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    BMAT Section 3 Question. (Week 4 question)

    It is not important for patients to be actively involved in their treatment.

    Write a unified essay in which you address the following:

    What do you understand by this statement? Explain why it might be argued that patients should be actively involved in their treatment. Discuss whether there are circumstances where patients should not be involved in their treatment.
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    ooh this is a good one! i'm gonna get working on this when i've done my chemistry
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    nice one too
    i'll do this one as soon as i'm done my physics homework
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    Yes i am pretty good at making BMAT essay questions.
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    Nice one im going to have to have a go
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    (Original post by x.beth.x)
    Does anyone have a list of the physics topics we need to know for the BMAT?
    I'm just reading my GCSE revision guides, I mean this book says double award GCSE without the earth and beyond, and seismic waves. CGP guides got me through GCSE physics fine anbd this BMAT book recommends GCSE Physics by Tom Duncan, Heather Kennett and John Murray.
    You mighta known all that, but I can't find a list of topics, sorry!


    Also, does anyone know if section 3 is weighted the same as sections 1 and 2? I know it's marked out of 15 instead of 9, but do they make sure it's all equal or give it a bigger weighting? Thanks. And where are these week 4 and 5 questions coming from?
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    (Original post by Calumcalum)
    I'm just reading my GCSE revision guides, I mean this book says double award GCSE without the earth and beyond, and seismic waves. CGP guides got me through GCSE physics fine anbd this BMAT book recommends GCSE Physics by Tom Duncan, Heather Kennett and John Murray.
    You mighta known all that, but I can't find a list of topics, sorry!


    Also, does anyone know if section 3 is weighted the same as sections 1 and 2? I know it's marked out of 15 instead of 9, but do they make sure it's all equal or give it a bigger weighting? Thanks. And where are these week 4 and 5 questions coming from?

    its obviously given greater weighting as its out of 15 its just under 50% of the test.
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    Well here is my go, first bit of real BMAT practice.

    Spoiler:
    Show

    Actively involving a patient in their treatment means giving them an understanding of the treatment to be given and why it has been chosent over alternatives and to allow them to choose alternatives if they wish.
    It may be argued that patients should be actively involved as not involving them could break the crucial trust between patient and doctor; if a patient doesnt know how their doctor treating them and why it is difficult for them to trust them. If a patient cannot trust their doctor they may not take prescribed medication as directed which could be of detriment to their health and impare treament.
    Another reason they should be invoveled actively is you cannot ethically justify not, you are treating them so not allowing them a say in their own treatment would be to disempower them from control over themselves, aspects of their treatment may be against theire beliefs, eg. Jehovahs witnesses againt blood transfusions forcing such treament upon them would be ethically wrong.
    However, it is possible that not involving a patient could be justified in some circumstances for example someone with dementia whose advocate does not wish them to know of certain treamtents as it would cause unessary stress to the individual who is in no codition to make an informed decision about their treament.
    Another situation this could be justifeid would be the prescription of homepathic remedies for placebo purposes, tellign someone they are effectively taking water will reduce the placebo effect and so slow healing.
    In conclusion in the majority of cases it is important to involve patients actively in their treatment except in certian situations.


    An comments/advice would be appreciated
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    Great question, would you mind if I joined in with weekly questions?
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    (Original post by jazwalker)
    Great question, would you mind if I joined in with weekly questions?

    sure, you mean doing the questions are making questions?
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    I meant doing them, as I'm presently preparing, same as everyone else (you seem to be doing a wonderful job of procuring controversial quotes for BMAT).

    I've got essays for this week's and last week's, which was a little more challenging (after all, how can you argue that contraceptives don't destroy the potential of life? that's what they're sposed to do!)

