B1544 – Reform of the Gender Recognition Act (2004) Watch

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Baron of Sealand
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#81
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(Original post by Glaz)
Nay
If it's not a mental illness nor a mental disorder, then it's just a matter of personal choice and thus all the procedures should be paid for privately.
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Glaz
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#82
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(Original post by Baron of Sealand)
If it's not a mental illness nor a mental disorder, then it's just a matter of personal choice and thus all the procedures should be paid for privately.
Refer to post #80
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Baron of Sealand
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#83
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(Original post by shadowdweller)
I'm a little confused by this statement - regardless of whether it is a mental illness, it is classified as a medical condition. As a medical condition, why would NHS treatment not be appropriate?
Because if there's nothing "wrong" to "fix", it's just a matter of personal choice. The NHS should only be there to treat illnesses and disorders.

However, that is not relevant to this particularly bill.

In the NHS page quoted above, I read this:

"In most cases, this type of behaviour is just part of growing up and will pass in time, but for those with gender dysphoria it continues through childhood and into adulthood."

From this, I can see why it should not start before one reaches adulthood, since in most cases, this type of behaviour is just part of growing up and will pass in time, and medical professionals are seemingly only concerned with those who has it continues through childhood and into adulthood.
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shadowdweller
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(Original post by Baron of Sealand)
Because if there's nothing "wrong" to "fix", it's just a matter of personal choice. The NHS should only be there to treat illnesses and disorders.

However, that is not relevant to this particularly bill.

In the NHS page quoted above, I read this:

"In most cases, this type of behaviour is just part of growing up and will pass in time, but for those with gender dysphoria it continues through childhood and into adulthood."

From this, I can see why it should not start before one reaches adulthood, since in most cases, this type of behaviour is just part of growing up and will pass in time, and medical professionals are seemingly only concerned with those who has it continues through childhood and into adulthood.
A medical condition would still not be personal choice though, in relation to your first point?

The latter would come back to being a part of the diagnosis stage in my view.
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#85
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(Original post by Glaz)
We're talking about whether gender dysphoria is a mental illness or a mental condition and according to the NHS, it is a condition, not an illness.
What is the difference? They are all euphemistic synonyms: illness, condition, disorder, problem, abnormality.
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Baron of Sealand
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#86
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(Original post by shadowdweller)
A medical condition would still not be personal choice though, in relation to your first point?

The latter would come back to being a part of the diagnosis stage in my view.
My understanding of the term "medical condition" is still that it's an illness or a disorder, but just a softer term. So I'm not sure how I should understand what a "medical condition" is. Like I said, however, that's not relevant to this bill, really in any way.

From the link you gave me, to get the certificate, one would already have to be living in that gender for an extended period of time. This means not only would we be recognizing the identity before one reaches adulthood, we would be recognizing the behaviour that happened years before reaching adulthood.

If according to the NHS in "most cases", the behaviour will pass before reaching adulthood, then I don't think we should be taking into account of the behaviour during childhood until we can be sure that it is being continued into adulthood.

As far as I know, the NHS considers "adulthood" at 18, and I believe biologically, people don't even finish their basic development until 25 years of age. Then there's the legal aspect of choices generally are made by parents when someone is under 18, so if we're seeking legal consistency, this should still not be done.
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#87
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This item has entered cessation.
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#88
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Division, clear the Lobby!
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