GCSE AQA English Literature Paper 1 and 2 Revision and Study Chat Watch

iamsic
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(Original post by Elzbth-.-.-G15)
I'm doing the exact same. Which is the worst for u? I'm struggling a little with a Christmas carol but only cuz i find it harder to remember quotes from prose rather than a play where I can imagine all the characters speaking their lines.
To be honest, I find A.C.C. the easiest, because that's the one I've known for the longest. I've grown up with that story, and some quotes from the books do come up.

Inspector Calls, I find okay for the same reason, and because so much drama happens.

Romeo and Juliet's next, as I love the storyline and thats fresh in my head, bc I read it a lot.

The hardest for me is Power and Conflict, bc I struggle with writing comparisons.
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PizzaMan2989
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Does someone mind looking at my Macbeth essay on 'explaining the role of the supernatural in the play' and giving it a mark? Thanks - Davy611

In Shakespeare's Jacobean tragedy Macbeth, the theme of the supernatural is explored by different characters to demonstrate the source of power it holds - possibly criticising the patriarchal society of the time as it goes against traditional perspectives on gender roles and equality. It is used to present the reality of Macbeth's hamartia, further drawing on the conventions of a Shakespearean tragedy.

Shakespeare employs the theme of the supernatural to give the character of Lady Macbeth a sense of power she would otherwise not have in the highly patriarchal society of the time. This can be seen when she commands the “murdering ministers' ' to “come to my woman's breasts and take her (my) milk for gall”. The use of the imperative, `come”, shows the authority that Lady Macbeth believes to have over supernatural spirits as she commands them to fill her with poison. Furthermore, the lexical use of the noun “ministers'' which could first be thought of the ministers of the church presents them as ones that coordinate church services, under the authority of God, however, more perceptive readers could understand the ministers as being spirits that work under the authority of Lady Macbeth. Perhaps the wish to strip herself of all attributes that accredit her feminine nature is Shakespeare critcising the society at the time, where members of his audience would have forced the impression that all women are weak and feeble. This emphasises Shakespeare's motive for equal gender roles within society and this is reflected in his relationship with Anne Hathaway, in which he clearly respected her as a mature woman of 26 years whilst he was only 18. This is developed in the relationship between Lady Macbeth and her husband and it becomes clear that the only reason for Lady Macbeth's manipulative and conniving attitude, which ultimately led to the subsequent persuasion of Macbeth to commit regicide, was as a result of her wanting to have a voice in things. She understood the lack of reasoning Macbeth had to kill Duncan when he described himself as “having no spur” to explore his “vaulting ambition”, and she exploited this fatal flaw of his. Most of the highly Christian, contemporary audience might imagine that the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth parallels Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden. This is supported by the fact that Eve was tempted to try the fruit from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil by the devil which led to her tempting Adam. Both led to the hamartia of the characters and Shakespeare may have done this to illustrate how women denied equality turn to supernatural heresies to satisfy themselves - ultimately showing the need for change within society.

Shakespeare also uses the supernatural to explore the reality of Macbeth's fatal flaw and the effects it has on him. He suggests that his hamartia is a result of his pre-existing ambition to become king. This is especially evident in Act two, Scene one when Macbeth questions “Is this a dagger I see before me?”. The use of rhetorical questions by Shakespeare reflects Macbeth's paranoid and conflicting state of mind as he questions his original motives for killing Duncan. Shakespeare reinforces the theme of appearance versus reality as Macbeth is unable to distinguish the difference between fantasy and the realms of reality and one could infer this as being a hallucination of what he wishes to see. This is reinforced with the imperative “come” that follows, as he urges it to let him “clutch thee”(the dagger). The idea that the dagger represents the will for Macbeth to become king shows the effects of meddling with the supernatural as it destabalises his integrity as the eponymous character of the novel. It could be argued that the prophecies from the witches, gave Macbeth a reason to go ahead and kill Duncan. Most readers would feel sympathetic for Macbeth because he still considers his options, having a sense of moral virtue, but the fact that this idea is introduced so early on suggests that his ambition had formed a plan that had been in the back of his mind for a long time. It is possible that Shakespeare wrote the play to satisfy the supernatural beliefs of King James and this is evident in the second interpretation of the dagger. Perhaps the dagger is not a “false creation” but in fact, the witches put objects in front of him to derange Macbeth of his rational thinking. This evokes a feeling of fear in most members of the audience as they had strong beliefs in the supernatural and witchcraft. King James, in particular, despised all practices of witchcraft, going as far as to punish anyone even suspected of it. Moreover, the line “mine eyes are made the fools of the other senses” foreshadows the further descent as a tragic hero, where the personal pronoun in “my eyes” emphasises the ambition of Macbeth to be the real problem, not the witches or lady Macbeth.

