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    Well, i was just reading through some thread's from some time ago, and i was wondering is it my notes that my making my grades suffer? tbh, this really sounds stupid, but i don't know how to make good notes? is this just me? because seeing as i'm going to be going into year 12 this september, i feel that my lack of good notes/organisation, may make my grades suffer. what do people think about this?:no:
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    You just need to figure out what works for you. Do you know what kind of learner you are? Because that may make a difference to how you go about learning.
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    urm, well i think i learn better by reading it, and listening to it over and over again.
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    (Original post by LittleMissTwinkle)
    Well, i was just reading through some thread's from some time ago, and i was wondering is it my notes that my making my grades suffer? tbh, this really sounds stupid, but i don't know how to make good notes? is this just me? because seeing as i'm going to be going into year 12 this september, i feel that my lack of good notes/organisation, may make my grades suffer. what do people think about this?:no:

    To be honest I wrote out loads of notes kept them in my psychology folder and never re read them, but thats just me and i found it easier to read from books, usually once I've noted something down, it usually sticks, I find writing things down lots helps me.

    So don't worry to much about notes they don't help everyone!
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    Well then you could try to make notes then slowly condense them while memorising them to the best of your abilities. If you want to listen to your notes then put them on your MP3 player/iPod and listen over and over again while memorising them.
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    (Original post by LittleMissTwinkle)
    Well, i was just reading through some thread's from some time ago, and i was wondering is it my notes that my making my grades suffer? tbh, this really sounds stupid, but i don't know how to make good notes? is this just me? because seeing as i'm going to be going into year 12 this september, i feel that my lack of good notes/organisation, may make my grades suffer. what do people think about this?:no:
    This could help... Cornell note taking system. Really good, advocated one way or another by most unis.

    http://www.ucc.vt.edu/stdysk/cornell.html
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    I've never read any of my notes! I kept my notes neatly for the first month of AS and it fell apart from there. When it comes to revising, using a good revision guide and past papers is the key thing. Its worked for me over the past two years - let's hope it works again when we get our results next month haha! :p:
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    It would help to know what kind of a learner you are..apart from that i recommend sticky notes (but not too many because then everything will be a colourful, sticky mess), highlight your books if you prefer that, ermmm ive used noticeboards with formulae on them, pieces of cardboard or whiteboard to make a teacher like lesson thing to my brain and big A3 pieces of paper on your ceiling so when you wake up you can read them....hope that gives you ideas to help your note taking techniques...
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    (Original post by piece_by_piece)
    Well then you could try to make notes then slowly condense them while memorising them to the best of your abilities. If you want to listen to your notes then put them on your MP3 player/iPod and listen over and over again while memorising them.

    but, this would be very time consuming..

    & thanks for the other replies! it's appreciated!!:woo:
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    (Original post by LittleMissTwinkle)
    but, this would be very time consuming..

    & thanks for the other replies! it's appreciated!!:woo:
    It is time consuming, but it works. I do it, and my grades are pretty decent.
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    ^^piece_by_piece, yeah, well it does take alot of work to achieve a good grade, so it would be worth it in the end. but, it would be no good for cramming:P as i always procastinate and it always comes down to cramming.
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    Yeah, I procrastinate too but I guess you just have to prioritise.
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    I've never learnt from notes, maybe you just need another method to revise?
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    What I found useful doing subjects like Politics and Geog where you have to get through a lot of material is to type of master notes using textbooks, teachers advice, random add ons, internet articles, other textbooks, studyguides etc. Then when it came to exam time I had a set of notes for every topic.

    Going about learning them is a whole different matter LOL

    But! What I would recommend would be to highlight, annotate and condense. So you would read an entire A4 page, for example, take it in, highlight the relevant bits and jot down any thoughts you had about it. The jotting down of thoughts is good because it means you are paying attention and engaging with the material.

    By the way the page need not be your own notes if you didn't fancy writing them. The page can be a textbook page.

    I'll tell you how effective this was come August. LOL. :|
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    Pah, my notes and classwork are illegible disorganised and incorrect most of the time it hasn't hampered me that much.
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    (Original post by LUFCsuperstar)
    What I found useful doing subjects like Politics and Geog where you have to get through a lot of material is to type of master notes using textbooks, teachers advice, random add ons, internet articles, other textbooks, studyguides etc. Then when it came to exam time I had a set of notes for every topic.

    Going about learning them is a whole different matter LOL

    But! What I would recommend would be to highlight, annotate and condense. So you would read an entire A4 page, for example, take it in, highlight the relevant bits and jot down any thoughts you had about it. The jotting down of thoughts is good because it means you are paying attention and engaging with the material.

    By the way the page need not be your own notes if you didn't fancy writing them. The page can be a textbook page.

    I'll tell you how effective this was come August. LOL. :|
    lol, thanks for this! well, looking at your spoiler looks like you've done EXCELLENT so far!:p:
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    I never really read my notes when revising - I made new, more concise ones. But I did have a reaaaaaly disorganised maths folder - which I think went alongside my complete lack of confidence and in hindsight I could probably have changed that for the better as it will affect my final grade.
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    i learn by reciting notes aloud and trying to remember the number of points (e.g. 9 reasons why Stalin's collectivisation policy failed). Or I remember the layout of the textbook page - e.g. what is in each corner. But i don't know how to take notes in class to help this so i don't have to re-do notes when it comes to revision. Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance
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    Thought I'd add my two cents! Hear me out!

    Firstly, my notes from class suck in general, and I never really used them a lot for revision, instead working through the organised and ordered textbook.

    With exams, my biggest problem has always been soaking in the information, and I tended to learn something but then forget the last thing, or miss bits out. When it came to the exams I didn't remember everything and write everything appropriate. I was one of those people who fooled myself believing that rewriting notes on lined paper, and learning my notes by reading through them carefully, would work well.

