Traffic lights - waiting in 1st gear or neutral Watch

Dumpdgger
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#61
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The driving instructors stupidly say leave it in gear. But forget that once you have passed. If you are waiting in gear at traffic lights or a road junction and say for example someone hits you up the back, your foot will probably inadvertently slip off the clutch pedal and you will leap forward into the crossing traffic. After allit only takes a second to put it in gear ready to move off.
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the bear
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this thread is 11 years old :emo:
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julietlima3
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#63
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(Original post by Dumpdgger)
The driving instructors stupidly say leave it in gear. But forget that once you have passed. If you are waiting in gear at traffic lights or a road junction and say for example someone hits you up the back, your foot will probably inadvertently slip off the clutch pedal and you will leap forward into the crossing traffic. After allit only takes a second to put it in gear ready to move off.
1. there's no reason why you can't be waiting in first gear but with the handbrake on.
2. the clutch pedal has nothing to do with whether you'll be propelled forwards by an impact from the rear.
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Dumpdgger
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The impact is not what is propelling you forward, but the car being in gear when clutch released puts it in drive mode which sends you forward. Unfortunately a lot of drivers don't use the handbrake when waiting but just hold it on the footbrake.
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julietlima3
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(Original post by Dumpdgger)
The impact is not what is propelling you forward, but the car being in gear when clutch released puts it in drive mode which sends you forward. Unfortunately a lot of drivers don't use the handbrake when waiting but just hold it on the footbrake.
This is just wrong. From the conservation of momentum, to basic common sense, you're just wrong. You think the force of a car slamming into you from behind is less than the idle ticking of an engine driving a car forwards in first gear? If anything, being in gear would be better than being in neutral if you were hit from behind, as then you have engine braking to help.
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IWMTom
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(Original post by julietlima3)
This is just wrong. From the conservation of momentum, to basic common sense, you're just wrong. You think the force of a car slamming into you from behind is less than the idle ticking of an engine driving a car forwards in first gear? If anything, being in gear would be better than being in neutral if you were hit from behind, as then you have engine braking to help.
You wouldn't have engine braking because the clutch is disengaged.

This thread is 11 years old.
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TheMcSame
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(Original post by IWMTom)
You wouldn't have engine braking because the clutch is disengaged.
I think the idea behind that part was that if your foot came off the clutch after being shunted, the impact would send you forward faster than what your car is capable of at idle RPMs in 1st gear, thus resulting in engine braking slowing you down.

Of course, you then have another issue. Shock sets in and you forget to do really obvious stuff like getting back on the clutch pedal and/or brake. If you drive a powerful petrol or pretty much any diesel, in other words, anything producing a reasonable amount of torque at low RPMs, then the car will likely crawl along under its own power at idle RPMs. That is assuming the shunt was violent enough to actually give the car enough momentum so that an idle clutch drop wouldn't stall the engine.
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Emma:-)
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#68
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(Original post by Mikimoto)
To be honest, the way I judged it was the length of time you're kept waiting. If it's going to be a while, I put it into neutral, and if it's not long I'd put it into first.
I agree
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LeMansClivey
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(Original post by julietlima3)
This is just wrong. From the conservation of momentum, to basic common sense, you're just wrong. You think the force of a car slamming into you from behind is less than the idle ticking of an engine driving a car forwards in first gear? If anything, being in gear would be better than being in neutral if you were hit from behind, as then you have engine braking to help.
How are you finding this so difficult to understand? The sequence is like this: Car hits the back of you, causes your foot to come off the clutch, car is now in gear and if it hasn't stalled will move forward under it's own power. I have seen it happen.

Also, sitting with the clutch pedal depressed for extended periods will wear out the release bearing.

If you have to stop and a pause becomes a wait, put the parking break on and the gearbox in neutral.
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julietlima3
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(Original post by LeMansClivey)
How are you finding this so difficult to understand? The sequence is like this: Car hits the back of you, causes your foot to come off the clutch, car is now in gear and if it hasn't stalled will move forward under it's own power. I have seen it happen.

Also, sitting with the clutch pedal depressed for extended periods will wear out the release bearing.

If you have to stop and a pause becomes a wait, put the parking break on and the gearbox in neutral.
In first gear. Have you tried driving faster than 10mph in first gear? If anything, the braking effects of being in first gear will help if you are struck from behind and pushed forwards at speed.
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LeMansClivey
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#71
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(Original post by julietlima3)
In first gear. Have you tried driving faster than 10mph in first gear? If anything, the braking effects of being in first gear will help if you are struck from behind and pushed forwards at speed.
In modern manual cars, if the engine is running, the car is in gear and none of the brakes are applied, the anti-stall function of the engine management system will cause it to drive along on it's own at about 5mph. It could then easily enter a junction, for example, without further driver input.
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Dumpdgger
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(Original post by LeMansClivey)
How are you finding this so difficult to understand? The sequence is like this: Car hits the back of you, causes your foot to come off the clutch, car is now in gear and if it hasn't stalled will move forward under it's own power. I have seen it happen.

Also, sitting with the clutch pedal depressed for extended periods will wear out the release bearing.

If you have to stop and a pause becomes a wait, put the parking break on and the gearbox in neutral.
At last, someone with a sensible reply. Just forget leaving it in gear.
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iMZee
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#73
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All start stop functions need to be in neutral to work anyways.
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desou
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#74
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I can't remember the last time I put my car in neutral.
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