    this week's:
    This statement implies that the role of a patient, in making their own decisions as to treatment, plays a small part in the overall well-being of that patient. This was a commonly held view of the 1900s and disregarded a patient’s right to autonomy, as well as giving patients little control over their future.
    Primarily, the importance of a strong working relationship between physician and patient, is that a physician is working to increase the patient’s quality of life. This is the reason that informed consent is always required in Medicine – physicians are liable to act against the patient’s best interests, especially in the interests of science, or of utilitarianism. This active co-operation ensures not only a transparency and increased trust between patient and doctor, but also decreases the chance of an abuse of trust.
    Secondly, each case being individual and people’s ethics being different, patients’ feelings towards different treatments may vary greatly, making two seemingly identical cases have different ‘best options’. For example, in the case of a terminal cancer, some people may choose to aggressively treat the cancer, to procure a few extra months, whereas another may prefer to die peacefully and at home. Especially concerning extraordinary care and treatments with risk factors attached, different people have widely varying opinions.
    However, a conflict arises where a patient is not considered suitable to provide informed consent, or to understand the different options. For example, children may be deemed too young to understand the possibilities, or even conceptualise death. Mentally disabled people may again be considered incapable of making a sound judgement, especially in cases of schizophrenia or severe depression. Then, it is important that the decisions made for them are made by an independent person, especially if the treatment decided upon, may potentially not be in the patient’s benefit(e.g. a treatment with high risk). In this way, we may try to procure a decision as close as possible to being in line with the patient’s best interests, which is the crux of contemporary medical treatment.


    Last week's:
    Pope Paul is suggesting that, by preventing conception, contraception is not tantamount to homicide, but carries the same inherent sin, in preventing procreation. As life is considered to start at conception, this stance implies that contraception is wrong for different reasons as post-conception issues such as abortion, but still contravenes the right to life, of the potential fetus.
    Although it is undeniable that contraception prevents lives from beginning, the implication that this is wrong, must be carefully studied, as it places the right to life of a conceptual human, before the rights of the parents, in particular the mother, to their own life-choices and also to protection from STIs.
    Further, in implying that procreation is a deontological virtue, Pope Paul VI is condemning not only ‘scientific’ methods such as contraception and abortion, but also abstinence. If indeed, lack of procreation is a sin, it seems that the celibacy practiced by priests is somewhat counterproductive.
    Then, the only objection that it seems the Church has to contraception, is that it allows ‘irresponsible’ intercourse and promiscuity. Considering that the consequences of unwanted births are most heavily visited upon by the newborn, this seems an unethical approach to punishment and and disregards the duality of Christianity, in that sins are punished on a metaphysical plane.
    Then, contraception is a great step for not only health as regards STI, but also towards choice and family planning – although there are issues regarding efficacy and side-effects (for example, breast cancer with an oestragen pill). However, the great range of contraceptive methods allows that appropriate contraception is available for anyone who wants it. Indeed, the Scandinavian countries have made it policy to establish oral contraception in teenage girls, which has played an important part in decreasing the number of teen pregnancies and therefore allowing a higher standard of family planning.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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    (Original post by jazwalker)
    I meant doing them, as I'm presently preparing, same as everyone else (you seem to be doing a wonderful job of procuring controversial quotes for BMAT).

    I've got essays for this week's and last week's, which was a little more challenging (after all, how can you argue that contraceptives don't destroy the potential of life? that's what they're sposed to do!)

    this week's:
    This statement implies that the role of a patient, in making their own decisions as to treatment, plays a small part in the overall well-being of that patient. This was a commonly held view of the 1900s and disregarded a patient’s right to autonomy, as well as giving patients little control over their future.
    Primarily, the importance of a strong working relationship between physician and patient, is that a physician is working to increase the patient’s quality of life. This is the reason that informed consent is always required in Medicine – physicians are liable to act against the patient’s best interests, especially in the interests of science, or of utilitarianism. This active co-operation ensures not only a transparency and increased trust between patient and doctor, but also decreases the chance of an abuse of trust.
    Secondly, each case being individual and people’s ethics being different, patients’ feelings towards different treatments may vary greatly, making two seemingly identical cases have different ‘best options’. For example, in the case of a terminal cancer, some people may choose to aggressively treat the cancer, to procure a few extra months, whereas another may prefer to die peacefully and at home. Especially concerning extraordinary care and treatments with risk factors attached, different people have widely varying opinions.
    However, a conflict arises where a patient is not considered suitable to provide informed consent, or to understand the different options. For example, children may be deemed too young to understand the possibilities, or even conceptualise death. Mentally disabled people may again be considered incapable of making a sound judgement, especially in cases of schizophrenia or severe depression. Then, it is important that the decisions made for them are made by an independent person, especially if the treatment decided upon, may potentially not be in the patient’s benefit(e.g. a treatment with high risk). In this way, we may try to procure a decision as close as possible to being in line with the patient’s best interests, which is the crux of contemporary medical treatment.


