AQA GCSE English Literature question

Watch this thread
jameschadwick331
Badges: 9
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 2 years ago
#1
How does Priestley present class in an Inspector Calls?

How many marks do people think I would receive for this as an answer?
Please leave improvements below.

Priestley uses the characters in an inspector calls to emphasise the large difference in the social classes during the Edwardian Era. The capitalistic individualism was overtaking the working class during the 20th century, forcing those who are in the socialistic collectivism division to suffer due to the greed of the middle- and upper-class societies. Priestley uses the juxtaposing classes of Eva Smith, a factory worker that is referred to “girls of that class” to show how the upper-class families corrupted the working class and forced them to suffer during these times.

Mrs Birling, the wife of Mr birling is the most upper class of the characters presented in an Inspector calls, who Mr Birling married only to progress upwards in the social ladder, increasing the amount of wealth he is getting. Mrs Birling refers to the lower-class female factory workers such as Eva Smith as ‘girls of that class’ which emphasises that she seems to think that the working-class people are not humans at all and are only pawns to help business progress in its growth to economic stability. Furthermore, in the beginning, Priestley describes the Birlings’ house as a ‘fairly large suburban house’ with ‘good solid furniture of the period’ which shows that the Birling family are middle class and that they are wealthy. They also have a Palourmaid, Edna, which further emphasis Mrs Birlings use of the lower class as pawns as they are only used to do things that the higher-class people shouldn’t need to do. This juxtaposes Priestley’s socialistic views, which enforces the message that although he is discussing the ideas about capitalistic individualism, he agrees with it completely and knows that the way people were in these times were a corrupt way, damaging the future generations of the working-class families.

Mr Birling, while in conversation with the inspector says “Perhaps I ought to warn you that he’s an old friend of mine, and that I see him fairly frequently” This emphasises the derogative attitudes of Mr birling, as although being interrogated he continues to insult the inspector due to his status and authority in society, showing Mr birling’s attempts to be dominant towards the socialistic views presented by the inspector. This represents the lack of respect upper-class families have for those who are forced to work in less wealthy conditions. Furthermore, Mr Birling sees Eva as just one of “several hundred young women” who worked at his factory. This shows that in his view, all his workers have no value. By saying “they keep changing” he shows the audience he did not even care if he dismissed Eva as she was just cheap labour to him. Therefore, by the victim of the play being a working-class female, Priestley highlights the vulnerability of the working class in those times, something that was socially acceptable. This idea also links to the play's theme of women, as women of the times were in stasis due to them not having any rights.

Soon after his entrance, the audience starts to realise that the Inspector's investigation focuses on the surprising links between different events and people. The Inspector initiates this idea of connections through anadiplosis; by repeating 'what happened to her afterwards' ad the end of one clause and beginning of the next, the sentence structure itself cleverly emphasises how the content of these statements is inextricably connected and leads on from one another. Next, he memorably summarises this concept with the metaphorical image of 'A chain of events'. The concrete noun 'chain' refers to an object that embodies physical linking. Even more, so that it connotes heaviness and imprisonment, perhaps inferring that the links between various 'events' involving the Birlings and Eva smith could be what weighs down the entire family.

Mrs Birling’s snobbery attitude develops to a point later in the play when she calls Eva a “girl of that sort.” She represents the ignorant older capitalist generation that Priestley implies was responsible for the inequality of the society at that time and which led to the younger generation suffering in “fire and blood and anguish. This presents Mrs Birling’s juxtaposing ideas of the younger generation who although are still in a capitalistic family, their views differ from the typical capitalistic, as they are more sided towards the socialistic collectivism that Priestley believes in. This shows the selfishness of Mrs Birling, as she wishes everyone to be equal to her, and anyone that chooses to defy her ways are an enemy to her. This is what Priestley does, and she is worried about the power she enforces which emphasises that although she is a believer in capitalistic individualism, Priestley views of Socialistic collectivism overpower her beliefs.
0
reply
absolutelysprout
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 2 years ago
#2
(Original post by jameschadwick331)
How does Priestley present class in an Inspector Calls?

How many marks do people think I would receive for this as an answer?
Please leave improvements below.

Priestley uses the characters in 'An Inspector Calls' to emphasise the large difference in the social classes during the Edwardian Era. The capitalistic individualism was overtaking the working class during the 20th century, forcing those who are in the socialistic collectivism division you can just use lower class to suffer due to the greed of the middle- and upper-class societies. Priestley uses the juxtaposing classes of Eva Smith, a factory worker that is referred to as “girls of that class” to show how the upper-class families corrupted the working class and forced them to suffer during these times. i wouldn't really say 'girls of that class' shows the corruption of the upper class- a dismissive attitude of the working class, certainly. maybe you're better off picking a different phrase here in the intro as you explore this quote a bit later on in the essay.

