Is it even worth going back to education if they don't educate? Watch

sihamam981
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My experience in further/higher education has been terrible. I'm trying to work out if it's worth it to go back but I don't know

After GCSEs I went to a local college and enrolled on what was supposed to have been a vocational course and volunteered on the side but they didn't teach skills for work and I wasn't able to find a job. They also left me a poor mark on my final module and this gave me a terrible grade although their lecturers didn't turn up to TEACH that part of the course.

I then tried going to a local "learning institution" for a foundation degree and the lecturers tried to bury the course. The student union got involved and forced them to run the course, but the lecturers didn't turn up. Everyone walked out. I was still charged for the whole year on my student loans.

After that I went to a different college and attempted a foundation degree. It was appalling, the lecturers didn't know the industry, their attendance was poor especially in the second year and again there was no training for work. Everyone passed with flying grades and no standards were enforced. This meant I was not able to get a job (nor most students) because I wasn't familiar with what employers wanted.

I know what my mistake was, it was going to these horrible local colleges instead of uni. But I really thought that if you went for an education that you received relevant exposure to your selected industry. I've never had industry connections to work from and I specifically went to local colleges because I thought there would be more chance of work-based learning or at least SOMETHING that would lead to work and not left to figure it all out yourself.

Another error I made was being naive and assuming that educators were people who could be trusted with educating you about the subject. In my experience it's virtually always left now to google. My parents' experience was completely different, they were sent to study and received a directive education. That was my point of reference. In my experience I've had to google everything myself to the point where I thought, why am I even paying for this? So that was a complete mistake.

It seems like if you don't already have the background in the subject and have work lined up, it's just going to be a waste of time and money. I wasn't complacent on these courses, I took initiative and taught myself as much as I could, I put myself out there and worked for free if it just meant a possible opportunity. Most of my family is dead and I've had to endure poverty, I've been homeless twice. Is having an education worth it then, if the education system assumes you already know what you're doing and feel like giving away free money? Is that the system we have in place?
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999tigger
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(Original post by sihamam981)
My experience in further/higher education has been terrible. I'm trying to work out if it's worth it to go back but I don't know

After GCSEs I went to a local college and enrolled on what was supposed to have been a vocational course and volunteered on the side but they didn't teach skills for work and I wasn't able to find a job. They also left me a poor mark on my final module and this gave me a terrible grade although their lecturers didn't turn up to TEACH that part of the course.

I then tried going to a local "learning institution" for a foundation degree and the lecturers tried to bury the course. The student union got involved and forced them to run the course, but the lecturers didn't turn up. Everyone walked out. I was still charged for the whole year on my student loans.

After that I went to a different college and attempted a foundation degree. It was appalling, the lecturers didn't know the industry, their attendance was poor especially in the second year and again there was no training for work. Everyone passed with flying grades and no standards were enforced. This meant I was not able to get a job (nor most students) because I wasn't familiar with what employers wanted.

I know what my mistake was, it was going to these horrible local colleges instead of uni. But I really thought that if you went for an education that you received relevant exposure to your selected industry. I've never had industry connections to work from and I specifically went to local colleges because I thought there would be more chance of work-based learning or at least SOMETHING that would lead to work and not left to figure it all out yourself.

Another error I made was being naive and assuming that educators were people who could be trusted with educating you about the subject. In my experience it's virtually always left now to google. My parents' experience was completely different, they were sent to study and received a directive education. That was my point of reference. In my experience I've had to google everything myself to the point where I thought, why am I even paying for this? So that was a complete mistake.

It seems like if you don't already have the background in the subject and have work lined up, it's just going to be a waste of time and money. I wasn't complacent on these courses, I took initiative and taught myself as much as I could, I put myself out there and worked for free if it just meant a possible opportunity. Most of my family is dead and I've had to endure poverty, I've been homeless twice. Is having an education worth it then, if the education system assumes you already know what you're doing and feel like giving away free money? Is that the system we have in place?
Think you were naive and failed to do your research beforehand hence they took your money. This doesnt appear to be once, but happened each time and you didnt learn from the previous experience.
You also seem poor at complaining or jumping ship. This made your situation worse, someone more switched on would have complained and possibly transferred.

