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    Well there's theories of more advanced civilisations before the Greeks who had a pretty good understanding of mathematics and astronomy, but that goes with the pyramids being built long before they actually were, so perhaps the Greeks didn't formulate these themselves? I don't know how you can prove a winner here...afterall even before Alexander and the Greek power the Persians were more powerful and the Greeks were inspired by the Arabs & Persians. So given that the middle east were more advanced first then you could argue that they contributed more to the Greek discoveries?
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    The Arabs with al-Khwarizmi.
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    (Original post by Method)
    The Arabs with al-Khwarizmi.
    ^ There's some interesting info here.
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    It's the Geeks hands down. They are so good at Maths.
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    (Original post by SusDev)
    It's the Geeks hands down. They are so good at Maths.


    In varying degrees, they both take the credit.

    For example, besides the development of algebra, trigonometry, spherical geometry, and the invention of logarithms; Al-Khwarizmi etcetera, Al-Battani discussed the rotation of the earth on its axis and measured its circumference 500 years before Galileo. His longititudes and lattudes of earth are correct to three decimal places.

    Perhaps one of the most significant advances made by Arabic mathematics began at this time with the work of al-Khwarizmi, namely the beginnings of algebra. It is important to understand just how significant this new idea was. It was a revolutionary move away from the Greek concept of mathematics which was essentially geometry. Source

    Now everyone's heard of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, [made famous by Edward FitzGerald], but did you ever realise Khayyam [d. 1123] was a great mathematician? Solved third and fourth degree equations by intersecting conics ~ the highest algebraic achievement of modern mathematics.

    J M Robertson. "Freethought under Islam", A Short History of Freethought, Ancient and Modern Volume I. (1914).

    Swami Govinda Tirtha, The Nectar of Grace: 'Omar Khayyam's Life and Works (1941).
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    (Original post by urbandervish)


    In varying degrees, they both take the credit.

    For example, besides the development of algebra, trigonometry, spherical geometry, and the invention of logarithms; Al-Khwarizmi etcetera, Al-Battani discussed the rotation of the earth on its axis and measured its circumference 500 years before Galileo. His longititudes and lattudes of earth are correct to three decimal places.

    Perhaps one of the most significant advances made by Arabic mathematics began at this time with the work of al-Khwarizmi, namely the beginnings of algebra. It is important to understand just how significant this new idea was. It was a revolutionary move away from the Greek concept of mathematics which was essentially geometry. Source

    Now everyone's heard of The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, [made famous by Edward FitzGerald], but did you ever realise Khayyam [d. 1123] was a great mathematician? Solved third and fourth degree equations by intersecting conics ~ the highest algebraic achievement of modern mathematics.

    J M Robertson. "Freethought under Islam", A Short History of Freethought, Ancient and Modern Volume I. (1914).

    Swami Govinda Tirtha, The Nectar of Grace: 'Omar Khayyam's Life and Works (1941).
    My comment was suppose to be a joke. But oh well.
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    Both have clearly contributed to Mathematics, however, do the people here recognise also the contribution made by the Indians? For example, Pythagoras Thorem was known in India in the Sulba Sutras before him. The Arabian Numerals orignate from India, with the Arabs calling the numbers Al-Arqan-Al-Hindu, and that mathematics itself was called "the Indian art" (hindisat).

    Then we have the concept of zero with A.L.Basham writing "The mathematical implications of zero (sunya) and infinity, never more than vaguely realized by classical authorities, were fully understood in medieval India. Earlier mathematicians had taught that X/0 = X, but Bhaskara proved the contrary. He also established mathematically what had been recognized in Hindu theology at least a millennium earlier: that infinity, however divided, remains infinite, represented by the equation oo /X = oo."

    Sir William Hunter also proclaimed that India "has even contributed to modern medical science by the discovery of various chemicals and by teaching you how to reform misshapen ears and noses. Even more it has done in mathematics, for algebra, geometry, astronomy, and the triumph of modern science -- mixed mathematics -- were all invented in India, just so much as the ten numerals, the very cornerstone of all present civilization, were discovered in India, and are in reality, Sanskrit words."

    There's so much more including the founding of gravity centuries before Newton, the heliocentric model of the solar system centuries before the Greeks, they computed the earth's diameter to be 7,840 miles (actual=7926), the distance earth - moon as 253,000 miles(actual 252,710) around 2000BC, they invented algebra and trigonometry and I could go on and on...

    Just a bit of education for those who don't know.
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    why not just make a poll and avoid arugments?
    p.s. my vote goes to the greeks
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    Just because it was done first in one place or another doesn't devalue later (re)discoveries or (re)inventions. Moreover, knowledge can be lost. There are tribes on the Andaman islands who didn't know how to start a fire in the 19th century - it's unlikely that none of their ancestors they had ever discovered fire; so presumably they had simply forgotten how to.

    I'm amused, though, that no-one here has tried to advance Chinese claims on priority. For instance, the I Ching (易經) could be regarded as proof that the Chinese knew about binary numbers as early as the 1st millennium BC. (I regard this as a rather tenuous claim, but I'm no expert.) A book from 179 AD contains evidence of Gaussian elimination. And of course, there's the Chinese remainder theorem.

    But it really doesn't matter.
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    (Original post by Zhen Lin)
    Just because it was done first in one place or another doesn't devalue later (re)discoveries or (re)inventions. Moreover, knowledge can be lost. There are tribes on the Andaman islands who didn't know how to start a fire in the 19th century - it's unlikely that none of their ancestors they had ever discovered fire; so presumably they had simply forgotten how to.

    I'm amused, though, that no-one here has tried to advance Chinese claims on priority. For instance, the I Ching (易經) could be regarded as proof that the Chinese knew about binary numbers as early as the 1st millennium BC. (I regard this as a rather tenuous claim, but I'm no expert.) A book from 179 AD contains evidence of Gaussian elimination. And of course, there's the Chinese remainder theorem.

    But it really doesn't matter.
    The thread title speaks for itself, :rolleyes: nobody is denying the contribution of the Chinese or Indian civilisations. Infact, in one of the links [in my above post] the site opens up to every single civilisation that has ever contributed to mathematics.
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    Wiki Support Team
    (Original post by mikoe)
    why not just make a poll and avoid arugments?
    p.s. my vote goes to the greeks
    It's not an argument, it's a discussion. Some people happen to find them interesting.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    It's not an argument, it's a discussion. Some people happen to find them interesting.
    Well I'd call it an argument if people are going off info by people's signatures - a discussion is where you respond to what the person actually says not accuse them of bias. I don't particularly find that interesting but I'm weird I guess :rolleyes:
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    My vote goes to Greeks only for one reason. Deprive the word 'Greeks' for from the 'r' and you'll get the reason why I voted for them .
 
 
 

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