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    There was a thread a while back asking if anyone regretted their choice of course; well, I have no doubts about my course, but I am starting to regret my choice of college.

    For one, the things I was attracted to 10 months ago are quite different to what I’d think I’d like now, and when I applied I was more concerned with choosing the right course and getting an offer to really think about what life would be like outside of the course. I applied to corpus chirsti, which is one of the smallest colleges in cambridge; and the smallest in terms of the undergraduate population. At first, I quite liked the idea of a small college, but now I think that it’s almost too small and I’d feel claustrophobic; not just in terms of the student body (and there’ll only be something like 80 people in my entire year group) but also in terms of the buildings and grounds; it’s really quite weeny, with only two courts and no gardens so to speak of like the ones that other colleges have, and I’m starting to feel that I’d quickly get bored of the surroundings.

    By this I mean no disrespect to corpus, after all I know I’m lucky to have an offer at all, and it's obviously a beautiful college with a glowing academic reputation, but like any other college it’s not for everyone, and now I realise just how much of a difference the college makes to university life, I’m starting to wish I thought a bit more carefully about the college I applied to.

    When I visited, the colleges I really liked were places like Trinity and Clare, but I didn’t apply to them because I thought these would be really popular and I had no chance of getting in; I now realise this isn’t the case, for one thing, corpus is in itself no easy college to get into, and in terms of difficulty of entry there really isn’t any noticeable difference between corpus or any other of the most popular colleges, and I didn’t really need to be cautious. My list of prospective colleges was I think too narrow, and I was put off some colleges for really stupid reasons. At the time of sending the application, I was too busy worrying about the course and the personal statement, and I didn’t pay too much attention to the wide ranges of choices for colleges, with the end result that I’m not really happy with the one I ended up at.

    I know everyone says that you always end up loving whichever college you end up at, but does anyone else feel the same way about their perspective colleges?
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    i doubt they do.

    the physical size and amenities of the college won't be a problem at all. i've yet to meet anyone at cambridge who hates their college 'because it only has two courts'.

    whether the small student body will bother you is another matter, but i dunno. caius has about 150ish per year (maybe a bit less), and from that there's a good 50 you never see (internationals and geeky folk), then another 50 i'm not particularly interested in seeing. so, i have about 50 people i can call friends, and that's more than enough. as long as there's enough people doing your course, and enough people to go out with, you'll be fine.

    edit: just saw you're doing theology. this pushes you into an isolated existence no matter what college you're at
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    (Original post by Galatea)
    At first, I quite liked the idea of a small college, but now I think that it’s almost too small and I’d feel claustrophobic; not just in terms of the student body (and there’ll only be something like 80 people in my entire year group) but also in terms of the buildings and grounds; it’s really quite weeny, with only two courts and no gardens so to speak of like the ones that other colleges have, and I’m starting to feel that I’d quickly get bored of the surroundings.
    I wouldn't sorry too much, Galatea -- the University has a student population of around 18,000; and you are allowed out of your own college...

    Really, (and I mean this in the nicest possible way), you're worrying about nothing. So stop it.
    When you're there, go to the Freshers' Fair (on Tues/Weds of Freshers' Week), and join some interesting societies. Then get out and about and involved. This is what I did, and I spent the VAST majority of my first term outside college -- it wasn't until the 2nd term that I started making an effort to make friends in college. For me, this was the right way round (because I hate feeling hemmed-in, too). Might work for you.
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    I didn't feel that way until I turned up.
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    (Original post by Nina)
    I didn't feel that way until I turned up.
    Haha! Ouch!
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    To be fair I actually love the college size, amenities, setting etc.
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    I sometimes resent my college being on the edge of town and having architecture that looks like giant lego blocks, but I don't really dwell on it. In retrospect the cycling was actually very good for me, and I'm going to miss the exercise next year when all my lectures are practically next door (in the West Cambridge site).

    I'm sure you'll love it and hate it when you get there. If you don't, just tell yourself "At least it isn't Homerton" ^_^.

    Know a chap there, he's going to have to cycle 30 min each morning to get to the same lectures as me .
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    I wish people would stop ****ging off Homerton. It really isn't as bad a college as everyone seems to say it is, and there are some very real positives to being there, by all accounts.
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    (Original post by Galatea)
    ...When I visited, the colleges I really liked were places like Trinity and Clare (my emphasis), but I didn’t apply to them because I thought these would be really popular and I had no chance of getting in; I now realise this isn’t the case, for one thing, corpus is in itself no easy college to get into, and in terms of difficulty of entry there really isn’t any noticeable difference between corpus or any other of the most popular colleges...
    Sorry for hijacking your thread, but if I would clog up TSR with all my ponderings, it would solely consist of my threads by the time people got their rejection/offer/pool mails.