Its a shame because if you had done some research and had decent advice, then I expect you could have avoided these problems or known how to deal with them.

Education is good for teaching you knowledge, but more importantly skills.

GCSE English and Maths- for most jobs as a min.
A levels/ level 3 for uni entry or apprenticeships with training and careers.
Degrees for graduate jobs.

If you do well in the foundation qualifications, then it creates more opportunities and choice for the next stage.
On general if you do your research and go to decent institutions then the quality of teaching should be good.
If it took no qualifications to get in, then you should be wary about what you bring to the table compared to equivalent courses.
I rarely suggest foundation courses as they tend to be the weak/easy way in for people who dont want to do level 3, but it is more expensive in the long run.

Do some careers research,
Find out what you would like to do, what you have and any funding you might have left.

Id a course or career you want and then research the steps needed to get there.
Get it checked and then go for recognised qualifications from decent providers. Qualifications that have wider acceptance.
If you cant afford university anymore, get a job and just save, then pick an industry that offers a career where you can do decent home study qualifications.

The research would have given you the best chance to avoid the experiences you had.
https://nationalcareers.service.gov.uk/

the alternative is a limited range of jobs where you are seeking progress based on working your way up from the inside, but that may be slower and you may have to start at a lower level.
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tashkent46
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I cannot tell you that. What do you want to study and why do you want to study it?

If you want to practice in a professional service like law, accountancy, medicine, teaching, a degree is not usually optional, although there are other routes they are much more difficult. Our ingenious society would rather put people through years to chase a piece of paper than just taking on apprentices.

If you want to research your subject in more detail, studying at university and getting a PHD could get you funding to do this, in which case there many not be many alternatives beyond practising in the field of question, which might be difficult for say, a historian, due to lack of funding.

If you want to learn more about your subject you are probably better off using the university libraries, in my experience lecturers are not great, they are useful but any thorough research will be done by books and you can cut the middle man (or woman) out. This does not really apply in the case of scientific research where expensive equipment might be necessary in which case a university faculty is probably indispensable.

I would say most people are going to University in this country at the moment because it is expected of them and they have nothing else to do, they are wasting time - or rather they are having a good time and getting something minor out of it, there is not really anything wrong with this. Education is an extension of childcare after all.
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sihamam981
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Think you were naive and failed to do your research beforehand hence they took your money. This doesnt appear to be once, but happened each time and you didnt learn from the previous experience.
You also seem poor at complaining or jumping ship. This made your situation worse, someone more switched on would have complained and possibly transferred.
It's easy for you to say I should have done my research. Unfortunately I did not have a crystal ball at my disposal. Yes I was naive, but there's no reasonable way I could have anticipated that a college wouldn't require its lecturers to turn up when they were supposed to let alone have any industry knowledge. My research was confined to marketing gloss, I didn't have academic insight, there were no online reviews, I was poor and limited to my area, and complaints were met with indifference. I really wish it had been my fault, that way there would have been opportunities to learn what I did wrong.

The problem is the research is a lottery. Google is not a reliable source of information, the National Careers Service doesn't have trustworthy information on careers and I can't force a training institution to train. Now I have over £30k of student loans which I will probably never be able to repay.
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sihamam981
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(Original post by tashkent46)
I would say most people are going to University in this country at the moment because it is expected of them and they have nothing else to do, they are wasting time - or rather they are having a good time and getting something minor out of it, there is not really anything wrong with this. Education is an extension of childcare after all.
Is this seriously the attitude at large on higher education? No wonder I'm having trouble taking it seriously
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999tigger
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(Original post by sihamam981)
It's easy for you to say I should have done my research. Unfortunately I did not have a crystal ball at my disposal. Yes I was naive, but there's no reasonable way I could have anticipated that a college wouldn't require its lecturers to turn up when they were supposed to let alone have any industry knowledge. My research was confined to marketing gloss, I didn't have academic insight, there were no online reviews, I was poor and limited to my area, and complaints were met with indifference. I really wish it had been my fault, that way there would have been opportunities to learn what I did wrong.

