lhh2003
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#1
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#1
Apparently employees at tech firms don't care what you , or a piece of paper, say you know, but rather what you can make and have made.

Is this true ?
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Blue_Cow
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(Original post by lhh2003)
Apparently employees at tech firms don't care what you , or a piece of paper, say you know, but rather what you can make and have made.

Is this true ?
A degree is just a way to filter people out. For tech especially, having work experience through internships is extremely important. Then you have to be able to survive things like CodeVue, then a technical/whiteboard interview etc.

There are plenty of CS graduates - just not enough CS graduates with work experience and the ability to write good code. Look at the unemployment rate for CS grads. A CS degree is not useless, but a CS degree with zero work experience, zero personal portfolio pretty much is.
Last edited by Blue_Cow; 1 year ago
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winterscoming
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90% of the time, they don't care about the bit of paper, but that doesn't mean spending 3 years studying on a degree where you'd hopefully be learning all of the skills which employers are interested in is useless (but it's certainly not the only path/option - another good option is to follow a Degree-Apprenticeship programme). In the time a typical CompSci undergrad takes to get through a degree, most should have done tonnes of assignments related to coding, tech and problem solving.

The degree would of course be useless for someone who somehow managed to get past those 3 years without having learned very much, without having put much effort into making a good final-year project, and also who may just not be all that interested in the subject (e.g. they took CompSci because someone told them it'd get them a high-paid job but have no real interest in being a coder or working in tech).

Employers also value people's attitudes, motivation and professional skills (communication, teamwork, leadership) - so technical and problem solving skills are of course by far the most important thing, but being able to work with other people in on projects in a team is also really important.

With that said, most are perfectly willing to hire people who self-taught everything - e.g. having a GitHub profile which contains lots of personal hobby coding projects, being able to talk about the kinds of spare-time things they're doing or reading about related to tech. Being able to show alot of enthusiasm and passion for wanting to work in tech is also really important. That'd certainly be the case in most mainstream jobs - e.g. Software Engineering, "Devops", Network/infrastructure, Hardware/system engineering, Database admin..

Lastly, some areas of IT are more academic than others - some jobs lean more towards cutting-edge R&D, which benefit a lot from having a strong background in mathematics and academic study, although these tend to be a lot more niche than most mainstream tech jobs.
Last edited by winterscoming; 1 year ago
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