Is A level Spanish like GCSE English Lit

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Ali-liyyah
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Hey there guys. Hope you’re all good. Just studying for my A level mocks and wondering how to revise for Spanish in particular.

I heard somewhere that we’re going to use similar skills to GCSE English Lit, like analysing and writing essays. Do you guys think that English Lit revision methods would work for A level Spanish too? If so, does anyone have any recommendations for revision methods and how to revise.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks so much in advance x
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ag_uk
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Hey,

I'm doing A Level Spanish too (for the writing, La Casa de Bernarda Alba and El Laberinto del Fauno), and here's a few things my class and I have done that I've found pretty useful:

- we made a mindmap of key scenes, simbols, metaphors, and characters
- we condensed the play scene by scene, keeping only key quotes
- we then colour coded the remaining quotes, one colour one theme
- we also made links between the book/play and the context of the time period

Personally, I like to choose a few of the quotes for each theme (the more versatile the better) and memorise them (quizlet is good or just using them again and again in class/practice), and then plan practice essays. My teacher has made a whole list of practice ones that could come up more or less. From my understanding, we don't have to go into as much detail as GCSE English lit essays, just need to show that we understand the themes and then have a quote or two to back it up. Also, I like to just know some good phrases to do with analysis- can use them every time, and they get you good marks. Plus, since every essay will have the same format, it means if you struggle a little, you can get those phrases out onto the page and just fill out what you can remember.
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Ali-liyyah
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(Original post by ag_uk)
Hey,

I'm doing A Level Spanish too (for the writing, La Casa de Bernarda Alba and El Laberinto del Fauno), and here's a few things my class and I have done that I've found pretty useful:

- we made a mindmap of key scenes, simbols, metaphors, and characters
- we condensed the play scene by scene, keeping only key quotes
- we then colour coded the remaining quotes, one colour one theme
- we also made links between the book/play and the context of the time period

Personally, I like to choose a few of the quotes for each theme (the more versatile the better) and memorise them (quizlet is good or just using them again and again in class/practice), and then plan practice essays. My teacher has made a whole list of practice ones that could come up more or less. From my understanding, we don't have to go into as much detail as GCSE English lit essays, just need to show that we understand the themes and then have a quote or two to back it up. Also, I like to just know some good phrases to do with analysis- can use them every time, and they get you good marks. Plus, since every essay will have the same format, it means if you struggle a little, you can get those phrases out onto the page and just fill out what you can remember.
Hey. Thanks so much for your help. What revision methods (e.g: mind maps, simple revision notes, revision cards or flashcards) do you find most helpful for speaking, listening and reading revision?

We have a listening and reading test on El Ciberespacio on Thursday and I’m struggling with revision. I’ve made key words flashcards already but I don’t feel like that’s enough and I’m unsure about what else I can do to revise.

Again, any help would be appreciated. Thanks so much in advance x
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ag_uk
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good luck with your exam!

personally I'm not a fan of mind maps or paper flashcards, they stress me out too much. I am a sucker for quizlet, however. I like the different features they have for learning a set of cards and it's easy to see your progress. Something I also do is when going through papers or practice tasks in class, I'll highlight every word I don't know and underline phrases I don't know how to translate. Then I type them up onto quizlet and learn them (though to be honest, procrastination is hitting hard and I've yet to do this stage). Learning the vocab might not seem like enough, but the more words you know the better.

For speaking, I just try and speak Spanish in my head as much as I can. Usually it is just basics, or random words every now and then (e.g. necesitamos leche) but I find it just kind of helps you get into the mindset? I also have a good friend who I only ever message in Spanish, we do voice notes as well. For me, the difficult thing with speaking is that we try and say it exactly as we would in English, but obviously that is impossible as we are nowhere near the same level of Spanish as we are with our native language, so when I speak I basically try and dumb down what I am saying, while still getting the message across. Listening also helps with spanish songs/shows and using subtitles (spanish or English), as it just helps move my brain into Spanish? As in it makes my head hurt less when I have to listen or read Spanish in long chunks. There's also this website, you should give it a go. https://lyricstraining.com/es/

I've often found that with reading, in the exam you find the latter texts soo hard, but when you go over it in class, it isn't that bad. For me, I think it's because after a while, all the Spanish really overwhelms me, so I try and fix this by doing as many practice papers/spanish texts as I can.

My brain is fried from having done a 5,000 word spanish essay, so I can't be bothered to read through this again- hope it all makes sense and at least helps a bit.

Lastly, remember that some revision is still better than none. You'll never have learnt the whole language before the exam, and neither will have anyone else, so don't stress out too bad!
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Ali-liyyah
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(Original post by ag_uk)
good luck with your exam!

personally I'm not a fan of mind maps or paper flashcards, they stress me out too much. I am a sucker for quizlet, however. I like the different features they have for learning a set of cards and it's easy to see your progress. Something I also do is when going through papers or practice tasks in class, I'll highlight every word I don't know and underline phrases I don't know how to translate. Then I type them up onto quizlet and learn them (though to be honest, procrastination is hitting hard and I've yet to do this stage). Learning the vocab might not seem like enough, but the more words you know the better.

For speaking, I just try and speak Spanish in my head as much as I can. Usually it is just basics, or random words every now and then (e.g. necesitamos leche) but I find it just kind of helps you get into the mindset? I also have a good friend who I only ever message in Spanish, we do voice notes as well. For me, the difficult thing with speaking is that we try and say it exactly as we would in English, but obviously that is impossible as we are nowhere near the same level of Spanish as we are with our native language, so when I speak I basically try and dumb down what I am saying, while still getting the message across. Listening also helps with spanish songs/shows and using subtitles (spanish or English), as it just helps move my brain into Spanish? As in it makes my head hurt less when I have to listen or read Spanish in long chunks. There's also this website, you should give it a go. https://lyricstraining.com/es/

I've often found that with reading, in the exam you find the latter texts soo hard, but when you go over it in class, it isn't that bad. For me, I think it's because after a while, all the Spanish really overwhelms me, so I try and fix this by doing as many practice papers/spanish texts as I can.

My brain is fried from having done a 5,000 word spanish essay, so I can't be bothered to read through this again- hope it all makes sense and at least helps a bit.

Lastly, remember that some revision is still better than none. You'll never have learnt the whole language before the exam, and neither will have anyone else, so don't stress out too bad!
Thank you so much. This was really helpful. Thank you x
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