Nahdiii
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Who is usually paid more money; an accountant or an economist ?
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ajj2000
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There isn't really a 'usually'. Most economics graduates never work as economists but use their skills in related fields. You cant become an economist with an accounting degree (with some exceptions) but lots of economics graduates work as accountants.

Which universities are you aiming for?
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Interrobang
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(Original post by Nahdiii)
Who is usually paid more money; an accountant or an economist ?
Moved this thread to the economics forum, where you're more likely to get replies
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Diplomatic
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(Original post by Nahdiii)
Who is usually paid more money; an accountant or an economist ?
The title suggests you're deciding whether to pursue a degree in economics or accountancy, which is a different question to working as an economist or accountant. You can work as an accountant with an economics degree but you generally can't become an economist without a degree in economics (in many cases you need an MSc).

They're very different academic subjects and besides using numeracy, there's very little overlap between being an accountant and an economist in practice. So being motivated by money is a bit silly, you could hate one and love the other for a relatively small difference in pay.

Whether you earn more as an economist or accountant in the UK is going to depend on where you work. Some firms pay their accountants more than e.g. the Civil Service pay their economists. Some econ consultancies or econ roles at consulting firms will pay their economists more than the Big 4 pay their accountants.
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Lancaster Student Ambassador
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(Original post by Nahdiii)
Who is usually paid more money; an accountant or an economist ?
Hey,

I'm Charlie, one of Lancaster University's student ambassadors. I'm currently in my second year of a degree in Finance & Economics.

I think with any profession, your pay will depend upon many factors. Who are you going to work for? Where are you working? What level do you want to reach? Freelance? Self employed? How many hours are you wiling to put in? Will you undertake additional training? So it's really hard to give a full answer.

I am guessing however, that your question is to do with picking your degree. In which case I would suggest taking a dual hons like myself. My degree consists of 50% accounting and finance modules alongside 50% economics modules. I really enjoy my degree and find that all of my modules go well together even though they are technically different subjects.

I hope this has helped you make your decision!

Charlie
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