Diiverr
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Our teacher has assigned us to do a powerpoint on an investigation, I chose to do one on an investigation on the sensitivity of human thermoreceptors in the skin, however I do not understand some aspects of the only method I could find:

https://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/p...ture-receptors

I have a few questions about this, I know that thermoreceptors in human skin are relative, as in they will get used to environment (hot and cold water), which is why the room temperature water will feel cold to one hand and warm to the other. However what I don't understand is the bit about placing thermometers on various places on the hand AFTER the hands feel like normal again, won't they just give back room temperature? And how does this measure the range of sensitivity of human thermoreceptors?

Thank you for any replies and have a nice Christmas
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errrr99
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(Original post by Diiverr)
However what I don't understand is the bit about placing thermometers on various places on the hand AFTER the hands feel like normal again, won't they just give back room temperature? And how does this measure the range of sensitivity of human thermoreceptors?

Thank you for any replies and have a nice Christmas
quoted from your link with annotations:
"The highest reading on the cold thermometer and the lowest reading on the warm thermometer mark the ends of the ‘thermoneutral’ range of the skin sensitivity." the thermometer that was in the 2 degree water will genuinely feel cold to the skin; but it will probably warm up with repeated contact on the hand, and when it eventually reaches room temperature I don't think the hand would sense whether it is hot or cold

"In this range we detect only touch, and are not aware of temperature. This is likely to be around 20 °C for most of us." this sounds plausible although I have not done the experiment

"Think about the consequences of this in terms of our preferred temperature for our surroundings – where we won’t feel hot or cold. This might affect how we like to set our thermostats at home." have you tried changing the thermostat at home? if you put it below 16 deg someone will probably complain, and if you put it over 22 deg surely someone will complain (mostly about their heating bill)
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