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    There never used to be this many round my way but lots have appeared in recent years. (There are 3 within walking distance of my parents house - two owned by the same company. Not long ago there only used to be one.)

    Has anyone else noticed this in their area and are you disturbed by this?

    Moral/religious reasons objections aside (as that is a completely different discussion for another forum), is anyone else disturbed by it?

    Although I will wander down every time there is a major football tournament on, I do wonder how such betting shops make ends meet given internet competition. (And who has time and money to spend all day in a bookies?)

    Also, how many of them will survive the recession?
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    As disposable income is being squished away, you will see many of them close within the next few years.

    Many of the punters in your average bookies are there for the social interaction and are too clueless to use the internet for gambling anyway, even if it met their social needs.
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    we have so many in Tooting, mostly filled with OAP's, I thinking social interaction....maybe to kill time...
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    Vice industries do well in a recession, gambling, porn, alcohol etc. as I guess it gives people a distraction. A couple of towns near me have gone to pot and the main shops that seemed to survive is those fruit machine arcades.

    A lot of "glamour" businesses will go under though. Watch out for nail bars, tan salons, etc going to the wall. Starbucks also had to close 600 of it stores because of its stupid business model of charging people 2 quid for something they could make for 10p at home. This is no bad thing in my opinion.
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    Supply and demand.
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    Although I will wander down every time there is a major football tournament on, I do wonder how such betting shops make ends meet given internet competition. (And who has time and money to spend all day in a bookies?)
    Pensioners, the 'working' class etc. They're ten a penny really, and generally don't really take a great deal to do with things like the internet.
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    Some people prefer a face-to-face social interraction, I guess; and there's obviously the demand. That's not to say it's a 'good thing' for everyone.
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    Easy money. If you start up your own betting shop, it'll be bought out by the competition very quickly.
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    credit crunch dictates most of them will **** off sooner or later.
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    Meh, people like to bet.
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    The shops my dad runs (30 or so) are doing fine, there is always a builder, plumber, brick layer etc. that is willing to foolishly lay down a few grand after a job.
    And it's true that a lot of people go for the social interaction, people spend hours in bookmakers watching spots and chatting getting the occasional coffee.

    Corals isn't going anywhere that's for sure. Dones though is dying in the south west.
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    Well Betting is a like a money making/ money losing scheme, hence an exchange. So there are winners and losers. This appeals to people.

    I guess some bets like Man U will win or Chelsea or Arsenal to win can generate a little bit of money over a long period time.
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    Re: all the stuff about pensioners and the working class, betting shops have been frequented by them for many years. My relatives who are as solid working class as I'll probably ever know (in terms of the "institutions" that have been part of their lives - trade unions, working mens clubs, working for many years with one large employer, rock solid community, etc) study the "form" like it's an academic subject.

    My question is around the expansion in recent years and whether in terms of the economy it is both desirable and sustainable. Desirable in terms of "what value added" do the activities of this industry add to both the economy and society? Sustainable in terms of "how robust" is the industry to the economic downturn on the back of both the rising prices of fuel and food, along with the credit crunch?

    As for the people who are the losers, end up with huge debts and have to declare bankrupcy, what impact do such write offs have on the economy and the livelihoods of those who end up addicted to gambling?
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    Sustainable in terms of "how robust" is the industry to the economic downturn on the back of both the rising prices of fuel and food, along with the credit crunch?
    jeremy kyle will always be there to help betting shops through times of economic hardship
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    I don't see why this should be any more disturbing than a glut of cinemas opening up, but you're probably right that a reduction in disposable income will take its toll.
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    (Original post by WithFlyingColours)
    Supply and demand.
    Working class people tend to bet more than the middle/upper class.

    A hope to be a billionaire for £1. What a bargain!
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    Because lots of people want to bet?

    Case, and hopefully thread, closed. Enjoy your market forces.
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    As for the people who are the losers, end up with huge debts and have to declare bankrupcy, what impact do such write offs have on the economy and the livelihoods of those who end up addicted to gambling?
    it isn't that common for this to occur.

    Just remember, the edge bookmakers have isn't that large. It would take either one big bet and an unlucky result or a large number of smaller bets over a long period of time to accomplish this.

    I'd wager that a similar number of people declare bankrupcy through other money investing schemes (such as launching a business).

    The average punter has a full time job and is betting with some of their wages.
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    My question is around the expansion in recent years and whether in terms of the economy it is both desirable and sustainable. Desirable in terms of "what value added" do the activities of this industry add to both the economy and society?
    This is a broken question. 'Society' and 'the economy' do not have objectively determinable wants; only the individuals that make them up do. The fact that they have chosen to spend their money on betting shops demonstrates that betting shops are what they want, and satisfying the wants of individuals is the only way in which 'value' can be 'added'.

    Sustainable in terms of "how robust" is the industry to the economic downturn on the back of both the rising prices of fuel and food, along with the credit crunch?
    What does this have to do with anything? Do you think the government should try to pre-emptively ban industries it determines not to be able to survive more than x number of years? If so there are a number of reasons why this sentiment is objectionable. Firstly, it represents coercive violence against peaceful individuals who are merely contracting services voluntarily to others. Secondly, there is no reason why an industry's inability to last the arbitrary x number of years should somehow diminish its value in the intervening period. And thirdly, there is no reason why the government should be more successful at banning productive enterprises against the will of its subjects than it has been in its attempts to take control of and direct their enterprises against their will, as with the former and present state monopolies.

    As for the people who are the losers, end up with huge debts and have to declare bankrupcy, what impact do such write offs have on the economy and the livelihoods of those who end up addicted to gambling?
    These are risks to which they consent when they place a bet. Do you propose to ban interest on loans, investing in shares, Etc on the same grounds?
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    (Original post by Collingwood)
    This is a broken question. 'Society' and 'the economy' do not have objectively determinable wants; only the individuals that make them up do. The fact that they have chosen to spend their money on betting shops demonstrates that betting shops are what they want, and satisfying the wants of individuals is the only way in which 'value' can be 'added'.
 
 
 
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