    That being said. Can someone tell me (and other people thinking of this for that matter) about the whole Clare thing? I understand that Trinity and John's are super-popular, but I for one hadn't heard of Clare until I started to really look in to colleges. Why is it so extremely oversubscribed nowadays?

    It was the single most oversubscribed college for economics last year, and unlike other colleges that tend to go "up and down" in terms of offers/year, Clare has just steadily increased in
    applicant : offer.

    Please, reassure me that this will stop or that it doesn't matter.

    On the one hand, I don't want to miss out on coming to Cambridge because I was stupid enough to choose the hardest college of the bunch. On the other hand, I don't want to end up feeling like the threadstarter if I do get an offer.

    This is silly.

    Once again, sorry for this major OT.
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    (Original post by epitome)
    I wish people would stop ****ging off Homerton. It really isn't as bad a college as everyone seems to say it is, and there are some very real positives to being there, by all accounts.
    thank you epitome!! i'm going there, my offer turned unconditional today! but it really upsets me when people say its so bad, i was pooled so didnt have a choice, but i think its going to be good and am looking forward to it, but when people say bad things like that it always makes me think twice!

    anyway, when i get there i may make a thread to discuss all the great things about this college!
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    (Original post by studentbug)
    Sorry for hijacking your thread, but if I would clog up TSR with all my ponderings, it would solely consist of my threads by the time people got their rejection/offer/pool mails.

    That being said. Can someone tell me (and other people thinking of this for that matter) about the whole Clare thing? I understand that Trinity and John's are super-popular, but I for one hadn't heard of Clare until I started to really look in to colleges. Why is it so extremely oversubscribed nowadays?

    It was the single most oversubscribed college for economics last year, and unlike other colleges that tend to go "up and down" in terms of offers/year, Clare has just steadily increased in
    applicant : offer.

    Please, reassure me that this will stop or that it doesn't matter.

    On the one hand, I don't want to miss out on coming to Cambridge because I was stupid enough to choose the hardest college of the bunch. On the other hand, I don't want to end up feeling like the threadstarter if I do get an offer.

    This is silly.

    Once again, sorry for this major OT.
    ok well i applied to Clare, and still got an offer through the pool. the thing about Clare is they get HUGE amounts of applicants, but they are the college who get the most applicants into Cambridge through the pool (i am quoting the admissions guy from the 2007 open day), in fact they said that if you apply to Clare then u have 1/3 chance of getting an offer from at least somewhere in Cambridge because they make a special effort (apparently more than other colleges) to convince other colleges to take the well deserving students that clare cant take themselves.

    hope that helps. apply there by all means, but remember you may easily be pooled!
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    (Original post by epitome)
    I wish people would stop ****ging off Homerton. It really isn't as bad a college as everyone seems to say it is, and there are some very real positives to being there, by all accounts.
    No, I'm actually sure it's great to be there. But by god it's remote.

    Although is IS close to the train/bus station, which is fairly convenient.
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    I'm a bit worried that I won't fit in to Trinity (assuming I get the grades of course). I know it's a bit silly, but I'm concerned that everyone will be really rich and from very different backgrounds to me. The accommodation letter that I was sent said something along the lines of "we understand that most people will choose the most expensive band and so some people will have to be moved down to the middle band" which worried me, since I'm going to struggle for money and have of course picked the cheapest band. I know it's silly to worry about this, but can't help thinking that the snobby rich stereotype might have some basis in fact
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    (Original post by lavalse)
    thank you epitome!! i'm going there, my offer turned unconditional today! but it really upsets me when people say its so bad, i was pooled so didnt have a choice, but i think its going to be good and am looking forward to it, but when people say bad things like that it always makes me think twice!

    anyway, when i get there i may make a thread to discuss all the great things about this college!
    You will find that it is almost always (or actually always, in my experience, but I'm sure there are a few anomalies, so I'll stick with the "almost") people who have never even been to Homerton (and would probably find it hard to point to on a map) who **** it off.

    According to the people I know there, it's got a *really* good community feel. Of course, that's partly because it's not near other colleges, so is forced to be quite self-contained; but it's a real feature of the college, so far as I can tell. It's also great for PGCE students, because there are lots of them there (they're a rare thing in the other colleges). There's no reason why anyone should have a problem with Homerton, unless they have mobility problems which make getting into town either arduous or expensive.

