Should the government force fee-paying schools to toughen entry requirements? Watch

EtonWorldDoppler
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As a young man who once attended a fee-paying school, I think it's ridiculous that "poor" people can enrol their kid into a school they "barely" have the ability to pay for. I was not from a "rich" family and I did not live "well". My parents were not "rich". I was not super-"clever" and not "special".

Currently, if I remember correctly, once a kid has passed any entrance exams to a fee-paying school and a place is avalaible for them, a deposit is then needed (sometimes as little as £1,000), but no ability to pay evidence/documents is actually asked for/required.

However, when you are seeking a loan or mortgage from a financial institution, you have to go through a rigorous process and supply accompanying evidence. Why not the same with fee-paying schools?

Ergo, should the government bring in new legislation forcing fee-paying schools to make it a requirement for entrants to display the ability to pay much like in the same way banks and lenders request (e.g. payslips, bank documents, employment history, investment holdings, employer references etc)?

(Think of it as saving "poor" people from themselves/their poor decisions...)
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999tigger
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(Original post by EtonWorldDoppler)
As a young man who once attended a fee-paying school, I think it's ridiculous that "poor" people can enrol their kid into a school they "barely" have the ability to pay for. I was not from a "rich" family and I did not live "well". My parents were not "rich". I was not super-"clever" and not "special".

Currently, if I remember correctly, once a kid has passed any entrance exams to a fee-paying school and a place is avalaible for them, a deposit is then needed (sometimes as little as £1,000), but no ability to pay evidence/documents is actually asked for/required.

However, when you are seeking a loan or mortgage from a financial institution, you have to go through a rigorous process and supply accompanying evidence. Why not the same with fee-paying schools?

Ergo, should the government bring in new legislation forcing fee-paying schools to make it a requirement for entrants to display the ability to pay much like in the same way banks and lenders request (e.g. payslips, bank documents, employment history, investment holdings, employer references etc)?

(Think of it as saving "poor" people from themselves/their poor decisions...)
Government has better things to do with its time.
Why do you think this is even an issue worthy of legistation? It is not.
Schools set their own entry requirements and checks, if they dont work they can change them.
You have very weird ideas what you think government is for.
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Vinny C
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I think it ridiculous that rich people should be able to buy their way into a good school when their children don't merit it. just look at Diane Abbot's son, for example. A fortune thrown at his education and he ends up biting a policeman!
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Parties
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(Original post by Vinny C)
I think it ridiculous that rich people should be able to buy their way into a good school when their children don't merit it. just look at Diane Abbot's son, for example. A fortune thrown at his education and he ends up biting a policeman!
Rich people do that because they are desperately trying to make sure that their kids get a decent education, much like anyone else would. Issue is, is that those kids are often (stereotypically) not disciplined well (spoilt) and aren't used to real-world challenges (played life on easy mode too early or for too long), so they don't take things seriously until its too late.
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That'sGreat
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Is there a reason who abused the speech marks more than Epstein ab- *banned*
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Vinny C
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(Original post by Parties)
Rich people do that because they are desperately trying to make sure that their kids get a decent education, much like anyone else would. Issue is, is that those kids are often (stereotypically) not disciplined well (spoilt) and aren't used to real-world challenges (played life on easy mode too early or for too long), so they don't take things seriously until its too late.
But wouldn't it have been better to teach him something more appropriate... such as shoe shining or dominoes?
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EtonWorldDoppler
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(Original post by Parties)
Rich people do that because they are desperately trying to make sure that their kids get a decent education, much like anyone else would. Issue is, is that those kids are often (stereotypically) not disciplined well (spoilt) and aren't used to real-world challenges (played life on easy mode too early or for too long), so they don't take things seriously until its too late.
You missed my point or you didn't read my OP. It should *only* be these who can AFFORD to send their kids to these schools that should be able to. Poor kids (like I was) aren't spoilt but somehow they manage to get into these schools and be educated there for a few years.
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EtonWorldDoppler
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Government has better things to do with its time.
Why do you think this is even an issue worthy of legistation? It is not.
Schools set their own entry requirements and checks, if they dont work they can change them.
You have very weird ideas what you think government is for.
You didn't read my OP, did you?

Financial institutions like banks and loan providers have to adhere to a basic minimum of government regulations.

I am saying that fee-paying schools should also have similar laws regulating them as well (like requiring parents to demonstrate the ability to pay), much like you can't just get a mortgage or a loan without passing a certain standard of requirements.
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bubblecat
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fee-paying schools are “stupid” and “divisive” and should be “banned” by the “government”
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williamho
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if the parents can afford to send their children to expensive private boarding school etc, sounds ok with me.
the normal /average fee at a secondary school boarding school is about GBP 35,000 per year.

the end result whether it a private school or a public school, is how many grade A per subject that you can achieve.

if you have the motivation and the drive, you can do extremely well in a public school.
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.unknown
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(Original post by EtonWorldDoppler)
You missed my point or you didn't read my OP. It should *only* be these who can AFFORD to send their kids to these schools that should be able to. Poor kids (like I was) aren't spoilt but somehow they manage to get into these schools and be educated there for a few years.
Why would the parents send their kids to private school if they cant afford it in the first place?
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999tigger
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(Original post by EtonWorldDoppler)
You didn't read my OP, did you?

Financial institutions like banks and loan providers have to adhere to a basic minimum of government regulations.