The problem is the research is a lottery. Google is not a reliable source of information, the National Careers Service doesn't have trustworthy information on careers and I can't force a training institution to train. Now I have over £30k of student loans which I will probably never be able to repay.
If you do decent research and ask the right people, then you dont need a crystal ball to make an informed decisions. Its something hundreds of thousands manage every year. You also seem not to have learnt how to complain effectively. If yud have asked on TSR you would have been appointed in the right direction. From what I could gather this has happened three times, which is rather unfortunate and forms a pattern.

Sounds like youve used a substantial part of your funding, so you should check if theres any left and if not you will have to pay to educate yourself or work at an organisation where the employer will pay.

The alternative is to accept no one is to be trusted and stay away from education. In contrast millions of students manage to progress through education successfully, so it sounds like your experience was unfortunate.
I wouldnt worry about the loans, they wont kick in unless you ever earn £25k and in most cases the vast majority of students have them written off eventually.
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sihamam981
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(Original post by 999tigger)
If you do decent research and ask the right people, then you dont need a crystal ball to make an informed decisions. Its something hundreds of thousands manage every year. You also seem not to have learnt how to complain effectively. If yud have asked on TSR you would have been appointed in the right direction. From what I could gather this has happened three times, which is rather unfortunate and forms a pattern.
This is the problem. I've never had the "right people" around to ask or the influence to make a complaint count. How do you know I didn't ask reach for every peer I could find and discovered I couldn't count on them. Of course I should have been much more aggressive in demanding quality instead of being stupid and trusting and I blame myself for that.

I think I agree with what you're really saying, that a worthwhile education requires reliable inside contacts. That was never on the table for me so that pretty much explains the situation and my chance at a decent education. Also if I asked TSR or the NCS all you'd ask me is what do I want to do. Well how was I supposed to know that.
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999tigger
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(Original post by sihamam981)
This is the problem. I've never had the "right people" around to ask or the influence to make a complaint count. How do you know I didn't ask reach for every peer I could find and discovered I couldn't count on them. Of course I should have been much more aggressive in demanding quality instead of being stupid and trusting and I blame myself for that.

I think I agree with what you're really saying, that a worthwhile education requires reliable inside contacts. That was never on the table for me so that pretty much explains the situation and my chance at a decent education. Also if I asked TSR or the NCS all you'd ask me is what do I want to do. Well how was I supposed to know that.
I am not saying that. It isnt some big mystery, just requires some common sense.
If you go shopping with £££ then make sure you know what it is you want, you know a good product and you know what to do if things go wrong. You now seem to have an answer that fits your narrative , so it all proves to you your own narrative after the event.

You made loads of mistakes, lots of money was wasted, just learn from it and move on.
Hundreds of thousands manage to education education just fine each year.
For some reason you made poor choices and didnt find the right people to help.

If you dont know what to do, then why spend any money and why not spend time in finding out what the options are and what might appeal to you. These questions are asked all the time on TSR.
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sihamam981
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(Original post by 999tigger)
I am not saying that. It isnt some big mystery, just requires some common sense.
If you go shopping with £££ then make sure you know what it is you want, you know a good product and you know what to do if things go wrong. You now seem to have an answer that fits your narrative , so it all proves to you your own narrative after the event.

You made loads of mistakes, lots of money was wasted, just learn from it and move on.
Hundreds of thousands manage to education education just fine each year.
For some reason you made poor choices and didnt find the right people to help.

If you dont know what to do, then why spend any money and why not spend time in finding out what the options are and what might appeal to you. These questions are asked all the time on TSR.
This is hilarious. You just don't listen. The indifference you give off is the same as the peers that I approached for help in the first place. I wasn't taken seriously then and I'm not being taken seriously now. What are my options if every one leads me to being exploited.