    Last week's:
    Pope Paul is suggesting that, by preventing conception, contraception is not tantamount to homicide, but carries the same inherent sin, in preventing procreation. As life is considered to start at conception, this stance implies that contraception is wrong for different reasons as post-conception issues such as abortion, but still contravenes the right to life, of the potential fetus.
    Although it is undeniable that contraception prevents lives from beginning, the implication that this is wrong, must be carefully studied, as it places the right to life of a conceptual human, before the rights of the parents, in particular the mother, to their own life-choices and also to protection from STIs.
    Further, in implying that procreation is a deontological virtue, Pope Paul VI is condemning not only ‘scientific’ methods such as contraception and abortion, but also abstinence. If indeed, lack of procreation is a sin, it seems that the celibacy practiced by priests is somewhat counterproductive.
    Then, the only objection that it seems the Church has to contraception, is that it allows ‘irresponsible’ intercourse and promiscuity. Considering that the consequences of unwanted births are most heavily visited upon by the newborn, this seems an unethical approach to punishment and and disregards the duality of Christianity, in that sins are punished on a metaphysical plane.
    Then, contraception is a great step for not only health as regards STI, but also towards choice and family planning – although there are issues regarding efficacy and side-effects (for example, breast cancer with an oestragen pill). However, the great range of contraceptive methods allows that appropriate contraception is available for anyone who wants it. Indeed, the Scandinavian countries have made it policy to establish oral contraception in teenage girls, which has played an important part in decreasing the number of teen pregnancies and therefore allowing a higher standard of family planning.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    you dont need any help at all!

    they are both equally good. and score 10 or above in my opinion.

    How yould you rate my one 4 last weeks question?
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    (Original post by jjkkll)
    you dont need any help at all!

    they are both equally good. and score 10 or above in my opinion.

    How yould you rate my one 4 last weeks question?
    Could you have a look at mine an see what you think (spoilered in previous post)
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Could you have a look at mine an see what you think (spoilered in previous post)

    its good also 9ish i would say!

    but i would NEVER end a BMAT essay with "in conclusion".
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    (Original post by jjkkll)
    its good also 9ish i would say!

    but i would NEVER end a BMAT essay with "in conclusion".
    Fair point about in conclusion.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Fair point about in conclusion.

    mine?
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    (Original post by jjkkll)
    mine?
    yes, I realy need to brush up essay writing
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    I think it is fine to say 'in conclusion'.
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    (Original post by jjkkll)
    This is my Week 5 Answer:

    "The Catholic Church believes that contraceptive techniques destroy the potential of life, as the purpose of contraceptives is to prevent pregnancy. They prevent pregnancy by stopping fertilisation and/or implantation, which to the Catholic Church is the equivalent of murder.

    Contraceptive techniques do not always destroy the potential of like, for instance is the environment the child will be born into is not able to support the life then the potential has already been destroyed. The example above is caused by many circumstances there are cased where the mother is not ready for the child and would be unable to look after it properly, or where the parents are substance users and would neglect the child and possibly leave the child to die. In situations like these contraceptives should be used. The Catholic Church has the view that the sole purpose of sexual intercourse is to reproduce to form life. However, in the 21st century societies views toward sex have changed and it is done as a pleasurable activity rather than just for reproductive purposes. In these cases the child would be born into the world unwanted by both of its parents and thus defeating the objective of reproduction, which is to produce and nurture new life.

    The use of contraceptive techniques should be accepted in certain circumstances and at the mothers’ discretion. The Catholic Church is unlikely to change their view but this view should still be respected today"
    jjkkll, I particularly liked the idea that 'life' is inclusive of clinical life and of a holistic interpretation of life. In addition, I like how you've brought out a conflict of ethics, in how someone might not have a decent quality of life - however, you may come close to begging the question of, is a life as an adopted child, worthless? Obviously, no, but they do have a higher chance of being neglected (I'm just trying to find some statistics, i think 7x more likely to be abused).
    I think it might be worth looking at some more paragraphing aswell - your points could be summarised as:
    -definition
    -contraception is important for the sake of the unborn child. (However, there is then the issue of is any life better than none at all?)
    -contraception is important to the parent's rights
    -there is a lot of development in society's view of intercourse - it has more purpose than procreation
    -conclusion: the church has a view that is unlikely to change.

    making these into seperate paragraphs would probably improve the clairty of essay, but the points themselves are well-argued and concise.

    I hope that helps?
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    yes, I realy need to brush up essay writing

    LOL i meant what do you think of my Contraception essay lol
 
 
 
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