Patent attorney

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Neurocandid
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#1
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#1
Any graduates got into patent attorney scheme or considering?
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oMatt
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#2
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#2
Hey, I recently got a graduate job as a trainee patent attorney starting in September
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Neurocandid
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#3
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(Original post by oMatt)
Hey, I recently got a graduate job as a trainee patent attorney starting in September
Congrats!!! Is this in London? Did you do any post grad studies? And what was your degree in

Thanks
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oMatt
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#4
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#4
(Original post by Neurocandid)
Congrats!!! Is this in London? Did you do any post grad studies? And what was your degree in

Thanks
I actually found one in Brighton (Dehns) which I prefer as don't have to worry about commuting into London (except the first 3 months when studying at QM).

I didn't do any post grad studies, although 40% of candidates have done apparently. My degree is MEng Mechanical Engineering / Biomedical Engineering.
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oMatt
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#5
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#5
(Original post by Neurocandid)
Any graduates got into patent attorney scheme or considering?
Have you also been applying for trainee patent attorney roles?
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Neurocandid
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#6
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#6
Is there any difference when you undertake post grad studies or not? Also, how are you finding it so far
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oMatt
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#7
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#7
(Original post by Neurocandid)
Is there any difference when you undertake post grad studies or not? Also, how are you finding it so far
Well a PhD is obviously going to strengthen your application but the same job training is required either way so no difference in terms of a better role etc.

I actually don't start until September (I graduate this year)
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Neurocandid
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#8
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#8
(Original post by oMatt)
Well a PhD is obviously going to strengthen your application but the same job training is required either way so no difference in terms of a better role etc.

I actually don't start until September (I graduate this year)
Oh really? I plan to do a an MSc then try my luck next year
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oMatt
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Neurocandid)
Oh really? I plan to do a an MSc then try my luck next year
Yeah I think that's the best plan. My advice would be to apply as early as possible (I started applying when uni started so my final interviews were in December), and to use the ipcareer handbook (my uni careers centre had them) to find places to apply to and all the information you need.
(https://www.ipcareers.co.uk/bookstor...ent-attorneys/)
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Neurocandid
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#10
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#10
(Original post by oMatt)
Yeah I think that's the best plan. My advice would be to apply as early as possible (I started applying when uni started so my final interviews were in December), and to use the ipcareer handbook (my uni careers centre had them) to find places to apply to and all the information you need.
(https://www.ipcareers.co.uk/bookstor...ent-attorneys/)
You’re a legend! Thank you
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oMatt
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#11
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#11
(Original post by Neurocandid)
You’re a legend! Thank you
No problem! - If you want any application advice or information closer to the time hit me up.
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Rker443
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#12
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#12
(Original post by Neurocandid)
Any graduates got into patent attorney scheme or considering?
Hey, I am in my final year studying Mechanical Engineering BEng and have got a job as a trainee patent attorney in London starting in September. Let me know if you have any questions!
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fatimalatif806
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#13
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#13
(Original post by Rker443)
Hey, I am in my final year studying Mechanical Engineering BEng and have got a job as a trainee patent attorney in London starting in September. Let me know if you have any questions!
How hard difficult is it to get a job as a trainee, especially those who haven’t done a phd? I’m about to start uni this year and I’m going to be doing an MSci in biochemistry, and I’m interested in becoming a patent attorney. As for location, I don’t mind moving for a job. I’m getting a bit worried now because I’ve seen some people say not to even bother applying if you don’t have a phd, and how there are very few jobs available etc.
Last edited by fatimalatif806; 8 months ago
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oMatt
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#14
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#14
(Original post by fatimalatif806)
How hard difficult is it to get a job as a trainee, especially those who haven’t done a phd? I’m about to start uni this year and I’m going to be doing an MSci in biochemistry, and I’m interested in becoming a patent attorney. As for location, I don’t mind moving for a job. I’m getting a bit worried now because I’ve seen some people say not to even bother applying if you don’t have a phd, and how there are very few jobs available etc.
Hiya,

I know I'm not the person you asked but figured I'd give you my experience.

Whilst getting a job as a trainee is competitive it's definitely not the case that you need a PhD (at least not at my firm and many others that I applied to, as I don't have one). This is especially true if you're willing to move location as you're increasing your chances.

In the meantime, you could try getting in to one of the (probably even more competitive) placement schemes that some firms offer. This year my firm had a 2 week placement for about 12 students which I imagine would boost your chances when applying (but again, not a requirement at all).

Otherwise, it just comes down to doing well academically and maybe getting some work experience that you can use to highlight your problem solving/analytical/communication skills.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask
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fatimalatif806
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#15
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#15
(Original post by oMatt)
Hiya,

I know I'm not the person you asked but figured I'd give you my experience.

Whilst getting a job as a trainee is competitive it's definitely not the case that you need a PhD (at least not at my firm and many others that I applied to, as I don't have one). This is especially true if you're willing to move location as you're increasing your chances.

In the meantime, you could try getting in to one of the (probably even more competitive) placement schemes that some firms offer. This year my firm had a 2 week placement for about 12 students which I imagine would boost your chances when applying (but again, not a requirement at all).

Otherwise, it just comes down to doing well academically and maybe getting some work experience that you can use to highlight your problem solving/analytical/communication skills.