I think you lack a crucial understanding of the education system. If you are not from a stable background, you will find barriers in your way others do not have, and you're not encouraged to succeed. I tried anyway despite aware of "the narrative" in place. If you're not from a "safe and educated" background, the stigma will feed itself, hence the uncaring responses like yours.

You've also dodged my question. If there's no requirement for an educational institution to educate, why do they even exist. If they refuse to teach skills relevant for work what's the point. I can already get work which pays better than graduate entry work and my options are quite varied. But I want even better for myself and I refuse to not have a good education as a choice, even if it takes me to my 60s to get it eventually, and no matter how many times people tell me to just go away and google it. There has to be some way for someone like me to get an education.
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ajj2000
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What sort of a job were you training for? I entirely empathise by the way - nothing you have written surprises me,
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999tigger
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(Original post by sihamam981)
This is hilarious. You just don't listen. The indifference you give off is the same as the peers that I approached for help in the first place. I wasn't taken seriously then and I'm not being taken seriously now. What are my options if every one leads me to being exploited.

I think you lack a crucial understanding of the education system. If you are not from a stable background, you will find barriers in your way others do not have, and you're not encouraged to succeed. I tried anyway despite aware of "the narrative" in place. If you're not from a "safe and educated" background, the stigma will feed itself, hence the uncaring responses like yours.

You've also dodged my question. If there's no requirement for an educational institution to educate, why do they even exist. If they refuse to teach skills relevant for work what's the point. I can already get work which pays better than graduate entry work and my options are quite varied. But I want even better for myself and I refuse to not have a good education as a choice, even if it takes me to my 60s to get it eventually, and no matter how many times people tell me to just go away and google it. There has to be some way for someone like me to get an education.
Considering I navigated it perfectly well, then am in a position to know.
You didnt do your research and chose unwisely, unfortunately for you.
I have told you a number of times you will just have to notch it down to experience and look at what your remaining options are if you are still seeking to educate yourself. At the worst I was taking it to mean your funding had been exhausted.
If I was uncaring I wouldnt have bothered to answer and try to explain/ advise.

I havent dodged your question, just decided its part of your disillusionment.
Educational institutions do educate, some better than others.
Universities are academic rather than wholly vocational in nature.
Different courses teach different skills, hence doing your research.
Academic skills are relevant for work, just as purely vocational courses.
Nobody forces anyone to do them, but plenty of people get good degrees and go on to have successful professional level jobs.
Ive already explained to you at least twice what your options are.
You dont make things easy for yourself. Anyway good luck. Education system is pretty straightforward for most people except you appear to have made a series of unfortunate errors to mess up your funding, which then means you will be paying yourself or need to find someone else to pay.

You have a massive chip on your shoulder though.
If you cant trust yourself to do the research and you dont trust other people, then that leaves you in rather a pickle.

Instead of just venting against the entire education system, then why not provide a concise account of what qualifications you have and courses you have attempted with the results.
In addition what it is you are looking to do with any additional limitations or requirements.
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gjd800
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Tigger has given you a bunch of info up there that you have bypassed. It's good info, you should give it a whirl.

But aye, those places shouldn't be open if this is their attitude. Did ye take it up with anyone? there are procedures through which you can complain. I might even have been tempted to go to the papers

It helps to have an idea of what ye want to do before ye go do a degree, but I mostly did mine to be able to apply for grad roles, and I ended up going all the way to a terminal degree. I come from a poor background, too, went to a localish university and all that

Don't want to beat down on ye or be harsh, but sometimes it is a case of just going in with your eyes open and wits about ye, unfortunately. Getting stung once is bad enough, but three times must be soul destroying
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I hear you about backgrounds creating barriers into education. Not everybody understands that it is a privilege to be born into a family that sees the value in education and encourages it.

For example, those who’s own parents completed higher education and gained qualifications automatically have the advantage of being surrounded by people who understand it. Entering into higher education can be so daunting if you are one of the first in your family to go.
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sihamam981
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Considering I navigated it perfectly well, then am in a position to know.
You didnt do your research and chose unwisely, unfortunately for you.
You haven't answered my question, you've invented a prejudiced one for yourself and answered that instead. It's easy to score 100% if you bend the rules to suit yourself. At the very least you should have some alarm bells ringing in that you can't seem to tolerate criticism yet you are encouraging this poster to complain more effectively when someone lets them down.