Shakespeare also establishes the theme of the supernatural at the beginning of the play and further emphasises it throughout the play to continuously foreshadow events and create a tense and dramatic environment. At the beginning of the play the witches are introduced with the stage directions of “Thunder and lighting”. The use of pathetic fallacy to portray the harsh and undesirable weather conditions draws upon contemporary beliefs of the supernatural at the time. It was thought that witches were able to control the weather and as a result of them entering this disastrous environment, it would make their presence even more frightening and believable. Now whenever there is an element of weather in the scene, the audience will be awaiting anticipation of the arrival of the witches, posing the arrival of them without supernatural control over it as even more frightening. Tension is further built when the witches speak in unison in “fair is foul, and foul is fair ''. The use of the oxymoronic device and equivocation here emphasises the witch's desire to blur the lines between good and bad. Shakespeare further adumbrated the other theme of appearance versus reality as their true malicious intents are hidden in their ambiguous language. Perhaps the witches speaking in unison reflects how the character of Macbeth, who as previously mentioned, is more involved with the witches' thoughts, than we may have originally believed to be true. It is clear, however, that this idea is not what Shakespeare actually believes in as opposed to King James who outlined his beliefs in his book titled Demonology. Shakespeare in juxtaposing thought, was against the idea of witches and witchcraft and the use of them was purely to satisfy King James and his audiences. One might imagine that this is reflected in the use of trochaic tetrameter and rhyming couplets by the witches. This unusual use of this as compared to Iambic pentameter, which mimics the beat of the heart, creates a somewhat childish, nursery rhyme feel. Perhaps this is Shakespeare's way of outlining his stance on the effects of witchcraft, where he doesn't believe it to have an actual effect on the fate of Macbeth and other characters and events which take place in the play.
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ygibxo
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(Original post by Khnz)
Anyone doing blood brothers, Romeo and Juliet or a Christmas carol.
I’m doing Romeo and Juliet, A Christmas Carol and An Inspector Calls
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Davy611
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(Original post by PizzaMan2989)
Does someone mind looking at my Macbeth essay on 'explaining the role of the supernatural in the play' and giving it a mark? Thanks - Davy611

In Shakespeare's Jacobean tragedy Macbeth, the theme of the supernatural is explored by different characters to demonstrate the source of power it holds - possibly criticising the patriarchal society of the time as it goes against traditional perspectives on gender roles and equality. It is used to present the reality of Macbeth's hamartia, further drawing on the conventions of a Shakespearean tragedy.

Shakespeare employs the theme of the supernatural to give the character of Lady Macbeth a sense of power she would otherwise not have in the highly patriarchal society of the time. This can be seen when she commands the “murdering ministers' ' to “come to my woman's breasts and take her (my) milk for gall”. The use of the imperative, `come”, shows the authority that Lady Macbeth believes to have over supernatural spirits as she commands them to fill her with poison. Furthermore, the lexical use of the noun “ministers'' which could first be thought of the ministers of the church presents them as ones that coordinate church services, under the authority of God, however, more perceptive readers could understand the ministers as being spirits that work under the authority of Lady Macbeth. Perhaps the wish to strip herself of all attributes that accredit her feminine nature is Shakespeare critcising the society at the time, where members of his audience would have forced the impression that all women are weak and feeble. This emphasises Shakespeare's motive for equal gender roles within society and this is reflected in his relationship with Anne Hathaway, in which he clearly respected her as a mature woman of 26 years whilst he was only 18. This is developed in the relationship between Lady Macbeth and her husband and it becomes clear that the only reason for Lady Macbeth's manipulative and conniving attitude, which ultimately led to the subsequent persuasion of Macbeth to commit regicide, was as a result of her wanting to have a voice in things. She understood the lack of reasoning Macbeth had to kill Duncan when he described himself as “having no spur” to explore his “vaulting ambition”, and she exploited this fatal flaw of his. Most of the highly Christian, contemporary audience might imagine that the relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth parallels Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden. This is supported by the fact that Eve was tempted to try the fruit from the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil by the devil which led to her tempting Adam. Both led to the hamartia of the characters and Shakespeare may have done this to illustrate how women denied equality turn to supernatural heresies to satisfy themselves - ultimately showing the need for change within society.

