lauren.spoonerx
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Hello, does anybody have any tips for achieving a grade 9 in WJEC Eduqas English Literature?
0
reply
ryanjj14
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Hi Lauren,
I didn't study for Eduqas English Literature, but instead studied for the WJEC counterpart instead in Wales which is VERY similar!

Background context:
I achieved an A in GCSE English Literature and was very close to an A*. I put this down to my circumstances of not being able to resit an exam which I had a B in for Of Mice and Men. I had moved at the time and couldn't attend the resit. But, on the whole, I was doing well in English Lit and know how to get a 9/A* in English Literature.

It is NOT the easiest of GCSEs for all people. Most people prefer Literature, but I prefer Language due to how comfortable I am with the Language exams. I had an A in Language too.

My tips are:
1. Make mindmaps for different questions you may think come up for each book during the year. Make your own questions up that you may feel come up. You should know how to answer these, and with practice, you will become an expert at these. Plus, they may even come up in your actual exam.

2. Practice plenty of past paper questions - new and old - and get your English teacher to mark them. While it may take them a few days to mark them, they're your teachers and they shouldn't not want to help you get the best possible grade. TIME YOURSELF ALSO!

3. Look at examiners reports for each past paper. They tell you what each candidate did well at on a question and what they wanted to see instead. They come from people who mark the exams each year, so if you memorise and absorb what examiners require for these questions, then you'll be off to a flying start.

4. Grab a piece of paper and write everything you know for each book/novel you are studying. Write down key quotes, key character qualities etc. Also, write down questions for each of the characters.

5. Print off key terms to use in the exams for each character. For example, a key term for a character could be 'animalistic'. Use these words in essays and extracts. Your teacher may give you (like mine) a sheet of terms for each character that are good to use in exams.

6. For extracts, highlight the important stuff. This might seem obvious but time goes by ever so quickly. Highlight, make important contributions. Comment on necessary things linked to the questions.

7. For essays, timed practice. Make a spider diagram and plan each paragraph structure.

Hope this helps!
1
reply
lauren.spoonerx
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by ryanjj14)
Hi Lauren,
I didn't study for Eduqas English Literature, but instead studied for the WJEC counterpart instead in Wales which is VERY similar!

Background context:
I achieved an A in GCSE English Literature and was very close to an A*. I put this down to my circumstances of not being able to resit an exam which I had a B in for Of Mice and Men. I had moved at the time and couldn't attend the resit. But, on the whole, I was doing well in English Lit and know how to get a 9/A* in English Literature.

It is NOT the easiest of GCSEs for all people. Most people prefer Literature, but I prefer Language due to how comfortable I am with the Language exams. I had an A in Language too.

My tips are:
1. Make mindmaps for different questions you may think come up for each book during the year. Make your own questions up that you may feel come up. You should know how to answer these, and with practice, you will become an expert at these. Plus, they may even come up in your actual exam.

2. Practice plenty of past paper questions - new and old - and get your English teacher to mark them. While it may take them a few days to mark them, they're your teachers and they shouldn't not want to help you get the best possible grade. TIME YOURSELF ALSO!

3. Look at examiners reports for each past paper. They tell you what each candidate did well at on a question and what they wanted to see instead. They come from people who mark the exams each year, so if you memorise and absorb what examiners require for these questions, then you'll be off to a flying start.

4. Grab a piece of paper and write everything you know for each book/novel you are studying. Write down key quotes, key character qualities etc. Also, write down questions for each of the characters.

5. Print off key terms to use in the exams for each character. For example, a key term for a character could be 'animalistic'. Use these words in essays and extracts. Your teacher may give you (like mine) a sheet of terms for each character that are good to use in exams.

6. For extracts, highlight the important stuff. This might seem obvious but time goes by ever so quickly. Highlight, make important contributions. Comment on necessary things linked to the questions.

7. For essays, timed practice. Make a spider diagram and plan each paragraph structure.

Hope this helps!
Thank you so much for the tips and well done on those results!
1
reply
ryanjj14
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by lauren.spoonerx)
Thank you so much for the tips and well done on those results!
Thank you! I loved English Literature because of my teacher. The right teacher can really make a difference.

No problem though. Best of luck in your studies. If you need any more help, don't hesistate to ask!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • Bournemouth University
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Wed, 19 Feb '20
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    Postgraduate and professional courses Postgraduate
    Wed, 19 Feb '20
  • University of Warwick
    Warwick Business School Postgraduate
    Thu, 20 Feb '20

Has your university offer been reduced?

Yes (47)
31.54%
No (76)
51.01%
Don't know (26)
17.45%

Watched Threads

View All