carxlinefxrbes_
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I'm revising for my mocks but saw some posts saying it's not worth writing up my notes for the actual exams yet.

Basically, my way of revising is using the Cornell note method per page in the revision guide for subjects such as sciences and geography. (English I just do practise q's). My question is, is it worth properly writing up all of the notes for the actual exams now as a method of revision or should I just make short ones and flashcards/mindmaps now (saving writing the notes for my actual exam revision)?

(Writing these notes seems to be the best method of revision that works for me but I would like to try flashcards also [is it worth doing them now]).
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
I'm revising for my mocks but saw some posts saying it's not worth writing up my notes for the actual exams yet.

Basically, my way of revising is using the Cornell note method per page in the revision guide for subjects such as sciences and geography. (English I just do practise q's). My question is, is it worth properly writing up all of the notes for the actual exams now as a method of revision or should I just make short ones and flashcards/mindmaps now (saving writing the notes for my actual exam revision)?

(Writing these notes seems to be the best method of revision that works for me but I would like to try flashcards also [is it worth doing them now]).
It's always worth doing if it works for you and if you're going to get something from it. If you're just re-writing notes to make them look pretty then it's inefficient but by the sounds of it, re-writing them helps you so go for it!

If you think flashcards would be useful then do a mixture of both now. I found that the process of making the flashcards was often the biggest revision help, instead of actually going over them as you have to condense the information down and you might identify weak areas as you go along.

Good luck with your mocks, hope all goes well
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xmelanieee
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(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
I'm revising for my mocks but saw some posts saying it's not worth writing up my notes for the actual exams yet.

Basically, my way of revising is using the Cornell note method per page in the revision guide for subjects such as sciences and geography. (English I just do practise q's). My question is, is it worth properly writing up all of the notes for the actual exams now as a method of revision or should I just make short ones and flashcards/mindmaps now (saving writing the notes for my actual exam revision)?

(Writing these notes seems to be the best method of revision that works for me but I would like to try flashcards also [is it worth doing them now]).
Hey, i did my GCSEs last year. I havent heard of the Cornell note method but I've just looked it up so I have an idea of what it is. When you say 'writing up all of the notes' do you mean copying the text from the revision guide onto paper?
From experience that did help but only to a certain point, i did find that flashcards with questions on one side and the answers on the other helped more. Also it's not too late to start making flashcards however, i'd recommend you make less only because you should be spending your time going over previous notes made rather than writing info down that you won't remember after a few minutes
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carxlinefxrbes_
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
It's always worth doing if it works for you and if you're going to get something from it. If you're just re-writing notes to make them look pretty then it's inefficient but by the sounds of it, re-writing them helps you so go for it!

If you think flashcards would be useful then do a mixture of both now. I found that the process of making the flashcards was often the biggest revision help, instead of actually going over them as you have to condense the information down and you might identify weak areas as you go along.

Good luck with your mocks, hope all goes well
I do re-write the notes into my own shorthand but write out directly from the revision guide for things like key definitions (as in the exams they'll want them word for word) but I think I'll also try and write flashcards too.

Thank you for the advice and the good luck message!
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Elco11
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Psychologically we remember information that we have encoded ourselves- this means basically written in our own person words.

Make precise and blunt notes in your own words using the revision techniques that work for you e.g flash cards or mind maps. Either way it needs to be personal to you in order for you to be able to remember it.
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brainzistheword
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(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
I do re-write the notes into my own shorthand but write out directly from the revision guide for things like key definitions (as in the exams they'll want them word for word) but I think I'll also try and write flashcards too.

Thank you for the advice and the good luck message!
Sounds like a good plan! That's the best bit about revision - it's always different for everyone. I used to have post it notes everywhere (and I mean everywhere!) along with mind maps and little summary cards that I'd try to use in every spare 5 minutes I could find. Would love to know how you get on!
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carxlinefxrbes_
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(Original post by xmelanieee)
Hey, i did my GCSEs last year. I havent heard of the Cornell note method but I've just looked it up so I have an idea of what it is. When you say 'writing up all of the notes' do you mean copying the text from the revision guide onto paper?
From experience that did help but only to a certain point, i did find that flashcards with questions on one side and the answers on the other helped more. Also it's not too late to start making flashcards however, i'd recommend you make less only because you should be spending your time going over previous notes made rather than writing info down that you won't remember after a few minutes
By writing notes, I summarise them into my own shorthand but directly write out things such as key definitions and things the examiners want basically word for word. (From the revision guides) I have an exercise book to write notes up into (one for each subject and in geography papers eg. One for human geog and one for physical). I've started making a few flashcards like that for chemistry and they seem to be helping so I think I'll try them out for other subjects as well.
Thank you for the advice
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carxlinefxrbes_
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(Original post by brainzistheword)
Sounds like a good plan! That's the best bit about revision - it's always different for everyone. I used to have post it notes everywhere (and I mean everywhere!) along with mind maps and little summary cards that I'd try to use in every spare 5 minutes I could find. Would love to know how you get on!
I'll admit there are a few post-it notes on my wall and I have the physics equations stuck to my bedroom ceiling! However, I'll try the revision methods I mentioned earlier and see how I do and hopefully update on here how it goes (if I remember aha)
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xmelanieee
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(Original post by carxlinefxrbes_)
By writing notes, I summarise them into my own shorthand but directly write out things such as key definitions and things the examiners want basically word for word. (From the revision guides) I have an exercise book to write notes up into (one for each subject and in geography papers eg. One for human geog and one for physical). I've started making a few flashcards like that for chemistry and they seem to be helping so I think I'll try them out for other subjects as well.
Thank you for the advice
No problem, just make sure you read over what you write because I made the mistake of doing that the night before the exams! What you're doing doesnt seem to be a bad idea at all but yes do try the flashcards. I used mindmaps for english lit quotes and geography case studies, not sure if that'll help you but you could try
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