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    (Original post by areusureaboutthat)
    im studying economics at lancaster. good enough?
    Not a target by quite a long way, but if you have good extracurriculars and work experience then it's possible. Do you?
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    im studying economics at lancaster. good enough?
    It'll be tough. Your best bet might be to Master at a more 'prestigious' university. Either way you'll need to be in the top 10% of your cohort, at least.
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    Currently in first year of college and trying to decide between Economics and Law.

    GCSEs A*AAAAABBBCDD
    Predicted AS- Maths A
    Physics A
    History A
    Economics A
    Chemistry B

    My GCSEs are weak compared to some other candidates but would my improved AS levels and hopefully A levels allow me to go to a uni that would give me a good career in IB?
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    (Original post by Zerkaa)
    Currently in first year of college and trying to decide between Economics and Law.

    GCSEs A*AAAAABBBCDD
    Predicted AS- Maths A
    Physics A
    History A
    Economics A
    Chemistry B

    My GCSEs are weak compared to some other candidates but would my improved AS levels and hopefully A levels allow me to go to a uni that would give me a good career in IB?
    Your GCSEs aren't too sharp, but you can pull things back in the next couple of years. Your ASs are looking quite good at the moment, but don't get complacent.

    The subjects you've chosen keep both degree options open to you. My 2 pence? If you're not 100% sure you want to go into law, study Economics. It's very common to do a law conversion course after an unrelated degree subject, and indeed around half of entrants into law firms take this route. But if you do law and then decide, say, that you want to be a banker, things will be a lot tougher for you.
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    (Original post by Zerkaa)
    Currently in first year of college and trying to decide between Economics and Law.

    GCSEs A*AAAAABBBCDD
    Predicted AS- Maths A
    Physics A
    History A
    Economics A
    Chemistry B

    My GCSEs are weak compared to some other candidates but would my improved AS levels and hopefully A levels allow me to go to a uni that would give me a good career in IB?
    I agree with what Bramlow has said tbh. Also I know a lot of people doing law at uni, and there are a fair few who wish they hadn't. Law is definitely something you shouldn't study unless you're 100% certain you want to do it tbh.

    However while a degree in law may not be as helpful as economics for a career in banking, if it's management consulting then a knowledge of law is definitely not a bad thing.
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    Hey. I'm currently in my second year on a 4 year MEng Electronic Engineering degree at the University of Southampton. I have As in A Level Maths, Physics, Electronic and AS Further Maths and last year I averaged 77% and expect something similar this year.

    Now normally I would be fairly confident in my academic ability but I've been rejected from both internship schemes I've applied for this year. The first was the RBS Summer Internship in Sales and Trading and the second was the Goldman Sachs Spring Program. Is it simply that my grades aren't good enough or is there something more I should be doing? The only major thing I can see lacking on my CV is part time employment - although there is some there - and perhaps other standard extra curricula activities such as sport.

    If anyone can give me a few pointers it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
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    (Original post by John_Galt)
    Hey. I'm currently in my second year on a 4 year MEng Electronic Engineering degree at the University of Southampton. I have As in A Level Maths, Physics, Electronic and AS Further Maths and last year I averaged 77% and expect something similar this year.

    Now normally I would be fairly confident in my academic ability but I've been rejected from both internship schemes I've applied for this year. The first was the RBS Summer Internship in Sales and Trading and the second was the Goldman Sachs Spring Program. Is it simply that my grades aren't good enough or is there something more I should be doing? The only major thing I can see lacking on my CV is part time employment - although there is some there - and perhaps other standard extra curricula activities such as sport.

    If anyone can give me a few pointers it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
    Could be that your CV/Cover letter aren't strong, or are poorly presented. Could be your university holding you back - Southampton isn't a target for the banks.

    The main point I'd make though, is that you're basing your aptitude on the result of two applications, which is a big mistake. If Really you should be making a lot more, probably 15+. If you'd applied to this many and still received nada, then it might be possible to make some comment on whether you're doing something fundamentally wrong. I made at least 30 applications for summer internships in 2007 & 2008, I think I might have been invited to 9 interviews, 4 assessment centres, 2 offers. You need to apply to lots.
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    (Original post by John_Galt)
    Hey. I'm currently in my second year on a 4 year MEng Electronic Engineering degree at the University of Southampton. I have As in A Level Maths, Physics, Electronic and AS Further Maths and last year I averaged 77% and expect something similar this year.

    Now normally I would be fairly confident in my academic ability but I've been rejected from both internship schemes I've applied for this year. The first was the RBS Summer Internship in Sales and Trading and the second was the Goldman Sachs Spring Program. Is it simply that my grades aren't good enough or is there something more I should be doing? The only major thing I can see lacking on my CV is part time employment - although there is some there - and perhaps other standard extra curricula activities such as sport.

