Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lithium)
    Thanks, ill look into that...but i doubt its credibiulity...i mean, there is no "easy" way to quit...nicotine is said to be a 200 times more potent drug than heroin...figure that...
    its about the psychological need, it tries to eradicate it

    its like heroin because people feel addicted after they try it once but it takes allot more, so the idea is that your mind is addicted not your body hence the psychological angle
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by roots)
    its about the psychological need, it tries to eradicate it

    its like heroin because people feel addicted after they try it once but it takes allot more, so the idea is that your mind is addicted not your body hence the psychological angle
    but there is one hell of a physical component to nicotine addiction...and infact you need alot less...a few mgs, while i really dunno what the avg. "sniff" or "fix" of heroin would be, but from what i've seen (TV :P) its more than a few milligrams
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lithium)
    Cold turkey??????????? :eek::eek::eek::eek:

    Your mom is a super-human....i know a few people who have quit, but not cold turkey! wow..good for her!
    Nope shes not that amazing! She did use patches, but after 12 hours or so of giving up.
    I didnt even notice she wasnt smoking for 3 days despite her 50 a day habit.
    How unobservant am I!!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I just got scared by the health warnings and adverts that was enough for me
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mollymustard)
    Nope shes not that amazing! She did use patches, but after 12 hours or so of giving up.
    I didnt even notice she wasnt smoking for 3 days despite her 50 a day habit.
    How unobservant am I!!
    She must have had her temper under control :p:

    When my mom and / or dad try to quit, you can tell...even before they start...like when they are THINKING about it...grrrrrrrr....unhappy memories

    But seriously. inspriring...rep
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lithium)
    She must have had her temper under control :p:

    When my mom and / or dad try to quit, you can tell...even before they start...like when they are THINKING about it...grrrrrrrr....unhappy memories

    But seriously. inspriring...rep
    Oh, and thanks everyone so very much for your help

    really hope i quite
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lithium)
    but there is one hell of a physical component to nicotine addiction...and infact you need alot less...a few mgs, while i really dunno what the avg. "sniff" or "fix" of heroin would be, but from what i've seen (TV :P) its more than a few milligrams
    how many quitters stay nicotine free on alan carrs method? would be interesting to know

    there is a physical aspect but its temporary if you decide to quit, as long as you regulate mind and body you should be able to quit
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Smoked weed and cigs and gave them both up cold turkey. Once you get past that first week you are fine.

    I got them candy stick sweets from the shop and used them to stop the craving of holding something, I also had toothpicks.

    Whatever works really.

    The weed was tougher to get off. Whoever says that stuff isn't addictive is mad.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Polska)
    I just got scared by the health warnings and adverts that was enough for me
    the infertility one gives me a really uneasy feeling, the shakes
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by roots)
    how many quitters stay nicotine free on alan carrs method? would be interesting to know

    there is a physical aspect but its temporary if you decide to quit, as long as you regulate mind and body you should be able to quit
    true. i would not argue that withdrawal from heroin is better...lol...not at all...

    doing it might be more fun...quitting it, uh uhh!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by roots)
    the infertility one gives me a really uneasy feeling, the shakes
    it is amazing though how EVERYTHING that can go wrong with a persons health can be related to smoking...or better put, smoking is a risk factor for nearly every aquired illness....scarry **** right there....

    they say, for a smoker, not matter what his health condition, the single best thing a smoker can do to improve their quality of life and longevity is to give up their smoking habit.....:eek::eek::eek::no:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lithium)
    it is amazing though how EVERYTHING that can go wrong with a persons health can be related to smoking...or better put, smoking is a risk factor for nearly every aquired illness....scarry **** right there....

    they say, for a smoker, not matter what his health condition, the single best thing a smoker can do to improve their quality of life and longevity is to give up their smoking habit.....:eek::eek::eek::no:
    true, i cant imagine what id go through on a hospital bed if im told its a result of smoking, i dont want to realise that im the ultimate fool and put loved ones through a hard time because of ignorant stupidity

    isnt almost everything likely to give you something nowadays?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by roots)
    true, i cant imagine what id go through on a hospital bed if im told its a result of smoking, i dont want to realise that im the ultimate fool and put loved ones through a hard time because of ignorant stupidity

    isnt almost everything likely to give you something nowadays?
    even "health-freaks" are at higher risks for some seriouse illnesses! Go figure! :yep:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lithium)
    even "health-freaks" are at higher risks for some seriouse illnesses! Go figure! :yep:
    have you heard that smokers are less likely to get alzheimers and other diseases

    maybe people will end up just eating fruit and veg after the studies have showed how everything will harm you, its funny though because like smoking everything has benefits too

    just living a healthy lifestyle, right foods and exercise, not overdoing it, avoiding stress and a bit of luck is all you need
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Grandfather quit after 60 years (I think thats addicted enough)
    anyway, he turned to humbugs if that's of any help :|
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    The Alan Carr book is really good. A teacher at my school gave me his Little Book of Quitting and it worked for about three days. I really want to get the full book.