Shakespeare also uses the supernatural to explore the reality of Macbeth's fatal flaw and the effects it has on him. He suggests that his hamartia is a result of his pre-existing ambition to become king. This is especially evident in Act two, Scene one when Macbeth questions “Is this a dagger I see before me?”. The use of rhetorical questions by Shakespeare reflects Macbeth's paranoid and conflicting state of mind as he questions his original motives for killing Duncan. Shakespeare reinforces the theme of appearance versus reality as Macbeth is unable to distinguish the difference between fantasy and the realms of reality and one could infer this as being a hallucination of what he wishes to see. This is reinforced with the imperative “come” that follows, as he urges it to let him “clutch thee”(the dagger). The idea that the dagger represents the will for Macbeth to become king shows the effects of meddling with the supernatural as it destabalises his integrity as the eponymous character of the novel. It could be argued that the prophecies from the witches, gave Macbeth a reason to go ahead and kill Duncan. Most readers would feel sympathetic for Macbeth because he still considers his options, having a sense of moral virtue, but the fact that this idea is introduced so early on suggests that his ambition had formed a plan that had been in the back of his mind for a long time. It is possible that Shakespeare wrote the play to satisfy the supernatural beliefs of King James and this is evident in the second interpretation of the dagger. Perhaps the dagger is not a “false creation” but in fact, the witches put objects in front of him to derange Macbeth of his rational thinking. This evokes a feeling of fear in most members of the audience as they had strong beliefs in the supernatural and witchcraft. King James, in particular, despised all practices of witchcraft, going as far as to punish anyone even suspected of it. Moreover, the line “mine eyes are made the fools of the other senses” foreshadows the further descent as a tragic hero, where the personal pronoun in “my eyes” emphasises the ambition of Macbeth to be the real problem, not the witches or lady Macbeth.