    If anyone can give me a few pointers it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
    For a start, you're void from applying to RBS anyway as you're not penultimate year... So your only valid application was for Goldman Sachs. There's really no reason for not applying to at least 10-15 banks and hedging your bets.

    You may have the academics, but what else do you have going? what related work experience to finance? what society positions are you currently holding? do you speak more than one language? I'm sure there's many ways in which your application could have been stronger.. Coming from Southampton, you're going to need more than just university name/straight A's on your CV to get the interviews..
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    Thanks to both of you for the replies. Let's see...

    (Original post by loggins)
    Could be that your CV/Cover letter aren't strong, or are poorly presented. Could be your university holding you back - Southampton isn't a target for the banks.
    Without trying to sound too far up my own arse: I did turn down both UCL and Imperial to come here! Although, the motivation behind that was for the department's prestige rather than the University's itself. I didn't think it was bad enough to make that much difference though.

    The main point I'd make though, is that you're basing your aptitude on the result of two applications, which is a big mistake. If Really you should be making a lot more, probably 15+. If you'd applied to this many and still received nada, then it might be possible to make some comment on whether you're doing something fundamentally wrong. I made at least 30 applications for summer internships in 2007 & 2008, I think I might have been invited to 9 interviews, 4 assessment centres, 2 offers. You need to apply to lots.
    This is more what I was hoping to hear. I did plan on applying for a fair few more than the two but by the time I got my CV and everything else together most of the deadlines had closed. My RBS application didn't go in unti laround mid December; even though the position was still advertised as open is it likely they had already filled most of the places? The same goes for the GS one as well, which I think I applied for a few weeks before the January 31st deadline.

    The above paragraph probably doesn't speak wonders for my commitment to investment banking. In fact I might as well admit that although it's always been at the back of my mind, it didn't actually occur to me that this is what I wanted to do until a few months ago. In fact I still don't know that it is what I want to do; my main reason for applying to these internship positions is to get a better idea of what working in an IB would be like so I can compare it to engineering and see where I want to go.

    I'm in the fortunate position where I effectively have 2 penultimate years due to the possibility of taking a masters. If, in around 6 months time, I still think IB is for me then I'll spend the back end of the summer holidays preparing application forms etc to give myself a better chance.


    (Original post by Haz313)
    For a start, you're void from applying to RBS anyway as you're not penultimate year... So your only valid application was for Goldman Sachs. There's really no reason for not applying to at least 10-15 banks and hedging your bets.
    I put on my RBS application that I was due to graduate in 2011, which is possible if I decide to opt out of the masters. I suppose this may have made me look worse as doing an MEng is the norm for most engineers at decent universities these days.

    You may have the academics, but what else do you have going? what related work experience to finance? what society positions are you currently holding? do you speak more than one language? I'm sure there's many ways in which your application could have been stronger.. Coming from Southampton, you're going to need more than just university name/straight A's on your CV to get the interviews..
    I study Chinese entirely in my own time and spent 5 weeks in China last year - 3 of which was on a government sponsored program at a Chinese university with the primary aim of developing language skills and general cultural awareness. Unfortunately my Chinese still isn't great but I work on it when I find the time and hope to go there again this summer to improve it.

    I don't hold any societies positions for the main reason that there are very few societies (if any) that I want to be part of. Is that putting me at such a disadvantage? If so, is it worth biting the bullet and taking part in something my heart isn't 100% in?

    As for the related work experience: is there really much besides a proper internship that someone of my age can do? As stated above, the reason I'm applying for these things is to get the experience in the first place.

    I suppose this is probably the best place to ask: my main problem with my degree - and what I presume will also be for a career in electronic engineering - is the lack of maths and mathematical analysis involved. This might sound surprising and it came as a shock to me too. Despite the amount of mathematical theory covered in the course when it comes to the practical side of things there is virtually none. What I'm hoping to find out of a financially related career is the opportunity to use math related skills on a regular basis. Of course there are over things such as the lifestyle, location and pay which appeal to me but the main draw is something that's analytically challenging. Will I find this in an IB career or am I looking in the wrong place?
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    (Original post by John_Galt)
    Thanks to both of you for the replies. Let's see...



    Without trying to sound too far up my own arse: I did turn down both UCL and Imperial to come here! Although, the motivation behind that was for the department's prestige rather than the University's itself. I didn't think it was bad enough to make that much difference though.

    If I'm honest, for Banking, your uni will probably be the biggest stumbling block over the next few years if all you say holds. If you wanted to get into Banking, UCL/Imperial would have been far better choices. The fact is, nobody in the City cares about your course/dept prestige, it's all about the uni.