Mrs Birling, the wife of Mr Birling is the most upper class of the characters presented in An Inspector Calls, who Mr Birling married only to progress upwards in the social ladder, increasing the amount of wealth he is getting. Mrs Birling refers to the lower-class female factory workers such as Eva Smith as ‘girls of that class’ which emphasises that she seems to think that the working-class people are not humans at all and are only pawns to help business progress in its growth to economic stability. Furthermore, in the beginning, Priestley describes the Birlings’ house as a ‘fairly large suburban house’ with ‘good solid furniture of the period’ which shows that the Birling family are middle class and that they are wealthy go a bit deeper in your analysis here, these are fairly obvious points. talk about how they have a large suburban house and all this showy furniture likely to conceal the distant dynamic between the family.. They also have a parlour maid, Edna, which further emphasis Mrs Birling's use of the lower class as pawns as they are only used to do things that the higher-class people shouldn’t need to do. perhaps explore the treatment of edna or just leave this out completely. This juxtaposes Priestley’s socialistic views, which enforces the message that although he is discussing the ideas about capitalistic individualism, he (who? priestley or mr birling?) agrees with it completely and knows that the way people were in these times were a corrupt way, damaging the future generations of the working-class families.

Mr Birling, while in conversation with the Inspector says “Perhaps I ought to warn you that he’s an old friend of mine, and that I see him fairly frequently”. This emphasises the derogative attitudes of Mr Birling, as although being interrogated he continues to insult the inspector due to his status and authority in society, showing Mr Birling’s attempts to be dominant towards the socialistic views presented by the Inspector. This represents the lack of respect upper-class families have for those who are forced to work in less wealthy conditions. Furthermore, Mr Birling sees Eva as just one of “several hundred young women” who worked at his factory. This shows that in his view, all his workers have no value. By saying “they keep changing” he shows the audience he did not even care if he dismissed Eva as she was just cheap labour to him. Therefore, by the victim of the play being a working-class female, Priestley highlights the vulnerability of the working class in those times, something that was socially acceptable. This idea also links to the play's theme of women, as women of the times were in stasis due to them not having any rights. discuss how the workers can keep changing and be easily replaced but the women's rights aren't changing emphasising hopelessness of situation etc.

Soon after his entrance, the audience starts to realise that the Inspector's investigation focuses on the surprising links between different events and people. The Inspector initiates this idea of connections through anadiplosis do be careful when you're using these fancy words and ensure they don't compensate for weak or shallow analysis.; by repeating 'what happened to her afterwards' at the end of one clause and beginning of the next, the sentence structure itself cleverly emphasises how the content of these statements is inextricably connected and leads on from one another. you could talk about community here and the lack of it within the birling family. Next He memorably summarises this concept with the metaphorical image of 'A chain of events'. The concrete noun 'chain' refers to an object that embodies physical linking. Even more, so that it connotes heaviness and imprisonment, perhaps inferring that the links between various 'events' involving the Birlings and Eva smith could be what weighs down the entire family. nice bit of analysis. perhaps link the end of the para back to class??

Mrs Birling’s snobby attitude develops to a point later in the play when she calls Eva a “girl of that sort.” She represents the ignorant older capitalist generation that Priestley implies was responsible for the inequality of the society at that time and which led to the younger generation suffering in “fire and blood and anguish". This presents Mrs Birling’s juxtaposing ideas of the younger generation who although are still in a capitalistic family, their views differ from the typical capitalistic, as they are more sided towards the socialistic collectivism that Priestley believes in. this sentence is a little awkwardly worded. This shows the selfishness of Mrs Birling, as she wishes everyone to be equal to her (does she? evidence of this?) , and anyone that chooses to defy her ways are an enemy to her. She is worried about the power she enforces which emphasises that although she is a believer in capitalistic individualism, Priestley's views of Socialistic collectivism overpower her beliefs.
you do use a lot of 'this presents' and 'this shows' so the structure gets a bit repetitive, try being more sophisticated in your language. analysis is shallow in some places, but semi-decent essay overall. not sure what mark i'd give it as i'm not a teacher.
0
reply
ABCBAA
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 2 years ago
#3
I've had a quick scan, and it's very good.

Good use of technical terminology (AO2) (e.g. concrete noun), and good use of quotation.
I would say that in the first paragraph when you talk about the "socialistic collectivism division" it doesn't sound right. Rather than division, you might want to say, "those who embraced socialistic collectivism", or something along those lines. I think in some places you use excellent words but are a little unsure about how to use them (e.g. you talk of Mrs Birling's "snobbery attitude" - you don't need the word attitude here, as snobbery is a noun in its own right). Make sure you show the examiner you know how to use the vocabulary - that way you'll give a really good impression from the outset.
You don't need to state that Mrs Birling is the wife of Mr Birling - it's not needed as the people who mark your work will have read the text. You'd save time not saying it.
You've got some really good points here, but the essay seems a lot longer than what you'd be able to write in the real exam, taking planning and checking into consideration. I would always recommend writing essays that you could feasibly write within the time limit. Otherwise, you might get yourself carried away in the exam. I think the essay merits a conclusion as well - just a sentence or two to round off your essay.

Overall, it's a good essay, but a few improvements here and there would really make it shine. I'm not a teacher, so I don't think it would be right for me to give this a mark. Ask your teacher to take a look at it - I'm sure he/she will be happy to give it a mark.

I hope you found this useful.

While you're here, I'd really appreciate it if you can fill out a survey on cryptocurrencies I'm using for a research project - it'll only take two minutes! Here's the link: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/6ZQD95H

Please spread the message!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Were exams easier or harder than you expected?

Easier (21)
27.63%
As I expected (23)
30.26%
Harder (28)
36.84%
Something else (tell us in the thread) (4)
5.26%

Watched Threads

View All