Hoxh122
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Hi, this may sound silly but I'm just wondering, do MSc psychology conversion courses indicate on their degree and transcript certs that the course is a conversion course?

I'm kinda new and unfamiliar to conversion courses (just found out about it yesterday), and I'm also wondering, whether conversion courses are regarded as inferior to 'normal' MSc? I've read somewhere in this forum that a conversion MSc is only equivalent to a bachelor's degree and would like to know if this is true. Some others have also indicate that you need to get another 'normal' MSc before you can advance to the field or be properly regarded as a Master grad in the field. Personally, I have no desire to advance to a PhD and thus, am just wondering from the perspective of prospective employers.
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marinade
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(Original post by Hoxh122)
Hi, this may sound silly but I'm just wondering, do MSc psychology conversion courses indicate on their degree and transcript certs that the course is a conversion course?

I'm kinda new and unfamiliar to conversion courses (just found out about it yesterday), and I'm also wondering, whether conversion courses are regarded as inferior to 'normal' MSc? I've read somewhere in this forum that a conversion MSc is only equivalent to a bachelor's degree and would like to know if this is true. Some others have also indicate that you need to get another 'normal' MSc before you can advance to the field or be properly regarded as a Master grad in the field. Personally, I have no desire to advance to a PhD and thus, am just wondering from the perspective of prospective employers.
Some would get a bit annoyed at that and say it's the conversion course that's the 'normal' MSc and it's other MScs that are the distortion. They are ranked equally, although the conversion may be very broad and in some cases other MScs may be more specific.

A master's degree that is a conversion course outranks any undergraduate degree. That's only if it matters.

MRes > MSc > MSci > BSc etc.

However, it's worth noting what people may actually mean by 'equivalent'.

1) masters' degrees as popularised in the UK were designed to be conversion courses, so someone could retrain quickly. In this sense they are equivalent to a bachelor's or other undergraduate degree.

2) As in many things in life a master's degree may not be relevant to the field. Is a master's relevant to be a barista or a cleaner? No. Sadly it may also be the case for other things that sound more relevant. So for example in clinical psychology what matters is having a BPS accredited degree + experience (and as most people fulfil this easily, experience matters even more). It doesn't matter if it is undergrad or postgrad (as long as it is accredited - many aren't). There is a debate about this, because masters' degrees are so common now in psychology (1 in 4 go on to get one) whether it does put you at a disadvantage? The thought isn't broadcast very loud, but some savvy people actually do masters' degrees as there is a beefy placement attached, or an extra year to get voluntary experience.

For things like Forensic, my understanding is if you're lucky enough to get onto that route, you will then do another MSc in Forensic Psychology. However really in some ways this is the wrong way to think about it, these roles are basically job training under the umbrella of a degree - the same as a clinical doctorate.

In psychology it's also a bit weird because on clinical/educational a clinical neuropsychologist comes after clinical/educational and it's an additional master's qualification usually called QiCN to avoid confusion.

For example in other jobs such as low intensity psychological wellbeing practictioner you would then need to get 'another' postgrad qualification a PGDip, but again it's really a training job where you do qualification alongside.
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bones-mccoy
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I'd say conversion MSc's are seen as equal to other ones in the Psychology field, just more broad. So if you want to go into a specific area, you'll probably end up doing another MSc as well.

I did a conversion course but mine was a PgDip so equivalent to 2/3 of an MSc (although I did a PgCert before which made up the other 1/3), these aren't as common anymore as most conversion courses tend to be MSc's.
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