The end of class based politics? Watch

Arran90
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#1
Does the general election result indicate that the traditional Labour Conservative political divide based on social class is coming to an end?

Where do you think the dividing lines are now in politics? Is it age? Is it location? Is it education? Is it social values rather than economic matters? Is it knowledge of a foreign language?!

In Scotland the SNP appears to be very successful at transcending social class to the point where they are effectively a classless political party.

The Brexit Party and formerly UKIP are deemed to be to the right of the Conservatives but they more strongly attract people in the C2DE socioeconomic groups or those without higher education than those in the ABC1 socioeconomic groups or those with higher education, or what you could call left behind folk in the provincial towns of England.

In contrast, the Green Party is a party of the political left that tends to attract comfortably well off (but not wealthy) people with degrees who live trendy lifestyles and read the Guardian and listen to Radio 4, but they are ineffective at attracting manual and menial workers, the poor and downtrodden, or even what you could call common folk.
0
reply
ByEeek
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 weeks ago
#2
I think the divide is still there but Labour are not representing the traditional electorate any more. In Scotland Labour have been replaced by the SNP.
2
reply
Smack
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 weeks ago
#3
(Original post by Arran90)
Does the general election result indicate that the traditional Labour Conservative political divide based on social class is coming to an end?
Yes, see below:

Spoiler:
Show




As I said yesterday, once you're in your early thirties, you're more likely not to vote Labour than vote for them. This is also an issue for the Tories, who you probably don't vote for unless you're over 60 now.

Class has been replaced by age.
1
reply
SexySloth
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 weeks ago
#4
None of the parties really stand after the interests of the working class. Labour supporters and labour party openly dislikes the working class outside of London. Especially with Corbyn as the leader, they were certain to lose.
3
reply
generallee
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#5
Report 3 weeks ago
#5
We used to be a society divided above all by class and age, and geographic and national difference with these islands and politics reflected it.

Not we are divided by everything. Class and age still, geographic difference less, but national more, ethnic origin, religion (of many creeds) or its lack, sexuality, support for the EU, or opposition, you name it, it divides us.

And politics doesn't reflect that. It hasn't caught up.
3
reply
Gundabad(good)
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 weeks ago
#6
There will always be division in politics, mainly between the working class (a mixture of lower classes) and the upper class (a mixture of higher classes). The poor will always resent the rich for having what they haven't got and will vote anyone in power that offers a better "solution" to inequality.
0
reply
999tigger
Badges: 19
#7
Report 3 weeks ago
#7
This was a one off situation.
Unique massive event like Brexit.
Unelectable opposition leader, with a big list of things wrong with him.
In the event the government doesnt deliver for those northern seats they will go straight back.
Governments get stale, which is when the other lot gets a go, unless they sabotage themselves.
0
reply
DSilva
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#8
Report 3 weeks ago
#8
Age and education.

If you are below 30 and a university graduate you are far more likely to vote Labour.
1
reply
Rakas21
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#9
Report 3 weeks ago
#9
There is also a gender aspect. Unlike all other post war Tory wins the Tories won in 2010, 2015 and 2017 with only the male vote. In this election we won both but the margin was still only 6% amongst women vs 19% for men.

I do wonder whether feminism vs alt right attitudes comes into play here.
1
reply
Gundabad(good)
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#10
Report 3 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by DSilva)
Age and education.

If you are below 30 and a university graduate you are far more likely to vote Labour.
Very sad that young people just blindly support Labour, isn't it?
1
reply
DSilva
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#11
Report 3 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by Gundabad(good))
Very sad that young people just blindly support Labour, isn't it?
Not at all. No more so than the old blindly supporting the Tories.

Young people obviously feel most represented by Labour. As a young person, there wasn't really anything in the Tory manifesto that would make you want to vote for them.
1
reply
Arran90
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by Smack)
As I said yesterday, once you're in your early thirties, you're more likely not to vote Labour than vote for them. This is also an issue for the Tories, who you probably don't vote for unless you're over 60 now.

Class has been replaced by age.
My mother said that age has always been a factor with politics. During the post war decades under 30s gravitate more to Labour and over 60s gravitate more towards Conservatives. The Lib-Dems are more balanced out in terms of the age of voters.

I am thinking about whether the situation has intensified since Jeremy Corbyn took over as leader of Labour due to various other factors that are more prominent now than in the past. One possible candidate is home ownership and how a smaller percentage of under 30s are homeowners, or even working towards home ownership, than at any time since the 1970s, whereas over 60s who are homeowners are at the highest level since the 1970s.

It was notable how a sizeable fraction of 'working class' folk who became homeowners in the 1980s and 1990s turned their nose up at Labour and voted Conservative even though they weren't rich and often didn't have very good jobs.

