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    (Original post by Chumbaniya)
    Britain has the horrible, horrible culture where intelligence is seemingly distrusted and those who are very successful academically are not given half the reverence that people who are famous for sports or for nothing at all are. Besides, the ignorant enjoy being so, and they wouldn't want to be intelligent. They'd only ever like the possibility of financial gain from a good career that came with it.
    Distrusted is an emphatic word though, don't you think?
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    (Original post by Chumbaniya)
    I definitely think looks are envied more. Britain has the horrible, horrible culture where intelligence is seemingly distrusted and those who are very successful academically are not given half the reverence that people who are famous for sports or for nothing at all are. Besides, the ignorant enjoy being so, and they wouldn't want to be intelligent. They'd only ever like the possibility of financial gain from a good career that came with it.
    Sadly, this is true. A large amount of people look up to cultural and sporting celebrities, rather than academics. Ignorance is the only way some people can cope with the world, and their own mediocrity. Though it depends on the person.

    I personally don't envy sportsmanship or good looks. I admire intelligence, but I wouldn't say I envy someone who's "smarter" than me in some way. I just look up to them.
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    OP: those insults are for people who do well academically. they are not necessarily aimed at people who are intelligent though.

    are you really intelligent if you spend all of your time, which others spend on hobbies or fun, memorising lists of enzyme names, which you then recite off in some exam? probably not. this merely proves a base level of intelligence, concentration and, perhaps, a need to compensate for something.

    i honestly don't think that the people in my classes who do better than me are more intelligent: i am aware of the time i waste, or spend on a hobby, or something else, and of the fact that they spend this time studying. when i speak to them after test results, i expect they will be pretty knowledgeable (sp?) about everything, have a close to photographic memory, be very quick at maths calculations, be able to speak lots of languages, have read loads of books, play 4 instruments to a high standard and just generally be impressive. i am always let down, and then begin to realise that they are very boring, worked very hard, and spend their "free" time working for tests which, in the grand scheme of things, are quite meaningless. these exam nazis then place undue importance on their studies, thinking everyone will be very interested in what they're going to do, as if they're some sort of einstein-genius, and their exam results mean they'll do amazing work with their lives.

    perhaps that's why people get insults: because they work constantly for these tests which, they feel, prove some incredible superiority which they evidently don't have over others.

    i knew a boy in my old school who had asperger's and lots of other problems. he was very quiet, and always beat everyone in tests. he could speak foreign languages, had a close to photographic memory, was already doing his proper exams which most do towards the end of school (we were young), read a lot, knew a lot about most topics if you asked him, and was just generally very intelligent. it was clear he didn't work too much: he didn't take school too seriously, he'd never shove his results in your face, he was ok. he never got called "nerd" or "swot". people respected him: he was clearly talented.

    my point is, uninteresting exam nazis aren't bullied for "intelligence", they're, in my experience, usually bullied for their boring personalities, and narrow minded views on others, based on their exam results.

    sorry if i've offended, just thought i'd contribute a thought: people, in my experience, respect intelligence, and if you get good results with it and that's clear, fair enough. they don't however, i've noticed, respect people who compensate for their shortcomings by gaining "better" letters in meaningless tests. what annoys them, i think, is blatantly average people just like them, who get more respect (perhaps from teachers) because they have forced themselves to give up large chunks of life to exams.

    sorry about length of post. just a thought, which i had not yet seen here.
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    (Original post by asdfghjkl123456789)
    OP: those insults are for people who do well academically. they are not necessarily aimed at people who are intelligent though.

    are you really intelligent if you spend all of your time, which others spend on hobbies or fun, memorising lists of enzyme names, which you then recite off in some exam? probably not. this merely proves a base level of intelligence, concentration and, perhaps, a need to compensate for something.

    i honestly don't think that the people in my classes who do better than me are more intelligent: i am aware of the time i waste, or spend on a hobby, or something else, and of the fact that they spend this time studying. when i speak to them after test results, i expect they will be pretty knowledgeable (sp?) about everything, have a close to photographic memory, be very quick at maths calculations, be able to speak lots of languages, have read loads of books, play 4 instruments to a high standard and just generally be impressive. i am always let down, and then begin to realise that they are very boring, worked very hard, and spend their "free" time working for tests which, in the grand scheme of things, are quite meaningless. these exam nazis then place undue importance on their studies, thinking everyone will be very interested in what they're going to do, as if they're some sort of einstein-genius, and their exam results mean they'll do amazing work with their lives.

    perhaps that's why people get insults: because they work constantly for these tests which, they feel, prove some incredible superiority which they evidently don't have over others.

    i knew a boy in my old school who had asperger's and lots of other problems. he was very quiet, and always beat everyone in tests. he could speak foreign languages, had a close to photographic memory, was already doing his proper exams which most do towards the end of school (we were young), read a lot, knew a lot about most topics if you asked him, and was just generally very intelligent. it was clear he didn't work too much: he didn't take school too seriously, he'd never shove his results in your face, he was ok. he never got called "nerd" or "swot". people respected him: he was clearly talented.

    my point is, uninteresting exam nazis aren't bullied for "intelligence", they're, in my experience, usually bullied for their boring personalities, and narrow minded views on others, based on their exam results.

    sorry if i've offended, just thought i'd contribute a thought: people, in my experience, respect intelligence, and if you get good results with it and that's clear, fair enough. they don't however, i've noticed, respect people who compensate for their shortcomings by gaining "better" letters in meaningless tests. what annoys them, i think, is blatantly average people just like them, who get more respect (perhaps from teachers) because they have forced themselves to give up large chunks of life to exams.

    sorry about length of post. just a thought, which i had not yet seen here.
    Great post, I think :p:

    Person A and Person B are both of equal levels of "intelligence". Person A studies and does well in exams, Person B slacks off and performs terribly in school. Who's the fool, in the long term?
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    sorry shask, i'm not trying to be rude, but i'm slightly confused
    are you agreeing with me, do you not get my point, or are you disagreeing?

    if your point is that the slacker suffers more in the long term, from a worse job, and is therefore less intelligent for making the life choice to slack, i can't agree. the slacker avoids stresses, and everything else. he may still do reasonably in school, but not amazingly, so still get to uni. while he may be slightly less successful academically there, or later on in his job, at least he's probably enjoyed all of his free time more than the work obsessed other guy. therefore, given that we all die at some point, and there probably isn't some afterlife where exam results are significant, the slacker has done better by enjoying his time living. the other guy has wasted his time on meaningless tests. sorry if this was your point anyway, i was unsure. :confused: :confused:

    please clarify your thinking
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    (Original post by jonnyofengland)
    I think the most envied attribute is the one which you don't have. So if you're incredibly sporty, you probably already popular, but might wish you were cleverer. Just an idea.


    As for good looking, a lot of "well groomed" people near me are known as gays. And girls can always be called tarts or whores...

    Can't really think of an insult for being sporty, but then people who are good at sports never get abuse from anybody really.
    Meathead? Jocks? Slow?
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    (Original post by sarforaz)
    Meathead? Jocks? Slow?
    An english one?
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    I think Pimping is the most envied attribute. I mean I get guys on here negging me all the time for my skills with the shawties. So Pimping is definitely up there :yep:
 
 
 
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