Viper2102
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hi there,
I am currently doing A-Levels studying Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Further Maths, and an EPQ in flight simulation aircraft design. I do air cadets and I have been promoted to Sergeant. I am a solo glider pilot, and have over 100 hours.
I have always wanted to be an RAF Pilot, hopefully getting picked for Fast Jets, and I'm at the stage where I am starting to think about what I need to do to start some kind of application preparation. I have plenty of time to get myself up to standard, and I'm thinking about doing a CBAT, so I still have an option to do it again next year when I leave school.
My question is what do I need to do to try and get up to the standards that the RAF are going to be expecting. Things like researching the RAF, learning all current operations, learning how to be a competent leader etc....
Any recommendations for what I should do for my next steps to become an RAF Pilot would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!
0
reply
threeportdrift
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by Viper2102)
Hi there,
I am currently doing A-Levels studying Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Further Maths, and an EPQ in flight simulation aircraft design. I do air cadets and I have been promoted to Sergeant. I am a solo glider pilot, and have over 100 hours.
I have always wanted to be an RAF Pilot, hopefully getting picked for Fast Jets, and I'm at the stage where I am starting to think about what I need to do to start some kind of application preparation. I have plenty of time to get myself up to standard, and I'm thinking about doing a CBAT, so I still have an option to do it again next year when I leave school.
My question is what do I need to do to try and get up to the standards that the RAF are going to be expecting. Things like researching the RAF, learning all current operations, learning how to be a competent leader etc....
Any recommendations for what I should do for my next steps to become an RAF Pilot would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!
Go to University, do the degree best suited to your back-up career if you fail the medical/get chopped. Join the University Air Squadron while at Uni. Apply to join the RAF in your final year at Uni.
1
reply
Surnia
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
Plenty of threads on here about applying to be an officer in the RAF. Using your initiative is a big part, so do some research on how you can show leadership potential.

And yes, follow the advice on education for an alternative career.
1
reply
RAF_Adam
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by Viper2102)
Hi there,
I am currently doing A-Levels studying Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Further Maths, and an EPQ in flight simulation aircraft design. I do air cadets and I have been promoted to Sergeant. I am a solo glider pilot, and have over 100 hours.
I have always wanted to be an RAF Pilot, hopefully getting picked for Fast Jets, and I'm at the stage where I am starting to think about what I need to do to start some kind of application preparation. I have plenty of time to get myself up to standard, and I'm thinking about doing a CBAT, so I still have an option to do it again next year when I leave school.
My question is what do I need to do to try and get up to the standards that the RAF are going to be expecting. Things like researching the RAF, learning all current operations, learning how to be a competent leader etc....
Any recommendations for what I should do for my next steps to become an RAF Pilot would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks!
Hi

The decision whether you do a degree or not is entirely up to you, no one can make that decision for you. However, there are many stages of the application process that mean you could be unsuccessful, so having an alternative plan is a good idea. But you only need GCSEs and A levels to be able to submit an application.

You don't require any former flight experience, the RAF trains all of its pilots from scratch. And you'll apply to be a pilot, the RAF will decide which type of aircraft you'll fly.

The CBAT is part of the application process for the role, the first one post the submission of your application, so you'll know if you're able to carry on your application and your options within the RAF at that point.

Knowing about the role you're applying for, how it fits into the RAF and the role of the RAF is paramount. Leadership and teamwork experience are key, which you can get while at uni, for example, but can be gained elsewhere while doing A levels too.

The next steps for you, if you have your predicted grades and you feel ready fitness-wise etc, is to submit an application via the role page on the RAF Recruitment website. Only you know when you're ready to do that.

Kind regards
Adam
RAF Recruitment
1
reply
V8fun
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
Good reply above. Plenty try selection straight from school but the big advantage of a degree as a backup must be considered, especially if you have good academics that’ll get you a strong university place - always aim as high as you can and be wary of turning your back on an opportunity.

It’s an important quality at selection to be interested in all aircraft types, but if you’re highly motivated for FJ - consider going to a uni that has a UAS - all the Flying hours make a big difference in your airmanship when you arrive at EFT, resulting in a big advantage.

Also, if there is another SDSR that traitorously culls a large percentage of pilot trainees you also have a backup plan via your degree. Now, many will say that this is extremely unlikely, but you should always have a backup plan.
Last edited by V8fun; 1 year ago
1
reply
BareFacedLoady
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
Seen quite a few comments stating that you should go to uni and get your degree, which you're obviously clever enough to do by the sounds of it.

All good advice but I thought I'd just throw an alternative view into the mix.

If you are looking to get into the RAF as soon as and want to fly, I would at least consider the Loadie role (Loadmaster, WSOp, ALM, crewman...all the names for the same job).

You're part of the crew and still getting airborne. Hard to give a detailed account of what exactly you'd be doing due to the 3 different branches (rotary wing, fixed, or ISTAR).

Just something to consider. All the best with the pilot stuff though, even if they are just the well paid taxi drivers of the sky
1
reply
Ikaruss
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
Dear bearded one, can I just pick you up on a point of order? The term Loady historically related to the Air Loadmaster role (ALM) which is different to the term Siggy which is reserved for the master race of (what was) Air Electronics Operators or AEOps. At the bottom of the non commissoned aircrew food chain were the Engs or Air Engineers. Nasty creatures with hairy knuckles and no social skills.