Shakespeare also establishes the theme of the supernatural at the beginning of the play and further emphasises it throughout the play to continuously foreshadow events and create a tense and dramatic environment. At the beginning of the play the witches are introduced with the stage directions of “Thunder and lighting”. The use of pathetic fallacy to portray the harsh and undesirable weather conditions draws upon contemporary beliefs of the supernatural at the time. It was thought that witches were able to control the weather and as a result of them entering this disastrous environment, it would make their presence even more frightening and believable. Now whenever there is an element of weather in the scene, the audience will be awaiting anticipation of the arrival of the witches, posing the arrival of them without supernatural control over it as even more frightening. Tension is further built when the witches speak in unison in “fair is foul, and foul is fair ''. The use of the oxymoronic device and equivocation here emphasises the witch's desire to blur the lines between good and bad. Shakespeare further adumbrated the other theme of appearance versus reality as their true malicious intents are hidden in their ambiguous language. Perhaps the witches speaking in unison reflects how the character of Macbeth, who as previously mentioned, is more involved with the witches' thoughts, than we may have originally believed to be true. It is clear, however, that this idea is not what Shakespeare actually believes in as opposed to King James who outlined his beliefs in his book titled Demonology. Shakespeare in juxtaposing thought, was against the idea of witches and witchcraft and the use of them was purely to satisfy King James and his audiences. One might imagine that this is reflected in the use of trochaic tetrameter and rhyming couplets by the witches. This unusual use of this as compared to Iambic pentameter, which mimics the beat of the heart, creates a somewhat childish, nursery rhyme feel. Perhaps this is Shakespeare's way of outlining his stance on the effects of witchcraft, where he doesn't believe it to have an actual effect on the fate of Macbeth and other characters and events which take place in the play.
Yes, this is quite a good essay. If you could rattle off this quality under pressure in an exam situation then I'd expect you to be around grade 7. Try and avoid contextually vague comments. I quite like your hypothesis about Shakespeare's scorn for witches but the Adam and Eve comments don't seem that credible to me. The 'weakness ' of the Jacobean woman is a common GCSE assertion but I find it a bit shallow. Can you be a bit more insightful? The technical analysis is fine and you obviously know the play. You do display critical style. Don't be too wordy; the examiner won't appreciate it. Do use a semi colon before 'however ' as a transitional phrase with a comma after it. The examiner will appreciate that. Good effort.
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Isabelpayne200
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(Original post by moonchilz)
get a blank text of the books and analyse them using genius. it's the best way to revise! and after u analysed one act/stave or even small scenes, make quote banks for character and themes. it really helps!
What’s a quote bank? How can I make one? If you have a picture that’d be great
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Davy611
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Pretty sure a quote bank will just be a few quotations for character and theme to remember.
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PizzaMan2989
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(Original post by Davy611)
Yes, this is quite a good essay. If you could rattle off this quality under pressure in an exam situation then I'd expect you to be around grade 7. Try and avoid contextually vague comments. I quite like your hypothesis about Shakespeare's scorn for witches but the Adam and Eve comments don't seem that credible to me. The 'weakness ' of the Jacobean woman is a common GCSE assertion but I find it a bit shallow. Can you be a bit more insightful? The technical analysis is fine and you obviously know the play. You do display critical style. Don't be too wordy; the examiner won't appreciate it. Do use a semi colon before 'however ' as a transitional phrase with a comma after it. The examiner will appreciate that. Good effort.
Thank you, the feedback is much appreciated. Do you have any ideas on how I could develop my analysis on the weakness of Jacobean women?
And also you think I should leave out the idea of Adam and Eve, right?
Thanks
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Davy611
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Yes, leave out Adam and Eve. Or, if you're keen on the allusion, a line like 'There are potential parallels to the Book of Genesis'. It's just about sophistication of expression. Imagine an examiner reading the essay. They'll want to reward insight and perception. Every essay from grade 3 upwards will make a simple point about gender roles. Do a bit more reading and learn more about the complexities. The Time Traveller's Guide to Elizabethan England is an interesting read:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Time-Travel.../dp/0099542072
Last edited by Davy611; 2 weeks ago
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moonchilz
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(Original post by Isabelpayne200)
What’s a quote bank? How can I make one? If you have a picture that’d be great
it is basically a table with three sections. the first column will have who said the quote, where and page for reference. the second column will have the quote itself. the third column will have the analysis for the quote. they really help me a lot and here's the screenshot of something i have done.
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RoisinTewkesbury
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(Original post by elandra)
Doing A Christmas Carol, but not the other two. I’ve got Macbeth and An Inspector Calls. Very generic.
I'm doing the same! Are you doing Power and Conflict poetry as well?
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Isabelpayne200
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(Original post by moonchilz)
it is basically a table with three sections. the first column will have who said the quote, where and page for reference. the second column will have the quote itself. the third column will have the analysis for the quote. they really help me a lot and here's the screenshot of something i have done.
Great, thank you!
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schmicken123
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Can you please tell me what questions came up in the 2019 English lit paper for inspector calls?

Thanks
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Lilymay123
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I’m doing blood brothers
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clydep
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(Original post by jayydah)
im sorry but can someone explain how i can improve my analysis of poems and the books? my teacher says my ideas are high levelled ideas but i don't write it down that well. also 've only doen like 7 poems is that bad?
i know a lot about decasyllabic quatrains and ballad meter, iambic trimeter and prose and shakespeare's use of blank verse and modern slavery - these techniques provide a very congenial view on societal issues. the poets really interest me and i love exploring context, i wish our school was doing the love poetry section because i feel that. unreciprocated love ami right?
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adeye
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hey, can someone try to mark my english lit essay i did for homework
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...it?usp=sharing
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jamiehussain
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(Original post by Khnz)
Anyone doing blood brothers, Romeo and Juliet or a Christmas carol.
Yep! doing all them
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noortahir_Yr10
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I'm doing A Christmas Carol, Macbeth, An Inspector Calls and Power and Conflict. Would really appreciate it if someone could tell me what Power and Conflict poem came up for the GCSE 2019 English Lit Paper 2. Thanks x
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ravenn21
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(Original post by noortahir_Yr10)
I'm doing A Christmas Carol, Macbeth, An Inspector Calls and Power and Conflict. Would really appreciate it if someone could tell me what Power and Conflict poem came up for the GCSE 2019 English Lit Paper 2. Thanks x
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RaA64
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I have wrote an essay on the following question. The extract is taken from the chapter "Search for Mr. Hyde" (page 12). Could anyone mark it out of 30 (AQA) and please give it a mark? (I think I spelt pursuing wrong as well so ignore that xD)