Therefore could British society be divided by home ownership more than social class? The 20 somethings who are degree educated and tick many of the boxes for middle class but rent because they cannot afford to buy a house vote Labour. The 60 somethings who left school at 16 and tick many of the boxes for working class but own their house because they bought it when it was more affordable vote Conservative.
0
reply
Yukikobestgirl
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#13
Report 3 weeks ago
#13
(Original post by SexySloth)
None of the parties really stand after the interests of the working class. Labour supporters and labour party openly dislikes the working class outside of London. Especially with Corbyn as the leader, they were certain to lose.
as a working class person, an avid labour supporter I struggle to see this.
I mean maybe you mean working class outside of cities in which case I fall under but I believe socialism is best for the working class.
4
reply
Arran90
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#14
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#14
(Original post by DSilva)
Age and education.

If you are below 30 and a university graduate you are far more likely to vote Labour.
The clue was in the name. Labour was established to represent folk who left school at the earliest possible age and worked in menial and manual jobs in factories and coal mines; married by the age of 21; and had no interest social mobility but instead wanted a comfortable life as a member of the working class.

Labour was not established to represent university graduates who want professional and white collar jobs.
1
reply
Arran90
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#15
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#15
(Original post by Rakas21)
There is also a gender aspect. Unlike all other post war Tory wins the Tories won in 2010, 2015 and 2017 with only the male vote. In this election we won both but the margin was still only 6% amongst women vs 19% for men.

I do wonder whether feminism vs alt right attitudes comes into play here.
Interesting thought. Is Britain moving away from politics of left and right towards the American system of liberal and conservative?
0
reply
DuckDodgers
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#16
Report 3 weeks ago
#16
Not for me. If you look at the voting patterns for remain/leave in 2016 then it shows a high amount of leave voters were working class. I assume that these same people probably lent their votes to the Tories this time round. https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-...-eu-referendum
Last edited by DuckDodgers; 3 weeks ago
0
reply
Stiff Little Fingers
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#17
Report 3 weeks ago
#17
(Original post by SexySloth)
None of the parties really stand after the interests of the working class. Labour supporters and labour party openly dislikes the working class outside of London. Especially with Corbyn as the leader, they were certain to lose.
This is only true if you use working class to mean white northerner who wants them to reopen t'racism mill. In reality students and minorities are overwhelming working class, and even this traditional working class would be well served by labours manifesto. The issue is not the failure to represent the needs of the working class, but that class consciousness in general in missing in this country, and honestly generally around the world - fascism is on the march again: from Bolsanaro to Trump to Duerte, plus parties like AfD getting their highest vote shares; and it always starts with those earning £1000 an hour rigging the system to convince those earning £12 an hour that it's those earning £7.50 an hour that are robbing them (rather than the parasitical bosses and landlords), preventing the working class from actually mobilising together.
0
reply
DSilva
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#18
Report 3 weeks ago
#18
(Original post by Arran90)
The clue was in the name. Labour was established to represent folk who left school at the earliest possible age and worked in menial and manual jobs in factories and coal mines; married by the age of 21; and had no interest social mobility but instead wanted a comfortable life as a member of the working class.

Labour was not established to represent university graduates who want professional and white collar jobs.
Society changes though. We used to have a huge unionised manufacturing sector in the country. That formed the bedrock of Labour support. We no longer have that as a country.
0
reply
ThomH97
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#19
Report 3 weeks ago
#19
While this election wasn't entirely decided by Brexit, it was a hugely significant factor that can't be ignored, and (hopefully) won't appear at the next election either.

Boris had a plan that he was believably committed to, Corbyn was going to defer to the electorate again which wasn't necessarily a bad thing, but he needed to take a stance on it far sooner.
0
reply
Arran90
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#20
Report Thread starter 3 weeks ago
#20
(Original post by DSilva)
Society changes though. We used to have a huge unionised manufacturing sector in the country. That formed the bedrock of Labour support. We no longer have that as a country.
The blue collar working class of old that formed the bedrock of the Labour support base is a fraction of its former size but what has emerged since the 1980s is a new working class in low skilled low paid positions in the service sector like restaurant and fast food workers, retail, call centre workers, delivery drivers, Amazon warehouse staff, people on zero hour contracts and agency temps. Labour did have some difficulty attracting this new working class in the service sector back in the 1980s and early 1990s, but after the 1997 general election it was well within the prime voting demographic for Labour and those who didn't vote Labour tended to shun the Conservatives.

Jeremy Corbyn's Labour may not resonate well with the blue collar working class of old in the north and the West Midlands but how well does it connect with the new working class in the service sector?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

How many universities have you heard back from?

0 (77)
14.47%
1 (70)
13.16%
2 (66)
12.41%
20.11%
21.24%
5 (99)
18.61%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed