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Diploma in Economics in Manchester - To accept to not to accept? watch

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    I'm looking for a little bit of advice. I graduated from the University of Manchester last summer with a First in Anthropology and Archaeology, winning a prize for the best undergraduate results in my department and was unsure what to do next. I tried working in archaeology for a while and though I found work easily and was told I should be able to progress up the ladder pretty quickly the ladder in archaeology is very short. I soon realised that, as a friend of mine who also recently graduated with a degree in archaeology put it - "Archaeology is not the future".

    I have now just finished a 5 month internship in the Council of the European Union in Brussels, in the Fisheries Department, and have decided I want to go back to university to study economics - with a focus on the areas of natural resources, environment, agriculture, food, development etc.. I studied economics for my leaving certificate (Irish A-level) and got an A (437 UCAS points altogether) and have excellent references from tutors at university and my advisor on my internship. I looked into diplomas in economics as a way into a masters programme but Cambridge wanted an A in A-level maths and I only got a B in my leaving cert. The two year routes at LSE and Oxford want at least some economics/maths/statistics at undergraduate level. I have none of these, my degree was entirely free of numbers but I'm quite sure i could handle it with a bit of refreshment.

    I have been in touch with Manchester as their diploma allows you to take two modules of specialisation in the areas of economics I mentioned I am interested in above. They have told me they will accept me to start this september but I have now read a lot of messages which are very negative towards Manchester's economics department in forums on this site and others. What should I do? Accept the offer? Anyone got any other suggestions? Would this diploma be enough to get me on to a masters in Oxbridge, LSE or similar? Whether it is a 1 or 2 year track is unimportant but funding is vital as I cannot support myself beyond this diploma. I am considering continuing to PhD if funding is available.

    Sorry for the long post!
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    If you are really interested in Economics then you should accept.

    But you need to be aware A-level Economics and postgraduate economics is very different. It's a mathematical subject and not a humanities subject. Since you aiming for LSE, the maths score for GRE is above 700. The reason why I am telling you this because you are coming from a non-mathematical undergraduate. I have no intention to scare you away from economics. But you need to consider if you want invest your time (a master +PhD) in a mathematical subject. And maths in Economic postgraduate is far from A-level maths more like 1st-2nd year undergraduate maths. I believe, with your interest, politics postgraduate can be an alternative.

    I am not sure if Manchester diploma will cover the contents for masters in LSE and Oxbridge. You need to check what the content entails. If Manchester doesn't cover what LSE and Oxbridge needs, you might need to do a second diploma in LSE and Oxbridge. Tbh, Manchester's Economic Department is good but not the top. It depends on what you want to do. But if it's academia then you should aim for the top.
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    Why don't you take this year and do A level maths? If you can afford the time.

    It would show committment and enthusiasm?
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    (Original post by dilemminator)
    I have now just finished a 5 month internship in the Council of the European Union in Brussels, in the Fisheries Department, and have decided I want to go back to university to study economics - with a focus on the areas of natural resources, environment, agriculture, food, development etc.. I studied economics for my leaving certificate (Irish A-level) and got an A (437 UCAS points altogether) and have excellent references from tutors at university and my advisor on my internship. I looked into diplomas in economics as a way into a masters programme but Cambridge wanted an A in A-level maths and I only got a B in my leaving cert. The two year routes at LSE and Oxford want at least some economics/maths/statistics at undergraduate level. I have none of these, my degree was entirely free of numbers but I'm quite sure i could handle it with a bit of refreshment.
    (Original post by dilemminator)
    I have been in touch with Manchester as their diploma allows you to take two modules of specialisation in the areas of economics I mentioned I am interested in above. They have told me they will accept me to start this september but I have now read a lot of messages which are very negative towards Manchester's economics department in forums on this site and others. What should I do? Accept the offer? Anyone got any other suggestions? Would this diploma be enough to get me on to a masters in Oxbridge, LSE or similar? Whether it is a 1 or 2 year track is unimportant but funding is vital as I cannot support myself beyond this diploma. I am considering continuing to PhD if funding is available.
    Here is the post I wrote for prospective undergraduates in terms of uni characteristics:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=619184
    Hence it may help you to get a feel of uni quality.
    and here is the wiki entry on economics:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/Economics_Degree
    But the top 5 are commonly accepted to be LSE,Cambridge/Oxford,UCL/Warwick.