If you have any other questions, feel free to ask
Thank you for your response.
How have you liked your first year as a trainee patent attorney. Is there anything you didn’t expect about the job? Anything that you were pleasantly surprised by?
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oMatt
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#16
Report 8 months ago
#16
(Original post by fatimalatif806)
Thank you for your response.
How have you liked your first year as a trainee patent attorney. Is there anything you didn’t expect about the job? Anything that you were pleasantly surprised by?
No problem!

I've really enjoyed it as a job - it has great hours (I work 9-5), all the work is independent (I prefer that to working in a group), I never feel particularly stressed, and it has amazing pay (at least compared to a 'standard' engineering job) .

I had no idea what to expect as I hadn't heard of the career before I applied, but everything has been a pleasant surprise really. As long as you don't mind doing lots of reading/writing/independent work and having exam-based career progression then it should be fine.
Last edited by oMatt; 8 months ago
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beemergangm123
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#17
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#17
(Original post by oMatt)
No problem!

I've really enjoyed it as a job - it has great hours (I work 9-5), all the work is independent (I prefer that to working in a group), I never feel particularly stressed, and it has amazing pay (at least compared to a 'standard' engineering job) .

I had no idea what to expect as I hadn't heard of the career before I applied, but everything has been a pleasant surprise really. As long as you don't mind doing lots of reading/writing/independent work and having exam-based career progression then it should be fine.
Hi,
I'm considering applying for trainee positions this year so I'm very grateful for your insights. I wanted to ask what happens when you come across patent ideas that were complex and you couldn't understand them.
Also, any tips for the interviews/application process?
Thanks
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oMatt
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#18
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#18
(Original post by beemergangm123)
Hi,
I'm considering applying for trainee positions this year so I'm very grateful for your insights. I wanted to ask what happens when you come across patent ideas that were complex and you couldn't understand them.
Also, any tips for the interviews/application process?
Thanks
Hi,

As you'd expect from new inventions a lot are way more complex than something I would normally be able to understand. However, because everything has to be explained in the patent's description I can always understand the idea enough by reading that I can argue as required.

When drafting a patent, you liaise with the inventor so that they can provide input as to whether you've said something wrong or have missed something out so again it's normally fine to not understand an idea straight away.

My tip for the application process is always to use the ipcareers guide and shoot off applications (mostly cv+cover letter) to as many of the firms listed in there as possible. Just make sure to highlight examples of the relevant skills as the vast majority of applicants won't have any direct patent-related work experience.

For interviews, my experience was that you should revise the fundamentals of your subject and how certain objects function (I.e as an engineer some example questions I had were 'draw the speed-time graph of a skydiver' and 'how does a fridge work' or 'how does a radio presenter's voice in the studio reach your ears in the car') and then also try and understand your way around a patent and how their protection works (i.e you might have to read two patents and analyse whether one could be considered to infringe the other (with guidance from the interviewer) or the same but with one physical object and one patent).
Last edited by oMatt; 8 months ago
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fatimalatif806
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#19
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#19
(Original post by oMatt)
Hi,

As you'd expect from new inventions a lot are way more complex than something I would normally be able to understand. However, because everything has to be explained in the patent's description I can always understand the idea enough by reading that I can argue as required.

When drafting a patent, you liaise with the inventor so that they can provide input as to whether you've said something wrong or have missed something out so again it's normally fine to not understand an idea straight away.

My tip for the application process is always to use the ipcareers guide and shoot off applications (mostly cv+cover letter) to as many of the firms listed in there as possible. Just make sure to highlight examples of the relevant skills as the vast majority of applicants won't have any direct patent-related work experience.

For interviews, my experience was that you should revise the fundamentals of your subject and how certain objects function (I.e as an engineer some example questions I had were 'draw the speed-time graph of a skydiver' and 'how does a fridge work' or 'how does a radio presenter's voice in the studio reach your ears in the car') and then also try and understand your way around a patent and how their protection works (i.e you might have to read two patents and analyse whether one could be considered to infringe the other (with guidance from the interviewer) or the same but with one physical
On your course, do you know if other people also landed jobs as a trainee patent attorney?
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fatimalatif806
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#20
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#20
(Original post by oMatt)
Hi,

As you'd expect from new inventions a lot are way more complex than something I would normally be able to understand. However, because everything has to be explained in the patent's description I can always understand the idea enough by reading that I can argue as required.

When drafting a patent, you liaise with the inventor so that they can provide input as to whether you've said something wrong or have missed something out so again it's normally fine to not understand an idea straight away.

My tip for the application process is always to use the ipcareers guide and shoot off applications (mostly cv+cover letter) to as many of the firms listed in there as possible. Just make sure to highlight examples of the relevant skills as the vast majority of applicants won't have any direct patent-related work experience.

For interviews, my experience was that you should revise the fundamentals of your subject and how certain objects function (I.e as an engineer some example questions I had were 'draw the speed-time graph of a skydiver' and 'how does a fridge work' or 'how does a radio presenter's voice in the studio reach your ears in the car') and then also try and understand your way around a patent and how their protection works (i.e you might have to read two patents and analyse whether one could be considered to infringe the other (with guidance from the interviewer) or the same but with one physical object and one patent).
Also it’s so mad that you are doing the job that I dream of. I really hope I become a patent attorney, it’s all I think about haha
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