It was never specified in any of the prospectuses or interviews I went to that in order for higher education to be successful you require industry and academic contacts at hand and to have work lined up afterwards. It was also glossed over how placements work e.g. we suggest it, but in reality you don't get one. In fact there was nothing I could have done at all as I was limited to my local area due to my financial situation and accommodation was brutally hard because family members kept dying and I had to rely on unscrupulous landlords. There was no way I could have done my research on them either, or the crappy bars I worked at which liked to reduce peoples' hours. I had to work with what I could get and I worked hard for what turned out in the end to be mickey mouse courses.

I'm going to keep asking the question, what is the point of attending higher education at an educational institute if they are uncomfortable with the responsibility of educating. I can't mind-read or use crystal balls, I don't know what questions to ask, I paid for these educators to be effective educators and subject guides and they decided that I was easy pickings. How can I determine what provider is trustworthy and reliable, and not going to take advantage of me. Do you HAVE any experience on that topic or are you going to keep making up your own question and answering that instead.

(Original post by gjd800)
But aye, those places shouldn't be open if this is their attitude. Did ye take it up with anyone? there are procedures through which you can complain. I might even have been tempted to go to the papers
Yes, many students did, we only learned afterwards how poor the reputation of the respective providers were, there was no information available on this. Unfortunately these providers did not come ill-prepared for complaints. Virtually no one I know works in the field which we studied. I tried following a serious complaint through one time but life i.e. potential homelessness got in the way, deadlines got missed, so long.

(Original post by Anonymous)
I hear you about backgrounds creating barriers into education. Not everybody understands that it is a privilege to be born into a family that sees the value in education and encourages it.

For example, those who’s own parents completed higher education and gained qualifications automatically have the advantage of being surrounded by people who understand it. Entering into higher education can be so daunting if you are one of the first in your family to go.
Yes from my experience, those who were held in high esteem got an easier ride than those with the lowest, regardless of their ability. Not to say some of them didn't make stupid decisions afterwards, but if you're not expected to go into education, you're treated pretty ruthlessly by others. That was something I didn't expect at all but I was kind of a rebel and determined to get an education despite the lack of support or encouragement.
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sihamam981
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Bump. I'd like to hear more answers
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sihamam981
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Considering I navigated it perfectly well, then am in a position to know.
You didnt do your research and chose unwisely, unfortunately for you.
I have told you a number of times you will just have to notch it down to experience and look at what your remaining options are if you are still seeking to educate yourself. At the worst I was taking it to mean your funding had been exhausted.
If I was uncaring I wouldnt have bothered to answer and try to explain/ advise.

I havent dodged your question, just decided its part of your disillusionment.
Educational institutions do educate, some better than others.
Universities are academic rather than wholly vocational in nature.
Different courses teach different skills, hence doing your research.
Academic skills are relevant for work, just as purely vocational courses.
Nobody forces anyone to do them, but plenty of people get good degrees and go on to have successful professional level jobs.
Ive already explained to you at least twice what your options are.
You dont make things easy for yourself. Anyway good luck. Education system is pretty straightforward for most people except you appear to have made a series of unfortunate errors to mess up your funding, which then means you will be paying yourself or need to find someone else to pay.

You have a massive chip on your shoulder though.
If you cant trust yourself to do the research and you dont trust other people, then that leaves you in rather a pickle.

Instead of just venting against the entire education system, then why not provide a concise account of what qualifications you have and courses you have attempted with the results.
In addition what it is you are looking to do with any additional limitations or requirements.
Hey Tigger still waiting on a response to my question. I think I owe one from you after your merciless shredding of me. Also another question, what kind of person kicks someone who is already down. Are you sure you have the right attitude to be "advising" other people at all
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999tigger
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(Original post by sihamam981)
Hey Tigger still waiting on a response to my question. I think I owe one from you after your merciless shredding of me. Also another question, what kind of person kicks someone who is already down. Are you sure you have the right attitude to be "advising" other people at all
I dont believe there is any point as your experience has entrenched you into viewing education in a certain way, which isnt the experience of most people, who go through, get a decent degree and then hopefully use that to get a decent job.

