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    (Original post by Nikuhiru)
    It's just another variation of English. Get over yourselves and just learn to accept it. In different countries the language changes! Do you honestly believe the French spoken in France is going to be 100% the same as the French spoken in somewhere like Mauritius? People from both countries will be able to understand each other but will have different ways of saying things!

    Also certain things that American English uses are more 'original' English than what we use. For example people get really frustrated at the use of '-ize' as a suffix however for many words this is how it was originally spelled as it was derived from Greek! Heck even the Oxford English Dictionary used to list most words with '-ize' as opposed to '-ise' because to them it was more proper...and no offense to most of you but I think the OED is a greater authority on the English language than the posters on this forum!

    I admit I use a lot of Americanisms but hey, I wasn't born here! I know I've got a British accent but it doesn't mean I've got to use every single little British-ism.
    Nice post.

    I've just finished reading the twelve pages of this thread and I can't help but mention that this is quite hilarious. Movie. Film. Store. Shop. Sidewalk. Pavement. Get over it.
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    Am I the only one thinking: who cares?
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    The English language is changing very fast...particularly with new terms to do with technology and American culture. I think there is no boundary between American English and British English...since this line is becoming very blurred. English is becoming a modern language where only lingo and slang terms are used, whereas we are losing our ability to express our emotions and feelings due to these "modern terms".
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    (Original post by Petit chou)
    :rofl: just adds to the stereotype of Americans being thick lol
    haha wouldn't expect too much from them as their president is a joke.

    Top 10 'classic' quotes from Bush:
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=pCnjuJ1pbmc
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    Funny story, when my family and I went to San Francisco we had this waitress in one restaurant who could barely understand a single word we said!

    And all six of us speak basically estuary English xD
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    (Original post by Bismarck)
    So what you're saying is that despite this word being a recent addition to the English language, the British English pronunciation should take precedence over the American English pronunciation? Talk about nationalism.

    Are you serious? American English is far more efficient than the British version. There has been an attempt to make words be written the way they are pronounced. How exactly is having extra letters in words that aren't pronounced efficient?
    And are you being serious? The point of English is to express notions with clarity and effectiveness. This is precisely my point: extra words are inefficient, or certainly ineffective. Are you the type of person who would also agree with redundancies and tautologies as well as 'obese' language?
    I wasn't speaking specifically about excessive letters in words like 'gotten' but yes, that is my general idea. A language is not effective if there are unnecessary letters all over the place because it encourages sloppiness.
    As for your sentiments on American English being an attempt to 'correct' traditional English in the way in which it is spoken or written, I completely disagree with you and if it was a genuine 'attempt', it has failed dismally (as we would all expect).

    Is a keen English student a nationalist or obsessive because he or she criticizes American English? Quite simply, we do not object to American English because it is American. Our grievance is with it effectively butchering a lot of our language.

    I also think that words like 'mom', etc are not correctly the way we speak. I wouldn't make too many bones about that sort of thing but there are so many other impediments in American English. Please read some books on grammar and the English language.
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    (Original post by samperry209)
    yes!!!!

    we bloody invented english so talk it!!
    Oh the irony
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    (Original post by Mumintroll)
    For me, -ise sounds more as if it is an -s sound than a -z sound. But, that probably varies between dialects and accents. I don't think words such as 'colour'/'color' sound phonetically as either -our or -or personally.

    As you say, English is a complete mess when it comes to spelling. American English has not really addressed that in any meaningful way. If we wanted to adjust the language to make it more ordered and/or phonetic, there would have to be a massive linguistic reform. But that will never happen, because English is a wild beast of a language. It evolves naturally and doesn't have any guardians to tame or monitor it. There is no equivalent of the mighty Académie française and even the idea of a German-style spelling reform would be an alien concept to most native English speakers. People simply wouldn't accept that any body has the power to regulate the use of language in such a black and white manor.

    As for aluminium, I think it should logically be -ium just to match most other elements which are also spelt thus, e.g. potassium. In Swedish it's also spelt -nium, and I suspect it is in most other Germanic (and possibly even other) languages. But if Americans wish to spell/pronounce it their way, then that's for them to decide. And what did logic ever have do with any version of English spelling anyway?!
    I agree with a lot of what you are saying. Have you, by any chance, read 'Lost For Words' by John Humphrys?
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    To be completely honest, yes... It seriously annoys me. It drives me insane.

    No offence to Americans, but I hate American English.
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    (Original post by Atlas of The World)
    I agree with a lot of what you are saying. Have you, by any chance, read 'Lost For Words' by John Humphrys?

    No, I have not. It sounds interesting, I think I may have noticed it in Waterstone's on one of the 3 for 2 offer tables. Perhaps, next time I'm browsing, I shall pick it up. Right now, I am trying to get through my pre-uni reading list; I've had to abandon all leisure reading!
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    (Original post by RyanT)

    But thats about it, its not a big deal beyond that - I think the Scots ruin English more then the Americans do.
    Uh, :eek:
    How?
    x
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    (Original post by Davetherave)
    These kind of discussions are pretty meaningless because there is absolutely nothing fundamental or pure about what people today think is "British English". If someone from the 1850s heard what people British English sounded like these days they would be appalled, just as they would in turn appal someone from the 1750s. More importantly, a lot of what people today think are Britishisms are actually old Americanisms and a lot of what people think are Americanisms were first recorded in Britain. Language is dynamic, deal with it.
    For instance, the word "hotel" in terms of a place to spend the night for a fee is an Americanism. There are scores of other words that are now mainstream English across the globe that began as Americanisms. It's completely idiotic to pretend that British English and American English are two separately evolving languages that are only now beginning to become "polluted" because of TV and internet or whatever.
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    I hate when people say 'soccer.' No, it's football! We were talking to a Peruvian guy in America and he asked if we liked soccer, to which we exclaimed 'football!' and he was like, wow, someone who uses the proper word!

    It also annoys me how they say 'different than.' eg. 'This top is different than that one' - it just sounds ******ed!

    And they seem to think the word 'romantical' is real. That really peeves me off.
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    (Original post by sakura_starfall)
    Jut wondering, does anyone get irritated when you hear British people using American-English phrases instead of British English? I don't mind when the person is American, but it always irritates me slightly when i hear British people saying "sidewalk" "diaper" "parking lot" etc.....

    Just wondered what people thought!
    i like american english
    but i like englishy stuff like ''bloody hell'' ..ahahhahahaha
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    (Original post by Mumintroll)

    No, I have not. It sounds interesting, I think I may have noticed it in Waterstone's on one of the 3 for 2 offer tables. Perhaps, next time I'm browsing, I shall pick it up. Right now, I am trying to get through my pre-uni reading list; I've had to abandon all leisure reading!
    Tell me about it! I've got all my pre-reading to do for philosophy; a ridiculous amount, too.
    You really should read 'Lost For Words'. It covers all of the implications of grammatical English, American English, etc. It also covers how much political campaigns are affected by the party-leader's use of language, and how much language manipulation takes place within the political arena. It is one of my favourite books.
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    No, not really. They can talk as they want in their country.
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    It annoys me considerably
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    From Americans, it doesn't really bother me. When British people use it, it can irritate me, especially if they're not just using the odd "movie" but huge amounts of what they are saying are Americanisms.

    To all those saying "who cares", well obviously the people complaining do.
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    Yes.
 
 
 
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