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The "Am I good enough for Investment Banking/Consultancy?" Thread watch

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    Hey guys I'm an Irish final year undergrad studying law with psychology from a not too reputable university I've got a GPA of 3/4 and hope to bring it up to 3.3ish this year (for now let's assume I get it as far as 3.2) I was always great at maths and sciences and achieved highest in my school in both physics and higher level maths leaving cert.

    I've became really really interested however in the financial markets and want to make a living in investment banking or private equity in London or New York. I read all the leading magazines and I'm currently teaching myself excel online

    My question is is it possible for me to break into this business? I'm willing in fact more than happy to do a masters and was looking at lse diploma in finance and accounting as a way in. My dream is to work in New York though so what would be the best bet?

    Should I go for further study? Should I look for internships and if so where? Would any companies in Dublin be a good choice for internships or would I have to go abroad?

    Any one with previous experience of this predicament?

    Or should I pack it in and realise my dream of breaking the world record for most cream crackers eaten in one minute?
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    everyone with half a brain is good enough for IB, myself and yourself included. What you should be asking is: Do I really want to go into banking?


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    Any point trying to trying go down the IB (interested in Sales the most) route having not done Maths/Economics at A level?

    Currently on a gap year working at a commercial law firm and will be studying Law next year - got unconditionals from Bristol + Exeter, and waiting on LSE, Durham + KCL. LSE is my preferred choice, followed by KCL, then Durham/Bristol.

    I ask the question because I have done a couple of the A level schemes at JP Morgan and RBS, both of which were pretty good, however I am pretty sure I was the only/one of a handful of people who attended these that hadn't taken any maths related subject post GCSEs.
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    You need neither.
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    (Original post by Unsworth)
    Any point trying to trying go down the IB (interested in Sales the most) route having not done Maths/Economics at A level?

    Currently on a gap year working at a commercial law firm and will be studying Law next year - got unconditionals from Bristol + Exeter, and waiting on LSE, Durham + KCL. LSE is my preferred choice, followed by KCL, then Durham/Bristol.

    I ask the question because I have done a couple of the A level schemes at JP Morgan and RBS, both of which were pretty good, however I am pretty sure I was the only/one of a handful of people who attended these that hadn't taken any maths related subject post GCSEs.
    No I haven't got A Level Maths either (although I do have Economics). Don't let it put you off, just study the Maths you don't know - it isn't that hard and there isn't that much.

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    (Original post by will2348)
    No I haven't got A Level Maths either (although I do have Economics). Don't let it put you off, just study the Maths you don't know - it isn't that hard and there isn't that much.

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    From some of the practise SHL tests I have done on their website they don't seem to be anything too difficult, assuming the actual tests used by the banks are of that kind of standard? That's reassuring anyway, I was more concerned with whether it would make an application be less highly regarded because of not having done one of these subjects, rather than how much maths is actually needed on the job.
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    (Original post by Unsworth)
    From some of the practise SHL tests I have done on their website they don't seem to be anything too difficult, assuming the actual tests used by the banks are of that kind of standard? That's reassuring anyway, I was more concerned with whether it would make an application be less highly regarded because of not having done one of these subjects, rather than how much maths is actually needed on the job.
    Tests don't really impact anything, they are mainly used to weed out those struggling with even basic mathematical concepts (and a lot of people do).
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    (Original post by Unsworth)
    From some of the practise SHL tests I have done on their website they don't seem to be anything too difficult, assuming the actual tests used by the banks are of that kind of standard? That's reassuring anyway, I was more concerned with whether it would make an application be less highly regarded because of not having done one of these subjects, rather than how much maths is actually needed on the job.
    As post above. No, banks don't really care about your subject (as long as you score highly in the subjects you actually do) and have the aptitude to do the job - which in all honesty, most people probably do.

    Some practice SHL tests are easier than the real things but the real tests aren't that hard - timing is the biggest issue usually. Practice via Assessment Day to get familiar and you'll easily smash them.

    Mostly dealing with charts, graphs, ratios, percentages, percentage change, variance, averages, currency conversion calculations, time/distance/speed etc. that kind of stuff in the tests.

    Logical tests are probably the hardest.

