of the things I love about Strathclyde aside from the research is that we get to interact with patients which is not really that common anywhere else. I guess you're studying everything in such detail because of you're supposed to get into clinical practice. But what about the biomedical engineering department? Do you have any idea as to how broadly the subject goes? If I study P&O as a part of Biomedical engineering degree, what can I expect to learn there? Basically, can you tell me something about the biomedical department in Strath? How good it is? How's the research and funding? Is it easy to get internships in the field at the city of Glasgow?

Also, will the classes really start in September or will it begin later because of corona events? I'm sorry for question bombing you. It's just I'm so excited to go to Starthclyde and I feel good about my decision when I hear about the uni. I could dm you if you feel like that'd be better than talking here. Thanks in advance!
I am the class rep for P&O so I do know a lot of the lecturers and researchers for biomedical engineering as we are under the same umbrella, apart from some of them being a bit eccentric and passionate about their research area the rare all very nice and will always do what they can to help, 2 of my lectures for P&O are Biomed Eng postgrads. Also the head of department is very nice and happy to help out. Unfortunately I do not know too much details about he course especially the masters of how broadly it goes, but if you asked they'd be happy to give you an answer, it does seem it is fairly broad though! I also believe the funding is quite good as Strath does not take on huge amounts of students and there is a lot of schemes to help, but it varies from project to project again you'd have to ask someone in a more senior position. And there is regular careers events and the Uni has very good connections with industry so they probably would be a decent amount of internships available, do not know hwo many there would be in Glasgow, for P&O we have to do placements and we get put all over the UK, it's just something you have to accept part of the job is you go where is vacant but there is always a place for you, it's probably the same for biomed as it is quite a niche field. I do believe the biomedical engineering department is one of the best in the UK so much so that it is 1 of the 4 Uni's in the doctoral training centre for P&O, which also have southampton, imperial college london and Salford (the other P&O centre in the UK) which is all about design of devices and research with patients.

And it's too early to say about that but it is 6 months away the worse will hopefully be over by then, most countries reached their peak in a month or two so we will probably do the same. So I can expect we'll be all back to normal by then or if not, open but cautious. And I don't mind whatever is easier

I am actually considering doing the Biomed Eng masters after my BSc as I do want to go into design but also patient care.
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not_margherita
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(Original post by Max1989)
I am the class rep for P&O so I do know a lot of the lecturers and researchers for biomedical engineering as we are under the same umbrella, apart from some of them being a bit eccentric and passionate about their research area the rare all very nice and will always do what they can to help, 2 of my lectures for P&O are Biomed Eng postgrads. Also the head of department is very nice and happy to help out. Unfortunately I do not know too much details about he course especially the masters of how broadly it goes, but if you asked they'd be happy to give you an answer, it does seem it is fairly broad though! I also believe the funding is quite good as Strath does not take on huge amounts of students and there is a lot of schemes to help, but it varies from project to project again you'd have to ask someone in a more senior position. And there is regular careers events and the Uni has very good connections with industry so they probably would be a decent amount of internships available, do not know hwo many there would be in Glasgow, for P&O we have to do placements and we get put all over the UK, it's just something you have to accept part of the job is you go where is vacant but there is always a place for you, it's probably the same for biomed as it is quite a niche field. I do believe the biomedical engineering department is one of the best in the UK so much so that it is 1 of the 4 Uni's in the doctoral training centre for P&O, which also have southampton, imperial college london and Salford (the other P&O centre in the UK) which is all about design of devices and research with patients.

And it's too early to say about that but it is 6 months away the worse will hopefully be over by then, most countries reached their peak in a month or two so we will probably do the same. So I can expect we'll be all back to normal by then or if not, open but cautious. And I don't mind whatever is easier

I am actually considering doing the Biomed Eng masters after my BSc as I do want to go into design but also patient care.
You've been really helpful. Thanks a lot! I've heard that it's tough for international students to get a job in the UK which is something I'm a bit anxious about but I'll have to see. As long as I get to work on something I love, location is not a problem. I just got an offer from Manchester as well. So I'm really confused where to go. But I guess where we study doesn't matter as much as how we use the time where we get to study. So there's that.

Is there any way to talk to someone in the biomedical engineering department? Also, can you tell me about the placements at the industry? I hope I'm not pestering you too much 😅
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