Ailurophile03
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#1
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Shouldn’t they all form alkaline solution
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Porkypig800
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#2
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1 and 3 only. In water, alkaline solutions dissociate to release OH- ions and solution 2 has no Oxygen so cannot be alkaline
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Ailurophile03
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But doesn’t Alkali metal from alkaline solution
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Marsharko
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(Original post by Porkypig800)
1 and 3 only. In water, alkaline solutions dissociate to release OH- ions and solution 2 has no Oxygen so cannot be alkaline
I thought it is 1 only.

For 3, NaHSO4 it dissociates like this;

NaHSO4 -> Na+ + HSO4-

then

HSO4 + H20 <-> H3O+ + SO4-

where H3O is acidic, making NaHSO4 in solution a weak acid.
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Ailurophile03
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(Original post by Sharmarko)
I thought it is 1 only.

For 3, NaHSO4 it dissociates like this;

NaHSO4 -> Na+ + HSO4-

then

HSO4 + H20 <-> H3O+ + SO4-

where H3O is acidic, making NaHSO4 in solution a weak acid.
Indeed it’s one only but what about nacl
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Marsharko
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(Original post by Ailurophile03)
But doesn’t Alkali metal from alkaline solution
Na is an alkali metal, but NaCl is a salt. Salts cannot dissociate H+ ions or OH- ions in solution from my understanding, so it's definitely not option 2.
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Ailurophile03
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(Original post by Sharmarko)
Na is an alkali metal, but NaCl is a salt. Salts cannot dissociate H+ ions or OH- ions in solution from my understanding, so it's definitely not option 2.
But isn’t Na alkali metal
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Marsharko
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(Original post by Ailurophile03)
But isn’t Na alkali metal
Yep, Na is alkali metal. If it was just putting Na into the solution then I would agree with you, it would make an alkali solution.

But we aren't putting Na into water, we are putting NaCl into water. I'm not sure how to explain it well, but there is a topic in year 2 a-level chemistry that helped me understand it.

Basically, a salt that was made from a strong acid + strong base will always have Ph 7 in solution. NaCl happens to be a salt made from a strong acid and strong base. But even before this, you can see it has no H or O atoms as a molecule, so instinctively to me it makes sense it cannot be 2.

I hope this made sense, sorry if I couldn't explain it effectively.
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Ailurophile03
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(Original post by Sharmarko)
Yep, Na is alkali metal. If it was just putting Na into the solution then I would agree with you, it would make an alkali solution.

But we aren't putting Na into water, we are putting NaCl into water. I'm not sure how to explain it well, but there is a topic in year 2 a-level chemistry that helped me understand it.

Basically, a salt that was made from a strong acid + strong base will always have Ph 7 in solution. NaCl happens to be a salt made from a strong acid and strong base. But even before this, you can see it has no H or O atoms as a molecule, so instinctively to me it makes sense it cannot be 2.

I hope this made sense, sorry if I couldn't explain it effectively.
I understand this thank u very much 😊
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Ailurophile03
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#10
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(Original post by Sharmarko)
Yep, Na is alkali metal. If it was just putting Na into the solution then I would agree with you, it would make an alkali solution.

But we aren't putting Na into water, we are putting NaCl into water. I'm not sure how to explain it well, but there is a topic in year 2 a-level chemistry that helped me understand it.

Basically, a salt that was made from a strong acid + strong base will always have Ph 7 in solution. NaCl happens to be a salt made from a strong acid and strong base. But even before this, you can see it has no H or O atoms as a molecule, so instinctively to me it makes sense it cannot be 2.

I hope this made sense, sorry if I couldn't explain it effectively.
but for sodium carbonate, isnt carbonate acidic
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