Are premium anti-reflective coatings worth the cost on glasses?

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Anonymous #1
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I'm aware that most glasses purchased from opticians will come with some form of anti-reflective coatings, but they also offer upgrades with improved anti-reflective coating over the standard one.

For the people that have purchased the superior coating was it worth the cost? I'm currently debating whether I should just settle for the free one or pay for the better anti-reflective coating. Just a pity that they can't show me an example of one with standard coating and one with the better coating.
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black tea
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Is there a reason you are considering the superior coating? I have the normal one and I can't say I've ever found it inadequate for anything I do.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by black tea)
Is there a reason you are considering the superior coating? I have the normal one and I can't say I've ever found it inadequate for anything I do.
No particular reason really, just the typical spiel from the opticians that say it's better for driving at night due to all the glare from headlights and reflections on glasses when taking photos. That's just making me think whether I should just go for the better one or not considering I'll be wearing it all the time. As you say though that you've found it fine for everything so far so it might not be worth it.
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black tea
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I can't comment about driving but lack of reflections in glasses on photos isn't something I personally would choose to pay extra for. Hopefully, someone who has tried the superior coating will be able to give their opinion!
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by black tea)
I can't comment about driving but lack of reflections in glasses on photos isn't something I personally would choose to pay extra for. Hopefully, someone who has tried the superior coating will be able to give their opinion!
Thanks! The cost isn't actually that much (£30) but if it makes little to no difference then I would rather save that money too. Seems like I am leaning more towards the standard coating at the moment.
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iMazzaH
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Hi guys I‘m a Student Dispensing Optician and just thought I’d help explain a few things of what an anti reflective coating does;So the coating is on the front and back surface to stop excessive artificial light travelling through the lens it does this by creating a destructive light wave to the same amplitude of the original light source which tries the pass through the lens. So all the coating does is stop excessive lights such as reflections or light scattering reduced. Now if you wear your glasses all the time you can appreciate it as for you it’s like either looking through a super clear piece of plastic or a cheap empty plastic coke bottle. Now this is the difference in a superior coating: in the standard coating to create the reflection of light in the same amplitude for the lens to work, the coating make the lens VERY easy to smear even with just a finger print can be a pain to clean off however the superior coating is hydrophobic so it repels water which keeps it smear PROOF and that is very very handy for full time spectacle wearers. All in all it’s exceptionally useful, but in my opinion an extra around £30 usually so if you’re on a budget and your prescription hanged often then don’t keep forking out for it but if you got the dough then grab it.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by iMazzaH)
Hi guys I‘m a Student Dispensing Optician and just thought I’d help explain a few things of what an anti reflective coating does;So the coating is on the front and back surface to stop excessive artificial light travelling through the lens it does this by creating a destructive light wave to the same amplitude of the original light source which tries the pass through the lens. So all the coating does is stop excessive lights such as reflections or light scattering reduced. Now if you wear your glasses all the time you can appreciate it as for you it’s like either looking through a super clear piece of plastic or a cheap empty plastic coke bottle. Now this is the difference in a superior coating: in the standard coating to create the reflection of light in the same amplitude for the lens to work, the coating make the lens VERY easy to smear even with just a finger print can be a pain to clean off however the superior coating is hydrophobic so it repels water which keeps it smear PROOF and that is very very handy for full time spectacle wearers. All in all it’s exceptionally useful, but in my opinion an extra around £30 usually so if you’re on a budget and your prescription hanged often then don’t keep forking out for it but if you got the dough then grab it.
Thanks for your reply, that was very useful! The benefits does sound very useful and worth the extra but I heard the anti-reflective coating does wear off over time as you clean your glasses. Do you know the average lifespan of the superior coating? Also if the coating does wear off (and assuming my prescription doesn't change) can the coating be reapplied on the old lenses?
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm aware that most glasses purchased from opticians will come with some form of anti-reflective coatings, but they also offer upgrades with improved anti-reflective coating over the standard one.