    Diploma courses are also run at Warwick, Nottingham and Southampton. They are basically the 2nd year of an undergraduate degree. If you check out prospects you should get a complete list:
    http://www.prospects.ac.uk/cms/ShowP...aynocompress=1

    But I think you will find it hard to get into top unis. As with LSE and Oxford they will want students who have done numeric degrees,

    (Original post by dilemminator)
    Would this diploma be enough to get me on to a masters in Oxbridge, LSE or similar? Whether it is a 1 or 2 year track is unimportant but funding is vital as I cannot support myself beyond this diploma. I am considering continuing to PhD if funding is available.
    Further it will be one thing to get into an msc course and another to get funding. I think your chances of getting funding are low: there is not much funding of postgraduate economics and you will be competing against students with 3 years of education. And the funding is done on a 1+3 basis

    (Original post by dilemminator)
    Anyone got any other suggestions?
    A diploma course will not have much employment value in itself (i.e. it is “only” the middle third of a degree). So instead I suggest you check out the prospects list above for a 1 year msc course focused on the areas of your interests.
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    Open university maths course?
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    Thanks for all the suggestions everyone, I suspect I will do the Manchester diploma this year, if only to help me decide what to do next.

    I enjoyed economics at A-level but I may decide its not for me at postgraduate. I generally consider myself more of a qualitative than a quantitative thinker (at least thats what I told a careers quiz on a website yesterday). And maybe politics is good idea too. My interest in economics spurs largely from the belief that economics is what the people who rule the world use to make decisions and that it would therefore be a good idea to understand it. However, my experience in Brussels was that economics provides the basis for policy proposals but only those policies which are politically acceptable ever see the light of day.

    I quite fancied studying something a little more tangible for my masters though, something that elicts more than mild confusion and/or pity from the people who run stalls at careers fairs, as telling them I studied anthropology and archaeology tended to do. But I'm young, maybe I'll just take a(nother) year out to think about it. How old is too old to make up your mind?
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    Nothing is too late, unless you're dead I recommend you to look at policy studies courses. Policy studies are what involves real society. Maybe you should look at the states, they are far more generous in terms of funding than UK. Give a look at the likes of Harvard KSG. They offer policy studies master and doctorate which are less abstract than DPhil of Economics in content. Unlike economics, policy studies is more multidisciplinary than just rigorous mathematics. I think the difference between economic policy studies and economics is like the difference between engineering and physics.
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    If you only have enough money for 1 year
    then you want to do THE course and not just A course.
    If are not particluarly quantative then it is unlikely that you will be particularly interested in /good at a diploma in economics. And certainly unlikely for you to do well enough to get funding to do a masters.
    Hence for you to do the diploma is for me a shocking decision.
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    To Second TSRreader, why not have a look at the political economy/policy side of things? You could always look at doing an OU undergrad economics degree too if you wanted.

    I lifted a few courses you might be interested in from the LSE website - obviously most of these courses exist elsewhere, I'm just being lazy.

    http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/gradu...calEconomy.htm
    http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/gradu...(Research).htm
    http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/gradu...cialPolicy.htm
    http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/gradu...Governance.htm
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    Just checked out the diploma Noticeboard at Warwick and this year only 2 people made the grade to stay on and do the msc.
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    (Original post by Paulwhy)
    Just checked out the diploma Noticeboard at Warwick and this year only 2 people made the grade to stay on and do the msc.
    But im sure the stats suggest only 2-5 people or something in that area, did the diploma last year?

    I am concerned about you mentioning the diploma having no employment benefits Considering im starting it next year for partly that reason and i do enjoy econ
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    No matter, i just realised how old this thread was
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    (Original post by chap54)
    No matter, i just realised how old this thread was
    no problem
    in 08/09 12 students passed (this year no indication of whether they were allowed to pass to the msc or not).
    But when I did the msc there were 18 students. and I think 15-20 is normal.

    (Original post by chap54)
    I am concerned about you mentioning the diploma having no employment benefits Considering im starting it next year for partly that reason and i do enjoy econ
    You need to conisder my comments within the context of my above post. i.e. a diploma on it's own does not have much employment value. But it is a pathway to an msc that does.
 
 
 

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