How does Stevenson present suspense and tension (mystery and fear) in this extract and throughout the novel. (30 marks)

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is a late-Victorian 19th century gothic novel, partly written using an epistolary format, using first-hand letters to make the unbelievable events of the novel believable. Suspense and tension is something that is presented throughout the novel through the use of a third-person omniscient narration, which is a reflection of the time period, when people were worried about Queen Victoria dying and the changes that would occur as a result of this, so it can also be seen as a fin de siècle novella. Suspense and tension relates the events of the novel and the mystery of Hyde, “that man is not truly one but truly two”.

Stevenson creates suspense and tension in the novel by employing pathetic fallacy in this extract. Mr Utterson is out “at night” walking under the “fogged city moon”. This reflects the dark nature of Hyde, who Utterson is pursuing, and that the fog is obscuring everything on the “street”. However, an alternative interpretation could be that the darkness could portray and foreshadow the dark events that will occur later on in the novel. This is reflected in the whole novel because Hyde commits dark and dangerous acts throughout the novel in darkness, another example of pathetic fallacy, such as when he “trampled” over a “girl” of the age of “maybe eight or ten”. This adds to the suspense and tension because of the “hellish” acts Hyde commits, because the reader doesn’t know what the “juggernaut” and “man” will do next. This is because this is a fear of science novel when Victorians were afraid of the power of science and the idea that it can change a cultured man of “genial respectability” like Jekyll into a “troglodyte” like Hyde. Therefore, the duality of man and hidden nature of Hyde creates suspense and mystery which is demonstrated both in the extract and throughout this novel.

Suspense and tension is created through Stevenson’s use of Mr Utterson as a third-person omniscient narrator. The reader identifies with Utterson and learns things about the mystery as Utterson does, which creates suspense through the use of letters and the epistolary format, as everything sounds like a confession. In the extract, it is clear that Utterson is pursing Hyde and attempting to solve the mystery. The fact that Utterson is pursuing Hyde “at all hours of solitude” demonstrates Utterson’s persistent nature in attempting to uncover the truth of the mystery and reality of Hyde. Utterson’s persistent nature is demonstrated by Stevenson’s use of the pun “if he be Mr. Hyde, I shall be Mr. Seek”. This suggests that Utterson and Hyde are presented as opposites in this extract – his nemesis, which is why Utterson is “digging at the problem” and his attention “sharply and decisively arrested”, and this creates suspense and tension as Utterson is an unreliable narrator and always reaches the wrong conclusions. This notion is reinforced in various parts of the novel, such as when Utterson reaches the wrong conclusion about Hyde, under the impression that Hyde is blackmailing Jekyll over something that occurred “years after memory”. This creates suspense and tension because it’s a gothic convention – the past resurfacing in the future, which Utterson believes. However, an alternative interpretation could be that lots of tension builds up throughout the novel, the reader finds out the truth at the end of the novel. Therefore, Utterson pursing Hyde in this extract and throughout the novel consolidates this mystery as the reader and Utterson attempt to uncover the truth behind Hyde.

The atmosphere Stevenson forms whilst Utterson is trying to solve this mystery creates suspense and tension in this extract. There is “frost in the air” during a “fine dry night”. It is very still as nothing is happening and the reader is waiting for something to happen. This builds up suspense, which is increased by the fact Jekyll is waiting. It also takes a long time for the “odd, light footstep” to reach Utterson. The reader can infer from this that Utterson does this deliberately to build up tension whilst he is waiting for this “footstep” to arrive. The term “light” conveys how Hyde is underdeveloped, which could be because “mythical science” doesn’t have the power to create a fully developed human like God can, and “odd” portrays how Hyde is different, reflecting that he is an outsider. However, it could be interpreted to conclude that Utterson can also be classed as an outsider because he doesn’t know when he will find Hyde. Similarly, in the rest of the novel, tension is created through when Utterson is “digging at the problem” and attempting to solve the mystery of Jekyll in other parts of the novel, like when Utterson invites Mr Guest to inspect the “odd, upright hand”. This creates suspense and tension as Utterson is getting closer to solving the mystery through the resemblance of and similarities between both Jekyll’s and Hyde’s handwriting. However, an alternative interpretation could be that the actual suspense and tension is created because of the fact that Utterson is disrupting his regular, “austere” routine through pursuing Hyde. Therefore, not only the duality of Jekyll with his “genial respectability” and “secret pleasures” creates suspense and fear, but also through the duality of this “lawyer”. Utterson chooses to gallivant in the “fine dry night” after Hyde despite his “austere” nature, and therefore, he is allured by the beauty of darkness, and hence his own duality. The further Utterson progresses, the greater the amount of suspense created, which can be compared to Victorian society when many Victorians had a hidden nature. This is also reflected in the novella through the two sides of Jekyll’s house, one of which belonged to a once “celebrated surgeon”, enabling Stevenson to explore and reveal the concept of man’s duality and the hypocritical attitudes that surrounded it in the 19th century.