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    (Original post by CEKTOP)
    Tests don't really impact anything, they are mainly used to weed out those struggling with even basic mathematical concepts (and a lot of people do).

    (Original post by will2348)
    As post above. No, banks don't really care about your subject (as long as you score highly in the subjects you actually do) and have the aptitude to do the job - which in all honesty, most people probably do.

    Some practice SHL tests are easier than the real things but the real tests aren't that hard - timing is the biggest issue usually. Practice via Assessment Day to get familiar and you'll easily smash them.

    Mostly dealing with charts, graphs, ratios, percentages, percentage change, variance, averages, currency conversion calculations, time/distance/speed etc. that kind of stuff in the tests.

    Logical tests are probably the hardest.

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    Ah I see, interesting, thanks both!
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    (Original post by Intriguing Alias)
    It's hard to know why exactly LSE has better prospects than the other top universities, especially if you look at CUG's stats on Geography, LSE has 91% vs the next highest Cambridge with 78% - the difference is quite large. I'd propose (with nothing but anecdotal evidence) that in general, people going to LSE are already more focused on careers. I'm at Cambridge and I see a lot of friends, including Geographer friends, who haven't given a second thought to careers yet (and I'm in second year) - whereas I'd expect most equivalent Geography students at LSE to be applying to internships already with perhaps a lot of them having got one during the summer after first year.

    Between the likes of LSE, Oxford, Cambridge etc. I personally wouldn't give much attention to differences in graduate prospects, as I think if you're someone who's already thinking about careers - you'll get the same out of any of them. You should think about which university you would actually like to study at in terms of course enjoyment, location, atmosphere etc.
    I second this from an Oxford perspective

    (Original post by Unsworth)
    Any point trying to trying go down the IB (interested in Sales the most) route having not done Maths/Economics at A level?

    Currently on a gap year working at a commercial law firm and will be studying Law next year - got unconditionals from Bristol + Exeter, and waiting on LSE, Durham + KCL. LSE is my preferred choice, followed by KCL, then Durham/Bristol.

    I ask the question because I have done a couple of the A level schemes at JP Morgan and RBS, both of which were pretty good, however I am pretty sure I was the only/one of a handful of people who attended these that hadn't taken any maths related subject post GCSEs.
    I have a feeling we might of met - I was at J.P. and RBS too and we spoke in the thread about them Don't worry about maths, I read history at uni and my only maths after GCSE was at AS and a bit of GCSE foundation level maths tutoring, and so far I've got a spring week offer from Credit Suisse and interviews with Barclays and JPM coming up, so I'd say it isn't that important. Just make sure you pass the numerical tests, and when you apply to spring weeks next year reply to the JPM follow up email to say you've applied. Probably your biggest challenge'll be to convince them that you want to be a banker rather than a corporate lawyer with a law degree and so much legal work experience
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    (Original post by AJW 12394)
    I have a feeling we might of met - I was at J.P. and RBS too and we spoke in the thread about them Don't worry about maths, I read history at uni and my only maths after GCSE was at AS and a bit of GCSE foundation level maths tutoring, and so far I've got a spring week offer from Credit Suisse and interviews with Barclays and JPM coming up, so I'd say it isn't that important. Just make sure you pass the numerical tests, and when you apply to spring weeks next year reply to the JPM follow up email to say you've applied. Probably your biggest challenge'll be to convince them that you want to be a banker rather than a corporate lawyer with a law degree and so much legal work experience
    Ah we most likely have! Congratulations on the offer + interviews - great situation to be in. Yeah that is true, although I could always use the whole line of doing a gap year programme at a law firm ultimately put me off wanting to go the law route and would rather be on the client side, i.e banks, having experienced it first hand. Both interest me in truth, but as all the important programmes aren't until second year for law, I don't see any harm in trying to go for the spring weeks in first year.
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    (Original post by Unsworth)
    Ah we most likely have! Congratulations on the offer + interviews - great situation to be in. Yeah that is true, although I could always use the whole line of doing a gap year programme at a law firm ultimately put me off wanting to go the law route and would rather be on the client side, i.e banks, having experienced it first hand. Both interest me in truth, but as all the important programmes aren't until second year for law, I don't see any harm in trying to go for the spring weeks in first year.
    Cheers and yeah, that's a good line of argument, and if I don't enjoy spring weeks I'll probs be applying to law firms in 2nd year too