    If you build up the CV and the ECs, you'll have a shot at interviews, without these sparkling CV additions, you should probably accept that recruiters are going to spend a few seconds less looking at your application than those applicants from a top 5 uni.
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    I more or less second what Loggins said. Southampton is a solid university, but when it comes to investment banking it's not just neutral, but a negative. You will need to differentiate yourself in other ways.

    Academically, you're currently excelling in your course. You'll need to keep that up, but you'll want to do more. An internship (or several) is almost essential. And you'll need to do something extracurricular-wise - I just don't buy that there's nothing that interests you out there.

    Chinese is a great language to have but if you're not fluent in it, it won't be much of an asset. Banks want people who can actually do business in the language. I've been studying Mandarin for 2 1/2 years myself, and while I can have a conversation and get around everyday life without too many problems, I probably won't even mention it on my applications.

    EDIT: Oh, and don't forget networking. It might yield nothing, but equally when effective it can allow you to bend or break most of the rules and advice we dish out here.
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    (Original post by John_Galt)
    Hey. I'm currently in my second year on a 4 year MEng Electronic Engineering degree at the University of Southampton
    I've been rejected from both internship schemes I've applied for
    University of Southampton : to overcome that disadvantage, network like crazy and do remarkable EC's,
    (Interview the Dalai Lama or go training with the SEALS ) or else try middle or back office internships

    (Original post by John_Galt)
    I did turn down both UCL and Imperial to come here! Although, the motivation behind that was for the department's prestige rather than the University's itself.
    It might be prestigious in the Engineering world.
    If so, leverage it and become an engineer.
    I understand that Goldsmith's is prestigious in the art world.
    Cant see that helping an IB applicant from Goldsmiths
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    It might be prestigious in the Engineering world. If so, leverage it and become an engineer.
    This isn't bad advice. Getting into engineering is comparatively easy, it's a great career, and if you're a star at it you can MBA then enter banking/consulting 3-5 years down the line.

    (Interview the Dalai Lama or go training with the SEALS )
    I chuckled at this because I actually did interview the Dalai Lama (albeit as part of a group) a couple of years ago. It's not something I'll be putting on my CV, however.
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    Bsc Maths

    or

    Maths with Business management

    for Big 4,

    Will the later get me more exceptions ?
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    (Original post by Thomassss)
    Bsc Maths

    or

    Maths with Business management

    for Big 4,

    Will the later get me more exceptions ?
    Not a big difference. Again it depends which university you're planning to study at.
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    This isn't bad advice. Getting into engineering is comparatively easy, it's a great career, and if you're a star at it you can MBA then enter banking/consulting 3-5 years down the line.



    I chuckled at this because I actually did interview the Dalai Lama (albeit as part of a group) a couple of years ago. It's not something I'll be putting on my CV, however.
    Why not? :confused:. If I were an interviewer I'd be quite interested to see something like that on a CV. Nice little conversation piece too.
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    (Original post by loggins)
    Why not? . If I were an interviewer I'd be quite interested to see something like that on a CV. Nice little conversation piece too.
    It was never something I debated with myself in detail, it just seemed a little gratuitous. I did a lot journalism at university and got to interview quite a few 'celebrities' and public figures. I always sort of cringed at the idea of name-dropping particular folks on the CV, although that might just be a personal foible.
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    It was never something I debated with myself in detail, it just seemed a little gratuitous. I did a lot journalism at university and got to interview quite a few 'celebrities' and public figures. I always sort of cringed at the idea of name-dropping particular folks on the CV, although that might just be a personal foible.
    Jesus you actually quoted me properly for once so it appeared in my "Who Quoted Me" tab :p:!

    That's fair enough, I suppose it is kind of name dropping. Still an interesting thing though, I'd probably have it on my CV.
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    (Original post by loggins)
    Jesus you actually quoted me properly for once so it appeared in my "Who Quoted Me" tab :p:!
    I'm starting to overcome my Quick Reply habits. You have a new era of properly name-tagged quotes to look forward to. :cool:
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    (Original post by flugestuge)
    University of Southampton : to overcome that disadvantage, network like crazy and do remarkable EC's,
    Jesus. I really had no idea it would have that much of an affect. They certainly don't tell you that at the open days.


    It might be prestigious in the Engineering world.
    If so, leverage it and become an engineer.
    I understand that Goldsmith's is prestigious in the art world.
    Cant see that helping an IB applicant from Goldsmiths
    But banking and engineering have a lot of similar elements; literature and banking don't. Surely the banks know which university's are prestigious for which subjects and preference candidates accordingly?

    (Original post by Bramlow)
    This isn't bad advice. Getting into engineering is comparatively easy, it's a great career, and if you're a star at it you can MBA then enter banking/consulting 3-5 years down the line.
    So by this you mean work for a few years, study a finance related masters and then try and get into IB? Why not go straight in to a masters rather than working in something unrelated beforehand?
 
 
 
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