    As for the distance, so long as you have working legs and a bike, it's really not that problematic. Obviously, if you want to drag your double-bass or cello or harp into the centre of town there will be one or two logistical issues; but for the normal person, really, it's not as melodramatic as people's hyperbole make it out to be. But then, I live somewhere that requires a fair amount of walking/cycling to get, like, anywhere, so I don't think it's weird to have to "travel" 30 minutes. Personally, I like the space and time (not to mention exercise) that the walk/cycle affords.

    No worries, lavalse -- you make up your own mind when you get there! (Just invest in a bike, sharpish!) And make sure you get involved in the uni societies, too, so you actually have a reason to come into the centre, and get to meet people from all the different colleges. There's no good reason for Homerton, or Homertonians, to be isolated. :
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    (Original post by SunderX)
    No, I'm actually sure it's great to be there. But by god it's remote.

    Although is IS close to the train/bus station, which is fairly convenient.
    I don't think it's as remote as Girton, depends what you're doing I guess. Also, I don't think many people regret their choice of college terribly much and if they do, they probably go do university things to get wider social circles or are a hermit with no social circle.
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    (Original post by zedliv)
    I'm a bit worried that I won't fit in to Trinity (assuming I get the grades of course). I know it's a bit silly, but I'm concerned that everyone will be really rich and from very different backgrounds to me. The accommodation letter that I was sent said something along the lines of "we understand that most people will choose the most expensive band and so some people will have to be moved down to the middle band" which worried me, since I'm going to struggle for money and have of course picked the cheapest band. I know it's silly to worry about this, but can't help thinking that the snobby rich stereotype might have some basis in fact
    best be getting rich and snobby then.
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    (Original post by zedliv)
    I'm a bit worried that I won't fit in to Trinity (assuming I get the grades of course). I know it's a bit silly, but I'm concerned that everyone will be really rich and from very different backgrounds to me. The accommodation letter that I was sent said something along the lines of "we understand that most people will choose the most expensive band and so some people will have to be moved down to the middle band" which worried me, since I'm going to struggle for money and have of course picked the cheapest band. I know it's silly to worry about this, but can't help thinking that the snobby rich stereotype might have some basis in fact
    Don't worry, zedliv.
    Though that is an unfortunate wording on the accommodation form. :rolleyes:
    There will be plenty of people with lots of money at Trinity (it's probably the most famous college, so does attract plenty of 'traditional types' (who may or may not have a serious public school education and be following in the footsteps of their father, and their father's father, etc!), as well as very wealthy international students. But there will also be plenty of people from either middling or lower-income backgrounds. Remember, too, that the Newton Bursaries, given to those from the lowest-income backgrounds across the whole university, are funded by Trinity. Trinity has lots of money to give out, and it's not afraid to do so.

    It's the biggest college (as I'm sure you're already aware!), and it's home to ALL types -- from the very richest, to those who are fully-funded by bursaries and grants. The great thing about everyone being together is that, except for the occasional unfortunate example, it doesn't matter what background you're from: you can make friends with all types.

    Please don't go to Cambridge thinking you're different from everyone else at your college. You're not. Not at all. You will NOT be the only person opting for the lowest price accommodation (I certainly would have picked the same thing!). And, if the worst comes to the worst, the university is very big. You can walk out of Trinity's front door, and find your social life elsewhere. Really NOT a problem.

    (NB: There will of course be some 'snobby rich types'. But there are also some 'inverse-snobs' who don't think the 'snobby rich types' should be there, because they've "just got in with daddy's money". Both types deserve a slap. Treat everyone like human beings, and most of them will do the same. If you happen to meet a few unfortunate idiots, put it down to their ignorance, rather than their backgrounds. I've met the extremes at both ends, and I don't like either. The vast majortiy of us, though, are perfectly normal).
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    (Original post by lavalse)
    thank you epitome!! i'm going there, my offer turned unconditional today! but it really upsets me when people say its so bad, i was pooled so didnt have a choice, but i think its going to be good and am looking forward to it, but when people say bad things like that it always makes me think twice!

    anyway, when i get there i may make a thread to discuss all the great things about this college!
    Join the Assassin's Guild - it's a great way to meet people under the pretence of trying to kill them. There'll be a stall in the Fresher's Fair. Plus, being in Homerton will be a huge advantage in terms of survivability, since there'll be fewer people willing to make the journey there to bump you off . Of course, you might get something like the 'Girton Effect', where a massive party gets arranged to wipe out everyone playing in the college in one go.
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    Thanks epitome, that was really helpful
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    (Original post by SunderX)
    Join the Assassin's Guild
    worst. advice. ever.
 
 
 
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