    You can also say your gap year helped you appreciate how law firms support IBs
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    studying maths at KCL, 2:1 in first year
    A levels:
    maths, further maths, economics, geograph - A*AAB
    GCSEs:
    maths, double science - 3 A*'s
    English Lit, English Lang, French, Geography, R.E - 5 A's


    I am interested in management consultancy. I don't know what role I want to do in a bank. Looking at internships at the moment and researching.
    Some silly questions just in case someone is willing to answer/give advice:
    How do you show enthusiasm for something you don't know will be like? I also haven't got relevant work experience, just supermarket job/volunteering etc. If I can't give evidence of all the skills they ask for, is it ok to say I want to build up on these skills? And where do you recommend I apply? (nowhere?)


    Thank you.


    Jasmine
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    Hi I have the following offers, which of these would give me the best chance of breaking into IB? With reasons please.

    Lancaster - Finance and economics
    Durham - Finance
    Newcastle - Economics and finance
    Leeds - Economics and finance
    Exeter - Economics and finance
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    (Original post by The Eden project)
    Hi I have the following offers, which of these would give me the best chance of breaking into IB? With reasons please.

    Lancaster - Finance and economics
    Durham - Finance
    Newcastle - Economics and finance
    Leeds - Economics and finance
    Exeter - Economics and finance

    Durham or Exeter, but leaning towards the former. Both good for IB's.
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    i am thinking of doing: maths and f-maths history english lit physics thanks for the help
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    (Original post by Drogue)
    As well as university and course comparisons, we seem to be getting a lot of threads asking "Am I good enough for IB/C" with something about someone's grades, university, extra curriculars, work experience, etc. This thread is for all those questions.
    I'm an Australian lawyer. I'm relocating to the UK in June and I'm considering my options for work. I'm not sure I want to go into private practice (re-qualifying for E&W aside). Apart from an interest in consultancy, that's why i'm enquiring into my suitability in this thread.

    My qualifications
    5 year LLB awarded with 2nd class Honours
    1 year Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice awarded with Merit and
    3 year Bachelor of Arts in French.

    I'm studying for a 1 year Diploma in Project Management.

    "A-Levels": I did IB and have 390 ish UCAS tariff points.

    As for my "GCSE" results, I studied both in UK and NZ at around the time people tend do the GCSEs and can't give a straight answer as to my marks as the bulk was done in NZ while they were changing over from a Sixth Form Certificate setup to NCEA. There are three levels of NCEA, the last giving you entry into University. I did the earlier levels 1 and 2 and both were awarded with merit (grades go not achieved, achieved, merit, excellence).

    I've worked as a paralegal for 2 1/2 years and been in lawyer type roles (pro bono), worked in customer service for about 4 years, sales for 1 year, project management and policy for less than one year.

    Am I good enough for Investment Banking/Consultancy? Where would be a good place for me to start off in the area?
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    What A-Levels are you going to do?
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    (Original post by jamesubrown)
    What A-Levels are you going to do?
    I did the IB - maths, history, English, chemistry, physics, theory of knowledge and french.


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    Get AAAA ---> Oxbridge, LSE, Warwick, UCL, Imperial ---> Pick up work experience in banks ie. back office roles/spring weeks (network well here; make the right contacts) ----> at uni: do a few extra curriculars i.e. positions of responsibility, student journalism, Model U.N, AIESEC, start up a business and turn a profit (the hardest, but most respected), part time job, finance/investment/entrepreneur society, Traders society etc (just some example, there are better ones I am sure.) -- join it and do something credible and tangible, maintain a 60% minimum average, of course a 1st ALWAYS looks better than hitting the minimum 2.1 ----> 2nd year apply for internships ---> hopefully land an internship with a BB/2nd tier firm ---> convert internship into an offer/otherwise leverage the experience and apply to all other banks which will surely yield an offer in investment banking. Graduate with a 1st/2.1 Note: investment banking is a very broad field, you need to find out which role you think is the best fit for you i.e. sales/trading, research, IBD, private wealth, operations, risk management, finance, technology etc Just something I threw together based on observation and successful candidates I personally know or on TSR.
 
 
 
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