Stevenson finally creates suspense and tension through the mystery surrounding what Jekyll has done. In this extract, Stevenson’s use of long sentences demonstrates how long Utterson is waiting and that he is always there until he solves the mystery. This is portrayed by “at last”, which portrays how long Utterson has been waiting, increasing the suspense that builds up throughout this extract. He is relentless in his everlasting routine and will doggedly pursue Hyde, even if it disrupts him. However, the reader knows that this will not be the last time Utterson encounters Hyde. The mystery of Hyde doesn’t only create suspense and tension, but this is also what is driving Utterson, and without this drive, he wouldn’t be there to “haunt the door” and at all times, because he will never give up until he knows the true identity of the “small” man. Again, this consolidates the suspense that has built up in the novella until this point. What Utterson doesn’t recognise, however, is that he also doesn’t know the true identity of his “old” and “inseparable” friend Jekyll, who is searching for his true “identity”. Also, throughout the novel, this tension is evident because Stevenson deliberately keeps the reader waiting until the end of the novel. He also keeps Utterson waiting through the “crushing anticipation of calamity” as Utterson is waiting for something bad to happen. Arguably suspense and tension is at its highest surrounding this mystery when the “hearty, healthy, dapper, red-faced” Lanyon sees the “hardly human” Hyde transform into his once “old” mate Jekyll. This transformation creates suspense and tension because Lanyon transforms from “hearty, healthy, dapper, red-faced” to someone who is in “deep-seated terror of mind”, which embodies how shocking this is, not only as this “unscientific balderdash” is such a shock at the time due to the fear of science and that it can create an “animal” like Hyde, but also because Hyde’s true existence is revealed. Lanyon seeing this transformation changes his perception of God, religion and science, resulting in “death”, and thus, this shock is at the height of the tension in the novel.

In conclusion, Stevenson builds up suspense and tension because of the outcomes of the novella’s central theme of “duplicity”. He uses the mystery and fear he manifests in the setting, transforming London into a “nocturnal city”, a dreaded place where Stevenson’s prefiguration of Jack the Ripper is free to “glide more stealthily through sleeping houses”.
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ashpritgcse2020
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Quite lengthy for a response to a question! there are many good bits but some bad bits that you may need to improve on. I dont do your text but i did the exam last year and got an 8 so yeah...

Advantages :
- points at the start of the paragraph are well crafted
- great structural info some is grade 9 if you wrote that in the exam as you have embedded quotations and picked out 'judicious' quotations!
- amazing ideas about the text and the writers purpose (many people don't write about the writers purpose) through structural analysis and good start and ending to the essay!

Disadvantages :
- Near to none use of subject terminology - adjectives metaphors similes (language analysis)
- can be a bit waffly at some points in the essay for example you are almost retelling the story and too many quotes are used and some are not analysed.
- most quotes are not zoomed in on and sometimes the effect on the reader is not given
-structural features get quite repetitive and because there are no points on language analysis, you will lose many marks (most marks are based on language analysis)
- not much context given to support quotes.

In order to improve you could practice by watching videos (also i'm confused, are you aqa or any other exam board cus i have given feedback based on the AQA mark scheme but there is no language analysis which may not be necessary in other exam boards). Mr Salles, Mr Bruff, Stacey Reay are good channels for english)

Out of 30 i would give 3-4 for SPAG and level 3 for analysis (11-15)
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