I am saying that fee-paying schools should also have similar laws regulating them as well (like requiring parents to demonstrate the ability to pay), much like you can't just get a mortgage or a loan without passing a certain standard of requirements.
Financial institutions are completely different and have the potential to do the economy wide ranging damage.
A school is just the same as other non profit organisations.
You havent indicated that there is an actual issue with this, no different from any other business.
The school can do as much credit checking as it wishes.

Schools can self regulate just like the majority of businesses. If they lose money they can tighten up entry requirements themselves.or they will go out of business. No need for government intervention especially as you have provided no evidence there is an abnormal issue.
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EtonWorldDoppler
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Financial institutions are completely different and have the potential to do the economy wide ranging damage.
A school is just the same as other non profit organisations.
You havent indicated that there is an actual issue with this, no different from any other business.
The school can do as much credit checking as it wishes.

Schools can self regulate just like the majority of businesses. If they lose money they can tighten up entry requirements themselves.or they will go out of business. No need for government intervention especially as you have provided no evidence there is an abnormal issue.
Most fee-paying schools are on The Charity Register and in order to be on there, they must adhere to certain regulations of the Charity Commission.

I can't see why it's so hard to see what I'm outlining here.

Basic legislation should be brought in making it a requirement for fee-paying schools in UK territory to do basic financial checks (similar to when applying for a mortgage or a loan). It's not just money laundering concerns, but just questioning some folks' ability to actually pay.

Fee-paying schools Fe already regulated to some extent, so I don't see a problem bringing in some sensible extra regulations.

( Jesus, I think I might need to become an MP ten years from now just to table this bill haha)
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999tigger
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(Original post by EtonWorldDoppler)
Most fee-paying schools are on The Charity Register and in order to be on there, they must adhere to certain regulations of the Charity Commission.

I can't see why it's so hard to see what I'm outlining here.

Basic legislation should be brought in making it a requirement for fee-paying schools in UK territory to do basic financial checks (similar to when applying for a mortgage or a loan). It's not just money laundering concerns, but just questioning some folks' ability to actually pay.

Fee-paying schools Fe already regulated to some extent, so I don't see a problem bringing in some sensible extra regulations.

( Jesus, I think I might need to become an MP ten years from now just to table this bill haha)
Yet you havent shown there is an actual need for this and schools are quite capable of doing their own checks. If they did not do so they would be out of business in short order. Utterly pointless piece of legislation.
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ByEeek
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What a pompus post. The only criteria for going to a fee paying school is ability to pay. Ability has nothing to do with it. All the privilage and money behind the royals still only saw Charles and William scraping 2.2s at uni.
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EtonWorldDoppler
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(Original post by ByEeek)
What a pompus post. The only criteria for going to a fee paying school is ability to pay. Ability has nothing to do with it. All the privilage and money behind the royals still only saw Charles and William scraping 2.2s at uni.
How is it pompous? I was a poor boy from a poor family. My OP isn't coming from a rich person. My point is just that - the ability to actually pay the fees! It should be a requirement that evidence should be supplied/demonstrate how they hope to pay for their child's education.

How different is this from the government trying to protect consumers from predatory lenders or super-high interest rates or speed limits on motorways or height restrictions in towns and cities?
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EtonWorldDoppler
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Yet you havent shown there is an actual need for this and schools are quite capable of doing their own checks. If they did not do so they would be out of business in short order. Utterly pointless piece of legislation.
"schools are quite capable of doing their own checks"

The point is that they aren't doing them! They're businesses (even if registered non-profits). Most have waiting lists, so if some parent can't afford next year's fees and the child is expelled (and their education disrupted), then there'll be another kid to quickly fill their place!

The government must step in and make it mandatory for these checks to be carried out/these requirements to be followed.
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999tigger
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(Original post by EtonWorldDoppler)
"schools are quite capable of doing their own checks"

The point is that they aren't doing them! They're businesses (even if registered non-profits). Most have waiting lists, so if some parent can't afford next year's fees and the child is expelled (and their education disrupted), then there'll be another kid to quickly fill their place!

The government must step in and make it mandatory for these checks to be carried out/these requirements to be followed.
The school has credit control. If it doesnt keep it under control then they will go out of business.
Schools dont seem to be clamouring for it.
How about the parents take some responsibility and work out if they have enough money to send to private school.

Waste of government time and there are more important issues to be legislated.
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EtonWorldDoppler
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(Original post by 999tigger)
The school has credit control. If it doesnt keep it under control then they will go out of business.
Schools dont seem to be clamouring for it.
How about the parents take some responsibility and work out if they have enough money to send to private school.

Waste of government time and there are more important issues to be legislated.
I'm sorry to say it but some parents are stupid (I mean, remember that some people actually believe in "God" and have "faith" in "miracles"), so you can't exactly say that people are "responsible"...

Your last bit is silly, come on. There is lots of legislation in force which could be considered "pointless"...
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999tigger
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(Original post by EtonWorldDoppler)
I'm sorry to say it but some parents are stupid (I mean, remember that some people actually believe in "God" and have "faith" in "miracles"), so you can't exactly say that people are "responsible"...

Your last bit is silly, come on. There is lots of legislation in force which could be considered "pointless"...
You have failed to make out any meaningful need or case for such legislation.
I didnt say all parents are responsible I said they should be responsible for their own actions.
Private schools are elitist I would rather they reform the state education system, which affects many more people.
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