Segued
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#1
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Hi, I am currently studying for my MA History (DL) and I am struggling to get my head around the self-plagiarism rules. Last year I wrote an essay for a different module in relation to civilian morale during the air raids in the Second World War. It was focused around government policy to civilians. This year, for a different module, I am writing an essay about the morality and legality of Britain's strategic bombing of Germany in the Second World War. Both essays are different, covering very different aspects of literature and both have very different arguments. My worry is that there is a couple of points / quotes from literature that I would like to use in my new essay. I asked my tutor who advised to stay clear, or to re-word and reference a different author. Has anyone got any experience of this? How much rewording is required? Its quite hard to re-word factual information for example sequence of events, dates, descriptions of key events.
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999tigger
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#2
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(Original post by Segued)
Hi, I am currently studying for my MA History (DL) and I am struggling to get my head around the self-plagiarism rules. Last year I wrote an essay for a different module in relation to civilian morale during the air raids in the Second World War. It was focused around government policy to civilians. This year, for a different module, I am writing an essay about the morality and legality of Britain's strategic bombing of Germany in the Second World War. Both essays are different, covering very different aspects of literature and both have very different arguments. My worry is that there is a couple of points / quotes from literature that I would like to use in my new essay. I asked my tutor who advised to stay clear, or to re-word and reference a different author. Has anyone got any experience of this? How much rewording is required? Its quite hard to re-word factual information for example sequence of events, dates, descriptions of key events.
You should read your unis rules on self plagiarism. It is your responsibility.
I believe you can submit the information if you credit your essay in the source or you can find an alternative reference as a source. You have already alerted your tutor about it, so they will be on the lookout.
If the source is from a book and not your own then just reference the source.
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Liverpool Hope University
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#3
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(Original post by Segued)
Hi, I am currently studying for my MA History (DL) and I am struggling to get my head around the self-plagiarism rules. Last year I wrote an essay for a different module in relation to civilian morale during the air raids in the Second World War. It was focused around government policy to civilians. This year, for a different module, I am writing an essay about the morality and legality of Britain's strategic bombing of Germany in the Second World War. Both essays are different, covering very different aspects of literature and both have very different arguments. My worry is that there is a couple of points / quotes from literature that I would like to use in my new essay. I asked my tutor who advised to stay clear, or to re-word and reference a different author. Has anyone got any experience of this? How much rewording is required? Its quite hard to re-word factual information for example sequence of events, dates, descriptions of key events.
Hi there Segued

As 999tigger says, you should definitely read your universities rules on self plagiarism and also listen to your tutors advice.

If you have points you want to take from your previous work, then you can use the sources, but will need to reword it from your previous work, otherwise TurnItIn will flag it. Alternatively look for different sources to make the same point you can use instead. As you say, factual dates/data will always be the same, and similarity on that point is unavoidable, but its your wording you need to ensure is different to what you have previously submitted.

Fi :horse:
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学生の父
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(Original post by Segued)
Hi, I am currently studying for my MA History (DL) and I am struggling to get my head around the self-plagiarism rules. Last year I wrote an essay for a different module in relation to civilian morale during the air raids in the Second World War. It was focused around government policy to civilians. This year, for a different module, I am writing an essay about the morality and legality of Britain's strategic bombing of Germany in the Second World War. Both essays are different, covering very different aspects of literature and both have very different arguments. My worry is that there is a couple of points / quotes from literature that I would like to use in my new essay. I asked my tutor who advised to stay clear, or to re-word and reference a different author. Has anyone got any experience of this? How much rewording is required? Its quite hard to re-word factual information for example sequence of events, dates, descriptions of key events.
The facts will remain the same, but the way you present those facts in your historical interpretation needs to differ. This would seem clear as your first essay was about morale during air raids, and your second is about the morality and legality of Britain's bombing.

You should reference your earlier essay, too, if there is any common ground.

In some MA work I did, I was told by my tutor that I couldn't present an article I had previously published as an essay for the course. If it had been the other way around --- MA course essay then published as an article --- it would have been fine.
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