    Then, in revising for January re-sits this year I developed a completely new way of learning, which was revolutionary for me, turning around my exams completely, and suddenly I felt confident in my revision when walking into the exam room, and knew exactly what I had to write about.

    The method? Really stupid and crazy, which is the key to its success! Here goes...

    1. Under a topic make a list of all the things you need to know.
    e.g. Economics:Lewis 2 Sector Model -

    -Local profit reinvestment
    -Capital
    -Wage situation
    -Savings

    (4 things in this case).


    2. Take the first letter of these things (L, C, W, S) and then enter the letters into an anagram maker, such as http://www.wordplays.com/fcgi-bin/anagrams.pl . If you don't get a word or any decent words, add an A on the end (never use A as an one of the key letters). In this case, I need to add an A, and come up with CLAWS.

    3. Make an image: A bloke in my year called Lewis standing in front of me waving his massive Wolverine claws!

    4. Repeat with other topics, as many as you wish (perhaps just the crucial topics). Then build these into a setting. In this case, the Lewis 2 Sector model was part of development model section, so my Lewis image was placed in a large Harrods store, and at the entrance to the store was a person called Omar who welcomes me upon entrance ('Harrod-Domar' is another development model, so you can see the linking of the images).

    5. Eventually you'll end up with a mini-world of mneumonics for reference in the exam.
    When I was sitting with the paper in front of me in my Economics exam, instead of crapping myself as I would have done before (not quite literally), I instead thought 'Ok, this essay is about Lewis 2 Sector, what do I know about this'? Before, I would have missed stuff out, gone blank, blagged upon a few threads of knowledge, but now, my thought trail was

    '.....Lewis model......Wolverine claws....CLAWS!
    CLAWS:
    Capital
    Local profit reinvestment
    A
    Wage situation
    Savings


    Eventually, for Economics, I think I had around 275 words linked in my head, which could be recalled within a few seconds!

    Imagine doing the exam with access to a library. This method is so easy but effective that it feels like cheating.

    And lastly, you don't need a good memory for this, just half an imagination! The imagery makes the remembering and learning easy. It's really enjoyable to be creative with the revision instead of dying of boredom scanning over and over scrawled notes, and furthermore you have a huge base of knowledge in your head at the end of it.

    In addition, it provides a framework for your knowledge and understanding, and I found that with this grounding, Economics became easier and I became more confident.

    The bottom line is, I was on a C from AS-level last summer, then developed this method in Januaray for the retakes....and ended up on a high A and much more confident.

    Give it a go!
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    (Original post by zep90)
    Thought I'd add my two cents! Hear me out!

    Firstly, my notes from class suck in general, and I never really used them a lot for revision, instead working through the organised and ordered textbook.

    With exams, my biggest problem has always been soaking in the information, and I tended to learn something but then forget the last thing, or miss bits out. When it came to the exams I didn't remember everything and write everything appropriate. I was one of those people who fooled myself believing that rewriting notes on lined paper, and learning my notes by reading through them carefully, would work well.

    Then, in revising for January re-sits this year I developed a completely new way of learning, which was revolutionary for me, turning around my exams completely, and suddenly I felt confident in my revision when walking into the exam room, and knew exactly what I had to write about.

    The method? Really stupid and crazy, which is the key to its success! Here goes...

    1. Under a topic make a list of all the things you need to know.
    e.g. Economics:Lewis 2 Sector Model -

    -Local profit reinvestment
    -Capital
    -Wage situation
    -Savings

    (4 things in this case).


    2. Take the first letter of these things (L, C, W, S) and then enter the letters into an anagram maker, such as http://www.wordplays.com/fcgi-bin/anagrams.pl . If you don't get a word or any decent words, add an A on the end (never use A as an one of the key letters). In this case, I need to add an A, and come up with CLAWS.

    3. Make an image: A bloke in my year called Lewis standing in front of me waving his massive Wolverine claws!

    4. Repeat with other topics, as many as you wish (perhaps just the crucial topics). Then build these into a setting. In this case, the Lewis 2 Sector model was part of development model section, so my Lewis image was placed in a large Harrods store, and at the entrance to the store was a person called Omar who welcomes me upon entrance ('Harrod-Domar' is another development model, so you can see the linking of the images).

    5. Eventually you'll end up with a mini-world of mneumonics for reference in the exam.
    When I was sitting with the paper in front of me in my Economics exam, instead of crapping myself as I would have done before (not quite literally), I instead thought 'Ok, this essay is about Lewis 2 Sector, what do I know about this'? Before, I would have missed stuff out, gone blank, blagged upon a few threads of knowledge, but now, my thought trail was

    '.....Lewis model......Wolverine claws....CLAWS!
    CLAWS:
    Capital
    Local profit reinvestment
    A
    Wage situation
    Savings


    Eventually, for Economics, I think I had around 275 words linked in my head, which could be recalled within a few seconds!

    Imagine doing the exam with access to a library. This method is so easy but effective that it feels like cheating.

    And lastly, you don't need a good memory for this, just half an imagination! The imagery makes the remembering and learning easy. It's really enjoyable to be creative with the revision instead of dying of boredom scanning over and over scrawled notes, and furthermore you have a huge base of knowledge in your head at the end of it.

    In addition, it provides a framework for your knowledge and understanding, and I found that with this grounding, Economics became easier and I became more confident.

    The bottom line is, I was on a C from AS-level last summer, then developed this method in Januaray for the retakes....and ended up on a high A and much more confident.

    Give it a go!
    I'd just like to say that this is an absolutely fantastic post. Thanks, and well done
 
 
 
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