Should new legislation be brought in to tackle transport overcrowding in London? Watch

EtonWorldDoppler
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Overcrowding is mostly an issue during rush hour on tubes and several mainline suburban rail services in and around London.

At times, especially on the tubes, it is "severe". This is nothing new. Some lines have upgraded trains, increased capacity and increased frequency with new trains. Yet, overcrowding has still drastically increased over the last decade.

However, is the "problem" sufficiently serious enough to question whether a legal passenger limit should be placed on underground trains etc? (Currently there is no legal limit, despite "health and safety concerns.)
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EpicChefUK
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(Original post by EtonWorldDoppler)
Overcrowding is mostly an issue during rush hour on tubes and several mainline suburban rail services in and around London.

At times, especially on the tubes, it is "severe". This is nothing new. Some lines have upgraded trains, increased capacity and increased frequency with new trains. Yet, overcrowding has still drastically increased over the last decade.

However, is the "problem" sufficiently serious enough to question whether a legal passenger limit should be placed on underground trains etc? (Currently there is no legal limit, despite "health and safety concerns.)
I saw a rather drastic video of Victoria station about a year or two ago, and the station was so packed full they sounded the fire alarm to try and get some people out. There was a photo of people packed on a platform like sardines, right up to the edge, and there was pindrop silence apart from the announcement repeating saying "would all passengers leave this station immediately". It was quite scary even to watch.
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SnowMiku
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(Original post by EtonWorldDoppler)
Overcrowding is mostly an issue during rush hour on tubes and several mainline suburban rail services in and around London.

At times, especially on the tubes, it is "severe". This is nothing new. Some lines have upgraded trains, increased capacity and increased frequency with new trains. Yet, overcrowding has still drastically increased over the last decade.

However, is the "problem" sufficiently serious enough to question whether a legal passenger limit should be placed on underground trains etc? (Currently there is no legal limit, despite "health and safety concerns.)
If a limit was put in place, it might only anger people because everybody has an equal right to be on it and use it. I'd support it for people only going 1-2 stops (that are close together) though, if it was something major, like a severe heatwave.

Also, more support for buses and bike schemes (e.g superhighways) in central London could help reduce pressure.

The overcrowing itself is probably due to population growth, so bigger trains + better ventilation seem to be the only way forward, other than more stations and moving existing stations to above ground where possible.

Note: I have only ever visited London.
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imlikeahermit
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I feel it necessary to point out that London already get a ridiculous amount of money spent on it per head for transport than the rest of the country, and increase on this would surely not please those living outside of London.

The nature of the LU trains being DOO means that you are relying on people on the platform knowing when to stop boarding, when there is no more space. Some people still try to shoehorn themselves on no matter what. More presence is needed staff wise at some of the busier stations.
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ByEeek
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I don't understand why we still work 9-5. Makes no sense given technological solutions to the problems that would arise from a bit of flexibility.
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999tigger
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(Original post by EtonWorldDoppler)
Overcrowding is mostly an issue during rush hour on tubes and several mainline suburban rail services in and around London.

At times, especially on the tubes, it is "severe". This is nothing new. Some lines have upgraded trains, increased capacity and increased frequency with new trains. Yet, overcrowding has still drastically increased over the last decade.

However, is the "problem" sufficiently serious enough to question whether a legal passenger limit should be placed on underground trains etc? (Currently there is no legal limit, despite "health and safety concerns.)
How would you be enforcing that?
Perhaps there are other means?
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EtonWorldDoppler
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(Original post by 999tigger)
How would you be enforcing that?
Perhaps there are other means?
Although I haven't quite yet fleshed that out, but initially, it could involve the use of artificial intelligence/software to monitor passenger levels. Secondary barriers on platforms (in the busiest stations in and around central London etc) may sound a little absurd (if not costly), but that can be fleshed out later if considered thoroughly...

Obviously prior to any such legislation, there will be further fleshing out and committees and reports and investigations and ideas will be brought to the table etc...
Last edited by EtonWorldDoppler; 4 weeks ago
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EtonWorldDoppler
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(Original post by imlikeahermit)
I feel it necessary to point out that London already get a ridiculous amount of money spent on it per head for transport than the rest of the country, and increase on this would surely not please those living outside of London.

The nature of the LU trains being DOO means that you are relying on people on the platform knowing when to stop boarding, when there is no more space. Some people still try to shoehorn themselves on no matter what. More presence is needed staff wise at some of the busier stations.
The thought of secondary barriers (at the busiest stations in and around central etc) inside may initially sound daunting (and costly) to some but ideas can be fleshed out at a later stage.

As stated above, a combination of artificial intelligence/software to monitor in-tube/in-train passenger levels in real-time (carriage by carriage etc) and secondary barriers is an initial idea, although I'm sure brighter ideas may be forthcoming in the future...
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ThomH97
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(Original post by ByEeek)
I don't understand why we still work 9-5. Makes no sense given technological solutions to the problems that would arise from a bit of flexibility.
Indeed, or even work from home more given how much is computer based. Anyone able to commute into London is close enough to have good internet connection at home.
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