For the people that have purchased the superior coating was it worth the cost? I'm currently debating whether I should just settle for the free one or pay for the better anti-reflective coating. Just a pity that they can't show me an example of one with standard coating and one with the better coating.
I tried an AR coating a few years ago and hated it. It basically made the reflections that I saw green (although less bright). I'm very sensitive to anything unnatural in my vision, so really disliked this.
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iMazzaH
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks for your reply, that was very useful! The benefits does sound very useful and worth the extra but I heard the anti-reflective coating does wear off over time as you clean your glasses. Do you know the average lifespan of the superior coating? Also if the coating does wear off (and assuming my prescription doesn't change) can the coating be reapplied on the old lenses?
The old technology used for the coating wears off but the superior one is much better and lasts years. If it doesn’t at least last two years by law it must be replaced under a manufacture guarantee so I would opt for the superior one for peace of mind.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by iMazzaH)
The old technology used for the coating wears off but the superior one is much better and lasts years. If it doesn’t at least last two years by law it must be replaced under a manufacture guarantee so I would opt for the superior one for peace of mind.
Nice one, thank again! I'm going to go for the superior coating.

One final question though; I'm also considering the lenses with the blue light filter as I'm on the computer for around 8-10 hours per day. Do you think that the blue light filter add-on is worth the money, and how effective is it in reality (i.e. would you pay to get the blue light filter add-on yourself)?
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Kathy89
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Depends on the company who makes them.
I ordered oleophobic coating from zenni optical (a nice chinese website I buy glasses from) and it is awful, however, their regular AR coating is good. The oleophobic coating is easy to clean but the lenses are getting smudges so fast and you literally need to clean them every few hours just to see through the lenses. Zenni's standard AR is not as easy to clean, but I can clean the glasses once a week or even less...
Shamir Glacier coating on the other hand is one of the best I ever used. Almost invisible, easy to clean and not getting dirty that fast, in addition the blue light filter there is great, almost no change in colors.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Kathy89)
Depends on the company who makes them.
I ordered oleophobic coating from zenni optical (a nice chinese website I buy glasses from) and it is awful, however, their regular AR coating is good. The oleophobic coating is easy to clean but the lenses are getting smudges so fast and you literally need to clean them every few hours just to see through the lenses. Zenni's standard AR is not as easy to clean, but I can clean the glasses once a week or even less...
Shamir Glacier coating on the other hand is one of the best I ever used. Almost invisible, easy to clean and not getting dirty that fast, in addition the blue light filter there is great, almost no change in colors.
Thanks! I plan on getting the lenses from an actual bricks and mortar opticians but I guess even then the quality there can vary quite a bit. There are so many options with lenses and the differences in quality for certain add-ons make it even more confusing. The blue light filter is meant to help by reducing eye fatigue and helps you sleep better but if I don't really have those problems I'm not sure if it's worth the cost. If there are actual health or vision benefits to it as well then I would get it, but I don't think that that's the case here?
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Kathy89
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks! I plan on getting the lenses from an actual bricks and mortar opticians but I guess even then the quality there can vary quite a bit. There are so many options with lenses and the differences in quality for certain add-ons make it even more confusing. The blue light filter is meant to help by reducing eye fatigue and helps you sleep better but if I don't really have those problems I'm not sure if it's worth the cost. If there are actual health or vision benefits to it as well then I would get it, but I don't think that that's the case here?
You can ask to try them on, most of the stores have a trial pair of non prescription (0 power) glasses with the blue filter lenses they work with and you can try them for a few minutes to see if you feel better with them.
I was highly recommended UV++ lenses (blue block and UV protection) because I have light colored eyes and live in Israel where there is so much sunlight here it's actually not healthy. I don't wear sunglasses and most of the time wear regular glasses when outside, but still I doubt there is a real health benefit for it in the UK.
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