Not sure why you believe an analysis and vent against the education system is going to benefit you at all.

I have pointed out to you several times how to constructively move on firm your situation (although this still remains somewhat of a mystery) but you have decided to ignore it.

It is better that anyone else offers you their advice once they have figured out what you want and believe you are open minded enough to listen. Nobody is stopping anyone from offering you advice if that is what you are after. Ask gjd800 . Try posting your thread again.

I havent shredded you nor have I kicked you whilst you were down , but I have given you an honest appraisal of how I would be looking at things and dealing with the situation based on figuring out your options and working out the best ones available to you. Unfortunately it sounds like you have used up most of your funding and gone on the wrong course or at the wrong institution, which means you have little to show for it. If it was as poor as you say then explore making complaints and then applying through the OIA, but you need to exhaust the existing complaints procedure and have evidence. Nothing to stop you talking to them.
https://www.oiahe.org.uk/students/ca...omplain-to-us/

If I didnt feel the course was going to give me what I wanted then I wouldn't go there.
If they werent delivering what they promised I would make a complaint.
If I still wasnt happy I would go elsewhere.
That said I would understand what the course involved and what they were there to do and where the limits were.
GL.
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sihamam981
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(Original post by 999tigger)
I dont believe there is any point as your experience has entrenched you into viewing education in a certain way, which isnt the experience of most people, who go through, get a decent degree and then hopefully use that to get a decent job.

Not sure why you believe an analysis and vent against the education system is going to benefit you at all.

I have pointed out to you several times how to constructively move on firm your situation (although this still remains somewhat of a mystery) but you have decided to ignore it.

It is better that anyone else offers you their advice once they have figured out what you want and believe you are open minded enough to listen. Nobody is stopping anyone from offering you advice if that is what you are after. Ask gjd800 . Try posting your thread again.

I havent shredded you nor have I kicked you whilst you were down , but I have given you an honest appraisal of how I would be looking at things and dealing with the situation based on figuring out your options and working out the best ones available to you. Unfortunately it sounds like you have used up most of your funding and gone on the wrong course or at the wrong institution, which means you have little to show for it. If it was as poor as you say then explore making complaints and then applying through the OIA, but you need to exhaust the existing complaints procedure and have evidence. Nothing to stop you talking to them.
https://www.oiahe.org.uk/students/ca...omplain-to-us/

If I didnt feel the course was going to give me what I wanted then I wouldn't go there.
If they werent delivering what they promised I would make a complaint.
If I still wasnt happy I would go elsewhere.
That said I would understand what the course involved and what they were there to do and where the limits were.
GL.
Hey Tigger ol pal thanks for replying. Unfortunately you have avoided my question again and that's just not going to cut it I want a better answer from you or one of you team if you think you're such highly learned experts. As far as I'm concerned you've made yourself look naive and quite in need of learning yourselves.

You say a course should be treated as a consumer good yet deny a provider should be held accountable.
You keep replying with generic advice as if I'm not capable of making decision yet hold me responsible for making them.
You insist the answer is communicating here yet look at what you give: your life is screwed, tough bananas matey.

The courses promised and did not deliver. Students used every tool at their disposal and they received disdain.
In my last course the provider pointed to the assessor who in turn pointed to first year students. So we literally had students arguing against each other while the provider and assessor looked on rubbing their hands in glee.
When we complained the lecturers didn't understand their course material, the university bought an account to lynda.com. This was accessible via one computer.
Students from other years were outraged and there were reports of physical fighting between students and lecturers.
In one course a lecturer was fired for sexually molesting another student.
I can think of more.
There was no way any research would have uncovered this unless you knew exactly where to look.

My question isn't anything about doing something when it happens. That ship has sailed. You can't seem to comprehend that that isn't what I'm asking.

