V1544: Reform of the Gender Recognition Act (2004)

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Andrew97
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B1544: Reform of the Gender Recognition Act (2004), TSR Government
An Act to make the application process for a GRC less intrusive, whilst continuing to prevent it from misuse.

BE IT ENACTED by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:—

1. Amendments to Gender Recognition Act (2004)
  • Application subsection 1: A person of either gender who is aged at least 18 may make an application for a gender recognition certificate - to be reduced to 16 years.
  • Determination of applications subsection 1a: has lived in the acquired gender throughout the period of two years ending with the date on which the application is made - to be changed to 1.5 years for under 18s, and 6 months for over 18s.
  • Under marriage, a spouse will no longer have to consent for the marriage to continue for an applicant to be approved for a full GRC. Instead, they will have to go through divorce proceedings if they do not wish to continue the marriage.
  • Bill to include protections - those in ownership of a GRC should be sent to prisons that align with their recognised gender, where appropriate. Those on ownership of a GRC should be entitled to use shelters for their recognised gender.
  • GRCs to be extended to cover non-binary identities. Document will now include 'X' as well as 'M' or 'F'.
  • Cost to be reduced from £140 to £70, which can be made payable through installments.

2. Enforcement and Punishment
  • No enforcement or punishment is applicable to this bill.

3. Exemptions
  • To be sent to a prison that aligns with their recognised gender, an individual will have to have been in receipt of a GRC before sentencing, or they will have had to have lived as their acquired gender for at least a year, and not have committed violent crimes against the gender they identify as.

4. Extent
This Act extends to the United Kingdom.

5. Commencement

The provisions of this Act come into force on January 1st 2020.

6. Short Title

This Act may be cited as the Gender Recognition Act (Amendments) 2019
Last edited by Andrew97; 9 months ago
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Jammy Duel
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Even if it weren't a highly harmful bill the formatting alone is a reason to go "no, no, a million times no"
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SoggyCabbages
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This is a nay from me I'm afraid.
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shadowdweller
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(Original post by Jammy Duel)
Even if it weren't a highly harmful bill the formatting alone is a reason to go "no, no, a million times no"
Again, you had opportunity to raise this the first time the bill was read and didn't - not sure why you're raising it as a problem this time around.
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username2998742
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Obvious aye :yep:
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SoggyCabbages
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So if this bill passes on the 10th January 2020 do we go back 10 days in time so the provisions of this Act can come into force on the 1st January 2020?
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shadowdweller
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(Original post by SoggyCabbages)
So if this bill passes on the 10th January 2020 do we go back 10 days in time so the provisions of this Act can come into force on the 1st January 2020?
I must have missed that - as did everyone in the reading, for that matter - the first reading was in the tail end of last year, when that date was appropriate.
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CatusStarbright
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Abstain. I'd support this if the age for a gender recognition certificate was not being reduced to 16.
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SnowMiku
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#9
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Aye from me - esp. with the passport changes.
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shadowdweller
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(Original post by CatusStarbright)
Abstain. I'd support this if the age for a gender recognition certificate was not being reduced to 16.
This seems a slightly odd objection to me, in that at 16 you can legally change your name, get married (with parental consent in England, or without in Scotland), and have a child.

If you're old enough to do all that, you're definitely old enough to apply for your own gender to be legally recognised, especially when that decision is fully reversible on the rare chance of someone changing their mind.
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CatusStarbright
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(Original post by shadowdweller)
This seems a slightly odd objection to me, in that at 16 you can legally change your name, get married (with parental consent in England, or without in Scotland), and have a child.

If you're old enough to do all that, you're definitely old enough to apply for your own gender to be legally recognised, especially when that decision is fully reversible on the rare chance of someone changing their mind.
It makes sense that at 16 you can take charge of changing your name, as before that age your parents/guardians can do it for you - if you left the age until 18 then it's a long time where the person has no control over it and their parents/guardians retain that control. I'd make getting married 18 too, but that's another story.

I just think that such decisions should be adult decisions is all.
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salimyasin10
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Nay, 16 is still way too young
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username2998742
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(Original post by salimyasin10)
Nay, 16 is still way too young
Gonna copy-paste shadowdweller's reply because I feel it fully addresses your issue

"This seems a slightly odd objection to me, in that at 16 you can legally change your name, get married (with parental consent in England, or without in Scotland), and have a child. If you're old enough to do all that, you're definitely old enough to apply for your own gender to be legally recognised, especially when that decision is fully reversible on the rare chance of someone changing their mind."
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shadowdweller
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(Original post by CatusStarbright)
It makes sense that at 16 you can take charge of changing your name, as before that age your parents/guardians can do it for you - if you left the age until 18 then it's a long time where the person has no control over it and their parents/guardians retain that control. I'd make getting married 18 too, but that's another story.

I just think that such decisions should be adult decisions is all.
(Original post by salimyasin10)
Nay, 16 is still way too young
Just to reiterate - to apply for a GRC at 16, an individual would already have had to be living as the gender for over a year and a half; and that means they'd need to have evidence of this, which might include, for example, documentation displaying theindividual’s name and gender marker. They'd also need documentation from a medical professional confirming that the applicant has gender dysphoria.

The point here being that this isn't a decision a 16 year old could make at a drop of a hat, and it's not something they could do without significant evidence to support their application. What it does do is make things more straight forward for them from a legal perspective, nothing more, nothing less - they'd have already made the decision to live as the gender for an absolute minimum of 1.5 years. This would be one of the later steps in the process, not the first one by any means.
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CatusStarbright
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(Original post by shadowdweller)
Just to reiterate - to apply for a GRC at 16, an individual would already have had to be living as the gender for over a year and a half; and that means they'd need to have evidence of this, which might include, for example, documentation displaying theindividual’s name and gender marker. They'd also need documentation from a medical professional confirming that the applicant has gender dysphoria.

The point here being that this isn't a decision a 16 year old could make at a drop of a hat, and it's not something they could do without significant evidence to support their application. What it does do is make things more straight forward for them from a legal perspective, nothing more, nothing less - they'd have already made the decision to live as the gender for an absolute minimum of 1.5 years. This would be one of the later steps in the process, not the first one by any means.
I know what you're saying, but someone having made a decision at 14.5 or younger and who is now 16 is still not making an adult decision. To be honest I don't even see why legal gender is an issue in under-18s either.
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04MR17
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For future reference, a notes section with reasoning is often helpful, along with a link to the relevant section of legislation being reformed.

As stated in other threads, worth checking the commencement date before resubmitting an item.

Aye though.
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shadowdweller
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(Original post by 04MR17)
For future reference, a notes section with reasoning is often helpful, along with a link to the relevant section of legislation being reformed.

As stated in other threads, worth checking the commencement date before resubmitting an item.

Aye though.
The title of the bill should link to the legislation - noted on the other counts though!
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BosslyGaming
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Andrew97 Mr Speaker, I would just like to draw attention to the fact that there are currently 2 votes on behalf of seat 29 in this division (one from the seat holder, one from the registered proxy)
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04MR17
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(Original post by BosslyGaming)
Andrew97 Mr Speaker, I would just like to draw attention to the fact that there are currently 2 votes on behalf of seat 29 in this division (one from the seat holder, one from the registered proxy)
Change the proxy to any remaining seats you're missing votes on.
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BosslyGaming
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(Original post by 04MR17)
Change the proxy to any remaining seats you're missing votes on.
I'm not sure that's within the MHoC rules, considering seat 29 is a Conservative seat!
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