hehe_x
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So I'm thinking of applying for medicine in 2021, but the only thing I'm doubtful about is the duration of a medicine course. I know in university it's around 5/6 years to complete medicine, but after that how many years are you still in education so in total how long does it take to become a doctor?
Also, if anyone is doing medicine how is your experience so far? I really don't know if I'm taking the right decision here. I have the grades + determination but I don't want it to turn out to be something completely different to my expectations coz then I know I won't be motivated to work hard.
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THALCEDONY
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(Original post by hehe_x)
So I'm thinking of applying for medicine in 2021, but the only thing I'm doubtful about is the duration of a medicine course. I know in university it's around 5/6 years to complete medicine, but after that how many years are you still in education so in total how long does it take to become a doctor?
Also, if anyone is doing medicine how is your experience so far? I really don't know if I'm taking the right decision here. I have the grades + determination but I don't want it to turn out to be something completely different to my expectations coz then I know I won't be motivated to work hard.
It's 5 years to get a medical degree, 6 if you intercalate (basically get a second degree on top of a medical degree). That is then followed by 2 years of foundation training. You then begin training for your speciality (GP is the shortest with 3 years) and that's it. So the shortest amount of time you can become a fully qualified doctor is in 5+2+3=10 years.
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username2998742
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(Original post by THALCEDONY)
It's 5 years to get a medical degree, 6 if you intercalate (basically get a second degree on top of a medical degree). That is then followed by 2 years of foundation training. You then begin training for your speciality (GP is the shortest with 3 years) and that's it. So the shortest amount of time you can become a fully qualified doctor is in 5+2+3=10 years.
ecolier Correct me if I'm wrong but don't you become a fully qualified doctor after you've got your MBChB/MBBS/Whatever?
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SaDe7
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(Original post by THALCEDONY)
It's 5 years to get a medical degree, 6 if you intercalate (basically get a second degree on top of a medical degree). That is then followed by 2 years of foundation training. You then begin training for your speciality (GP is the shortest with 3 years) and that's it. So the shortest amount of time you can become a fully qualified doctor is in 5+2+3=10 years.
surgeons/consultants take a bit longer though. I'm not too sure about other specialities but it takes around 7 years after the foundation programme to become a fully qualified ophthalmologist (eye surgeon). However, most doctors don't just go through the shortest possible route and instead take time off in between to travel, volunteer, do a PhD etc.
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realtimme
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you qualify as a doctor after your 4/5/6 year mbbs/mbchb/bmbs, so after your degree you are a fully qualified 'doctor' albeit a junior one. it can then take around 5-10 years of extra training after that to become a consultant in your chosen specialty. hope that helps!
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ecolier
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(Original post by hehe_x)
So I'm thinking of applying for medicine in 2021, but the only thing I'm doubtful about is the duration of a medicine course. I know in university it's around 5/6 years to complete medicine, but after that how many years are you still in education so in total how long does it take to become a doctor?
Also, if anyone is doing medicine how is your experience so far? I really don't know if I'm taking the right decision here. I have the grades + determination but I don't want it to turn out to be something completely different to my expectations coz then I know I won't be motivated to work hard.
All this information is easily available if you search.

TSR Medicine WIki: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Medicine

TSRMedics thread on the basic overview of specialties: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6026828

(Original post by THALCEDONY)
... you can become a fully qualified doctor is in 5+2+3=10 years.
I wouldn't use the term fully qualified to represent only "proper GPs" and consultants. All FY2s are fully registered with the GMC and technically can practise independently. If you google "fully qualified doctors" you'd get SHOs and registrars too.

(Original post by Glaz)
ecolier Correct me if I'm wrong but don't you become a fully qualified doctor after you've got your MBChB/MBBS/Whatever?
You become provisionally registered with the GMC when you graduate with your MBBS / MBChB, and fully registered when you completed FY1.

You get a CCT (Certificate of Completion of Training) to signify that you have finished training when you become a "proper GP" or a consultant.

(Original post by SaDe7)
surgeons/consultants take a bit longer though. I'm not too sure about other specialities but it takes around 7 years after the foundation programme to become a fully qualified ophthalmologist (eye surgeon). However, most doctors don't go just go through the shortest possible route and instead take time off in between to travel, volunteer, do a PhD etc.
:yes: In my thread I have listed usually how long it takes.

GP is 3 years after FY2, psychiatry is 6 years after FY2, a lot of med and surgical specialties take between 7-8 years after FY2.

And you are right that many doctors go on a gap year(s) after FY2, a few will go between CT2 and ST3 too. Some will take time out during registrar training to do some post-grad courses.

(Original post by realtimme)
you qualify as a doctor after your 4/5/6 year mbbs/mbchb/bmbs, so after your degree you are a fully qualified 'doctor' albeit a junior one. it can then take around 5-10 years of extra training after that to become a consultant in your chosen specialty. hope that helps!
:yes:
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nexttime
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To become a consultant? Much longer than anywhere else, and getting longer!

Its sufficiently long that things like maternity leave get in the way too - the average is way more than the 'headline' figures, which you can google.
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Helenia
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It's likely to take me 21 years from leaving school to becoming a consultant in my chosen specialty!

Gap year
6 year degree
FY1/2
"FY3" (though nobody was calling it that at the time)
CT1/2
ST3/4
Maternity leave for 10 months
ST5 at 60% LTFT = 20 months total
Bit of ST6
Maternity leave no.2 for 10 months (end date tbc)
Rest of ST6/7 = 3ish years when I return.

And that's with no research time or subspecialty fellowships!
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