The point of my question is how can I prevent it again.
How do I stop being ripped off in higher education.

The experience I have offered was designed to supply context to this question not an opportunity for you to throw your personal judgement around. The more of it I give, the more assumptions you seem to share.

Since you're in the business of encouraging complaint when services are bad, can I meaningfully complain about the quality of yours? Probably not. Now do you see what I mean?

My view is that I need to go through higher education but I KEEP GETTING RIPPED OFF.
How do I stop this. Can you get one of your team to answer.
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999tigger
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(Original post by sihamam981)
Hey Tigger ol pal thanks for replying. Unfortunately you have avoided my question again and that's just not going to cut it I want a better answer from you or one of you team if you think you're such highly learned experts. As far as I'm concerned you've made yourself look naive and quite in need of learning yourselves.

You say a course should be treated as a consumer good yet deny a provider should be held accountable.
You keep replying with generic advice as if I'm not capable of making decision yet hold me responsible for making them.
You insist the answer is communicating here yet look at what you give: your life is screwed, tough bananas matey.

The courses promised and did not deliver. Students used every tool at their disposal and they received disdain.
In my last course the provider pointed to the assessor who in turn pointed to first year students. So we literally had students arguing against each other while the provider and assessor looked on rubbing their hands in glee.
When we complained the lecturers didn't understand their course material, the university bought an account to lynda.com. This was accessible via one computer.
Students from other years were outraged and there were reports of physical fighting between students and lecturers.
In one course a lecturer was fired for sexually molesting another student.
I can think of more.
There was no way any research would have uncovered this unless you knew exactly where to look.

My question isn't anything about doing something when it happens. That ship has sailed. You can't seem to comprehend that that isn't what I'm asking.

The point of my question is how can I prevent it again.
How do I stop being ripped off in higher education.

The experience I have offered was designed to supply context to this question not an opportunity for you to throw your personal judgement around. The more of it I give, the more assumptions you seem to share.

Since you're in the business of encouraging complaint when services are bad, can I meaningfully complain about the quality of yours? Probably not. Now do you see what I mean?

My view is that I need to go through higher education but I KEEP GETTING RIPPED OFF.
How do I stop this. Can you get one of your team to answer.
You are under the misguided notion that I have some obligation to you. I do not.
I have given you several detailed constructive answers so far as to how to move on,
This is a public forum and anyone else can answer your question.
Nothing is stopping that.
Try starting the thread again and see if anyone else wishes to offer advice to you.
You might want to start off by providing relevant information about who you are as a student, what qualifications and grades you have, what you wish to do, which institutions and courses you applied for and , a brief synopsis of what went wrong and what grades or qualification you left with. You have consistently failed to do this.
By doing so people can get a better of what your situation is.

I am not seeing anyone but gjd800

To avoid getting ripped off then.
1. Do proper research.
1.1 You arent going anywhere without knowing you have enough finance left.
2. ID good quality providers on the basis of that research.
3. Get their entrance requirements and dont settle for institutions much lower down the food chain.
[ Many thousands of students do this each year and complete their qualifications with no problems. Being ripped off is not the norm, so to have experienced it once is unlucky, twice very unlucky, but three times is crazy unlucky and you should look at your method of selection as well as having realistic expectations of how uni works and what they are there for.]
4. If you are unhappy with your course when starting, then follow the complaints procedure and or leave.
5. If you are unhappy after that speak to the OIA.
6. Education counts as a service under the Consumer Rights Act. If you feel they have not provided you with the service in contravention of the act you can sue the uni. Speak to CAB to get you started.
7. Both of these options are time consuming and should not be taken lightly.
8. They also require reliable evidence in order to make your case.

Feel free to make a complaint about me and the quality of my answers or the time spent trying to help you.
You can do that by posting in ask the community team.
You are better off starting your thread fresh and seeing if anyone is interested feels they can help you.
Good luck.
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gjd800
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Tigger is right. To not get ripped off, go to a reputable institution. Sounds pithy, but this would not have happened where I work, for example.
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