Since 2003, all 3 roles were subsumed into the horrible generic WSOp trade. However Loadies remain Loadies, and WSOp (ISR) will still (I presume) be known as Siggies (as a nod to the historical Air Signaller role). Fortunately, most Engs are now consigned to the zoo.

To the OP, good luck with your plans, but do consider the NCA route to flying if the stick monkey idea goes belly up.

To my Loady friend, good luck with your career buddy. 😀
3
reply
BareFacedLoady
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by Ikaruss)
Dear bearded one, can I just pick you up on a point of order? The term Loady historically related to the Air Loadmaster role (ALM) which is different to the term Siggy which is reserved for the master race of (what was) Air Electronics Operators or AEOps. At the bottom of the non commissoned aircrew food chain were the Engs or Air Engineers. Nasty creatures with hairy knuckles and no social skills.

Since 2003, all 3 roles were subsumed into the horrible generic WSOp trade. However Loadies remain Loadies, and WSOp (ISR) will still (I presume) be known as Siggies (as a nod to the historical Air Signaller role). Fortunately, most Engs are now consigned to the zoo.

To the OP, good luck with your plans, but do consider the NCA route to flying if the stick monkey idea goes belly up.

To my Loady friend, good luck with your career buddy. 😀
Haha thanks very much. And the Engs, bloody fine bunch of chaps the ones I've met... Mad as a box of frogs, but very nice all the same.

It's all a bit confusing. It seems you apply as a generic WSOp (then once streamed you assume the role of either sensor operator or ALM)...so I definitely get what you're saying. But anyone who may be looking to apply, I thought I'd go with the "recruitment website title" of WSOp.

Thanks for the well wishes. Looking forward to the years ahead! 😁
0
reply
Andy1973
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#9
Report 11 months ago
#9
It sounds like you’re doing all the right kinds of stuff. Just keep doing what you’re doing, and take every opportunity that comes your way to develop leadership and management skills.I don’t necessarily agree that you need to go to University before applying. If your heart is set on a flying career, and this is more important to you than obtaining a degree, then I’d apply to the RAF and to University for entry after your A-levels. If you get a pilot slot, great! If you don’t, go to Uni, join the UAS and try again in a few years time.Timing is everything with getting a pilot job. I joined when the RAF was recruiting around 120 pilots a year. If I’d have gone to University, I’d have been competing for far fewer places as defence cutbacks had significantly reduced the number of cockpits available.
Last edited by Andy1973; 11 months ago
0
reply
Surnia
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 11 months ago
#10
(Original post by Andy1973)
It sounds like you’re doing all the right kinds of stuff. Just keep doing what you’re doing, and take every opportunity that comes your way to develop leadership and management skills.I don’t necessarily agree that you need to go to University before applying. If your heart is set on a flying career, and this is more important to you than obtaining a degree, then I’d apply to the RAF and to University for entry after your A-levels. If you get a pilot slot, great! If you don’t, go to Uni, join the UAS and try again in a few years time.Timing is everything with getting a pilot job. I joined when the RAF was recruiting around 120 pilots a year. If I’d have gone to University, I’d have been competing for far fewer places as defence cutbacks had significantly reduced the number of cockpits available.
Worst case, what happens if the OP applies for pilot and is failed at some stage? The timing of it could mean they have missed out on a chance of uni and are kicking their heels for x months until they could potentially reapply for either and could go round in circles if pilot is an option at a later date.

No-one is saying they need to go to uni, but it's a good idea to get the best qualifications possible as a fallback. Plus, it's a chance to develop their personal attributes for any job application.
0
reply
Drewski
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#11
Report 11 months ago
#11
(Original post by Andy1973)
I joined when the RAF was recruiting around 120 pilots a year. If I’d have gone to University, I’d have been competing for far fewer places as defence cutbacks had significantly reduced the number of cockpits available.
But your application would have possibly been stronger for having gone to university and being exposed to all the additional opportunities to demonstrate your leadership potential...

Many factors to consider.
1
reply
Andy1973
Badges: 4
Rep:
?
#12
Report 4 months ago
#12
(Original post by Drewski)
But your application would have possibly been stronger for having gone to university and being exposed to all the additional opportunities to demonstrate your leadership potential...

Many factors to consider.
There are many factors to consider. And it is possible that a candidate can be unsuccessful on first application, but have a stronger portfolio second time round.

But if you are wanting a career as a military pilot, then it makes sense to apply at the earliest opportunity. This is a simple response to the laws of supply and demand. You might perhaps be a “stronger” candidate after university - but that is irrelevant. All that matters is to be a strong enough candidate to get a slot when slots are available.

I often see discussions on this site where applications are considered as an either/or choice. “Should I go to university or apply to the RAF/RM/Army?”. The only sensible advice is to apply to both - and then hope that you are in the fortunate position of having a difficult decision when two offers are received.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (209)
57.26%
I don't have everything I need (156)
42.74%

Watched Threads

View All