    Edit: A lot of the people I've spoke to about the book say it is really good.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by roots)
    have you heard that smokers are less likely to get alzheimers and other diseases

    maybe people will end up just eating fruit and veg after the studies have showed how everything will harm you, its funny though because like smoking everything has benefits too

    just living a healthy lifestyle, right foods and exercise, not overdoing it, avoiding stress and a bit of luck is all you need
    in my med. genetics courses, we were told they it is genetic mutaions that occur in the lung that cause the lung cancer....however, in a very small part of the population, their DNA mutates in a way that give "protective" properties...i.e. a very tiny minority of smokers are LESS likely to get lung cancer than a non smoking population
    LMFAO

    we're screwed no matter what

    and if that dont get us, WW III will :woo:
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I smoked for almost 20 years (bad I know), but I have now given up.

    IMHO, the first thing you need to do is to set a date in the future, a date you will remember but not a BIG day (i.e. not your birthday, New Years Day, Christmas, etc - for the main reason that you will be likely to drink and/or be around other smokers on those days). Picking the ideal date is subjective and is largely down to trying to forecast a day that you *think* will work for you.

    An ideal day would be a time when you are not around other smokers but also when you won't be sat around twiddling your thumbs. Obviously I can't tell you when that is as it's something only you will be able to guesstimate depending on your lifestyle/situation. Personally I planned for January 2nd as I wasn't going to be working for a few days (and so wouldn't be around other social smokers during the worst part), I would try not to get plastered on New Years Day (but still be able to enjoy New Years Eve) and I would hopefully be around family who didn't smoke (but not friends who did). For reasons that will become clear I'd recommend you to pick a date around 3-6 months from now.

    When you've picked your date you can start to prepare. The first thing you need to do is tell everyone you know, and I mean EVERYONE, that you are giving up smoking on that date. At first people will be like "yeah, whatever", but if you keep gently dropping it into conversations ("only 3 weeks till I give up", etc), you'll hopefully manage to persuade them that you're serious. The reason you are doing this is to create a network of people who expect you to give up (and hopefully even some who expect you to fail) - when you're sat around twiddling your thumbs, debating whether to give into temptation or not, the thought of "public failure" can pull you through. Crucially, you need to challenge anyone who talks negatively about your task (giving up), if they say they've tried to give up X times and it's impossible; tell them you'll succeed. Be determined to prove them wrong, this is peer pressure in reverse.

    Secondly; just before your date, go to your GP and get on some sort of 'script. Personally I'd recommend patches because gum and the nicotine tubes create alternatives to the "putting cig to your mouth" habit, imho it's better to break the habit along with the addiction otherwise you'll just be fighting the habit when the nicotine withdrawal has subsided. Most GP surgeries (and some chemists) offer free patch programs, so don't buy them. Not only will you be saving money by joining a program but you'll also be adding more people into to the "peer pressure" pot.

    When the date comes you need to be strict. On the night before have your final cig (enjoy it - make it a momentous occasion) and then take any remaining cigs outside and dispose of them so they are unrecoverable (don't just dump the packet in the bin where you can pick them up again in the morning - snap them up and throw them down the bog or throw the packet into a street drain, etc).

    First day, wake up and put a patch on instantly. This is where the patches come in handy, they don't stop you craving but at least you know you have "something" (placebo?). Still, it's better than nothing. After breakfast is a good time to do something to take your mind off smoking, do something unusual, not something familiar with smoking (and definitely not drinking - I'd avoid drink completely for, at the very least, a few days). Again it's subjective but maybe you could read, go the cinema, go jogging, walk in the park, etc? Just don't do an activity that you associate with smoking (ie; if your used to sitting playing on an Xbox 360 with a fag in your hand don't do it!). If you're anything like me you'll probably need a distraction after each meal, plan some. Anything that involves physical strain is good because getting to sleep for the first couple of days can be a *****.

    Another important bit; keep accounting (financially) for your cigs after you stop. On your first day go and buy yourself something with the money you've saved, something you enjoy but not something that makes you want to smoke (not a pint of beer!). Maybe chocolate, crisps, etc. Now keep the money aside for 3 days worth of smoking and buy yourself something with 3 days worth of money. Now do the same again for 7 days. And again for 14 days. Again for 30 days. Buy things each time that you want, treat yourself, don't just pay your mobile bill with the money; buy something you've always wanted. It's positive reinforcement.

    One final thing I would add is that you should be prepared for cravings for months (long after you've withdrawn from nicotine), especially when you're doing something that you associated with smoking. It doesn't seem like it at the time but you do get over it! Good luck!
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 15, 2008
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.